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whatever happened to the Indigo children?

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posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


You are comparing abilities to your stereotyping of individuals, I get what you are aiming for. You aren't here to applaud anyone who discloses such information. You are here to bash them because you yourself find superheroes and comic book people "geeks" and "dorky".

I can read you quite well my friend, and with that being said, I believe I will keep my secrets to myself. But on that note, I just wanted to let you know that I do not indulge myself into your classified as "comic book geek" category. So you can leave that at the door.




posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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Originally posted by WiindWalker
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


You are comparing abilities to your stereotyping of individuals, I get what you are aiming for. You aren't here to applaud anyone who discloses such information. You are here to bash them because you yourself find superheroes and comic book people "geeks" and "dorky".

I can read you quite well my friend, and with that being said, I believe I will keep my secrets to myself. But on that note, I just wanted to let you know that I do not indulge myself into your classified as "comic book geek" category. So you can leave that at the door.


I've been reading 'superhero' and sci-fi/action comics on-and-off since about 1974 and am still reading them now I'm in my mid 40s; so possibly before you were born. I'm currently waiting on the end of Sweet Tooth and the Boys, still into Fables and Hellblazer &c but still read a lot of tights and capes stuff: Fantastic Four/FF; various Avengers-related titles, Daredevil, the Watchmen prequels and so on. Don't read much in the way of DC stuff though, unless it's a Vertigo title.

Some of my favourite films of the last couple of years have been the Batman reboot, the Thor and Avengers films but I thought the Captain America one was bad. I wasn't keen on the Hulk films nor the Fantastic Four films though - I thought the latter films should have been set as a 60s period piece, like the X-Men First Class, but more kitsch - as I expected a lot more and thought the Hulk's cgi was never really right until the Avengers film (although I'd have preferred a grey Hulk). Silver Surfer and Galactus were wasted in the Fantastic Four film. I thought the Green Lantern film was probably the biggest let-down of all though and at the same time the Daredevil film from a few years ago was under-rated.

I parted ways with Manga and anime in the early 90s though as if I wanted to see pictures of young girls in knickers I'd become a paedophile.

I played table-top RPGs on and off from about 1979 through to the late 1990s and played a large amount of different gaming systems: basic through to expert through to advanced D&D; MERP, Legend of the 5 Rings, a Star Wars RPG, a superhero one I can't remember the name of, Deadlands, the Call of Cthulhu version set in the 20s/30s blah blah blah.

My favourite computer game series are Warhammer 40k stuff. My favourite race to play are the Tau taking the Fist of Mont'Ka path as I can't get enough of armoured space communists with no noses. I even used to paint figures too, but it became inordinately expensive and the older I got the more I've had to prioritise a limited income.

You think I have a problem with superheroes, comics and geeks? I think your skillset needs some work, as does your ability to 'read people'.
edit on 24-11-2012 by Merriman Weir because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 07:47 AM
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Where are these super-gifted young adults with incredible abilities now? Why aren't they actually changing the world or influencing it in the way that some claimed they would be able to?


What makes you think they are gone, and not actually doing their thing right now, and all along?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by WoodSpirit



Where are these super-gifted young adults with incredible abilities now? Why aren't they actually changing the world or influencing it in the way that some claimed they would be able to?


What makes you think they are gone, and not actually doing their thing right now, and all along?


Because they were a fairly vocal demographic on a whole variety of forums, making claims to all kinds of abilities. Then it all stopped.

'Why did it all stop?' is not an unreasonable question.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Ah I see your point.

Maybe they realised that "floanting" their abilities on the internet wasn't the way to go. And usually the responses were not very encouraging.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by WoodSpirit
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Ah I see your point.

Maybe they realised that "floanting" their abilities on the internet wasn't the way to go.


The consensus suggests something else. Flaunting their abilities on internet forums and then 'taking the hump' seems fairly at odds with the whole idea of a highly intelligent and spiritually developed subrace who are here for the betterment of mankind.

Flaunting and flouncing? That seems fairly typical immature 'teenage' behaviour rather than the saviours of the world.


And usually the responses were not very encouraging.

I agree. However, as Marcello Truzzi is meant to have said: extraordinary require extraordinary proof. It's not entirely unreasonable to question some of the claims made by Indigo children, particularly when they are strangers on the internet.
edit on 24-11-2012 by Merriman Weir because: .



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 
Poor fellows.

They're willingly conscripted to a self-perpetuating marketing scheme that acts as a sort of real-life theatre wherein they are all endowed with invisible superior powers.

A bit like Mr Furious and his Mystery Men 'superheroes.'



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 





Flaunting and flouncing? That seems fairly typical immature 'teenage' behaviour rather than the saviours of the world.


I used qoutation marks for a reason. If people only suggest that they see themselves as indigo's, other people say they are boasting, flaunting etc. The post above is a good example. Almost with disdain and hatred.




However, as Marcello Truzzi is meant to have said: extraordinary require extraordinary proof. It's not entirely unreasonable to question some of the claims made by Indigo children, particularly when they are strangers on the internet.


I just tried to answer your question, I wasn't talking about proving stuff. How can one prove that one is an "indigo"?
edit on 24-11-2012 by WoodSpirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 
Poor fellows.

They're willingly conscripted to a self-perpetuating marketing scheme that acts as a sort of real-life theatre wherein they are all endowed with invisible superior powers.

A bit like Mr Furious and his Mystery Men 'superheroes.'


I don't have the bandwidth for the YouTube clip but I liked the Mystery Men film a lot.

The 'willing conscript' thing is an interesting idea as a lot of the 'known' Indigo children appear to have a kind of 'pushy stage mother' figure behind them. Also, there seems to be trend of sorts, where I've personal experience of several cases, where 'concerned' middle-class mothers seem adamant that their children are somewhere on the autism spectrum, even if doctors and sometimes even the children themselves are doubtful (and indeed, anyone who actually meets the kids themselves). It's like the mothers want there to be something 'wrong' or 'different' about their children.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


Don't be scared, you are not inferior to anyone.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 
Perhaps it's a class sort of thing?

Poorer mothers' children get diagnosed by doctors or CAMHS as being on the Aspergers/Autism spectrum or being ADHD. Middle-class mothers diagnose their own children as Indigos and bestow upon them a mission to save the world.

I'm being facetious there, but in terms of willingness, when the kids hit adulthood they make a choice to keep up the charade or accept they are no better or worse than the rest of us on life's bell-curve.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:23 AM
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Originally posted by WoodSpirit
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 





Flaunting and flouncing? That seems fairly typical immature 'teenage' behaviour rather than the saviours of the world.


I used qoutation marks for a reason. If people only suggest that they see themselves as indigo's, other people say they are boasting, fluanting etc. The post above is a good example. Almost with disdain and hatred.


My apologies, I honestly thought you were using inverted commas to draw attention to the word because of the way you were spelling it. Again, sorry. Genuine mistake. I'm conscious of the fact I use inverted commas too often and sometimes wrongly. I generally do it for emphasis of some kind and would, perhaps, be better using italics in some of these places.

No, what I typed wasn't in hatred. More in bemusement if I'm being completely honest. Many things related to Indigo children, often marked out as 'special' are actually fairly common or even typical traits found elsewhere: empathy, intelligence, feeling of difference or purpose, spiritual awareness and so on. That's what I meant when I said 'typical teenage behaviour'. As much an observation as it was a criticism.

The other side of this is the atypical stuff, the claims of 'abilities' that are sometimes only hinted at but the suggestion is that these are remarkable and not ordinary or common or typical to teenagers or young adults. There's been a few example of this on this thread. Surely these are open to scrutiny or questioning?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Jeah, I misspelled the word, so my bad too.

And I was refering to Kandinsky's post.




The other side of this is the atypical stuff, the claims of 'abilities' that are sometimes only hinted at but the suggestion is that these are remarkable and not ordinary or common or typical to teenagers or young adults. There's been a few example of this on this thread. Surely these are open to scrutiny or questioning?


Off course they are, but like I said, how does one prove such claims?

Brings me back to the point I made, what's the use in saying your an indigo with certain powers, if you can't prove it and you get ridiculed anyway?


edit on 24-11-2012 by WoodSpirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


What is the phenomenon that is keeping you from replying to me?

You wanted to, but didn't.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by Kandinsky
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 
Perhaps it's a class sort of thing?

Poorer mothers' children get diagnosed by doctors or CAMHS as being on the Aspergers/Autism spectrum or being ADHD. Middle-class mothers diagnose their own children as Indigos and bestow upon them a mission to save the world.

I'm being facetious there, but in terms of willingness, when the kids hit adulthood they make a choice to keep up the charade or accept they are no better or worse than the rest of us on life's bell-curve.



I don't think you're being facetious about class though. I think it's a fair point. Class is a hard thing to handle though as it seems to be a very different phenomena in different places. Britain is riddled with it, no matter what politicians say these days, whereas America generally tends to think of themselves less class-orientated and the bulk of them would self-identify as 'middle-class' - something that' patently not true in Britain.

Class (and wealth) opens up opportunities for self expression in many ways. Gap years, time out to find yourself, navel gazing, give it all up to follow your dreams and so on are things that are generally denied to lower strata of society. Arguably, you can extend this to avenues of education and training: internships and the pursuit of an arts education, &c.

Class (and wealth) may give the opportunity to have the deciding voice in how people are perceived. Hyperactive kid on a council estate can easily be portrayed as being the parents fault: upbringing, life choices, diet, neglect and so on. The same scenario with a nice middle-class family can as easily be portrayed as a heroic battle against doctors who just won't listen and the state, who helps scroungers and foreigners, won't help and the mother's had to give up her 37k a year job to look after the child. A middle-class family are more likely to have the time, money, sharp elbows and influence to get that second and third opinion that fits how they see a situation.

As for the kids keep up a charade, I'm not sure how that can really pan out, to be honest. It's one thing to be a super-space-wizard-alien on the internet to strangers and then log off in a huff and another to try and pass this off to other adults in real life, face-to-face situations. I don't think many of them truly believe it in a genuine delusional sense and it's going to create a legacy of mental illness or anything. I think it's more a case of looking back at some of the bands you used to listen to at school/college/university and thinking 'how did I listen to that'?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 08:54 AM
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Originally posted by WoodSpirit
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Jeah, I misspelled the word, so my bad too.

And I was refering to Kandinsky's post.


No problem, sorry about the confusion.



Off course they are, but like I said, how does one prove such claims?

Brings me back to the point I made, what's the use in saying your an indigo with certain powers, if you can't prove it and you get ridiculed anyway?



It depends on the nature of the claim. Someone above claimed they were able to read me and claimed I had a beef with comic geeks and the like. The reality is, I'm probably as geek as anyone on these boards. The bulk of my friendships have been either with musicians or people I've known through RPGs, comics and the like. I have a fair rack of problems but self-loathing and hating my friends aren't any of them.

The Indigo phenomena was presented as a global thing: an awakening of sorts that was ushering in a great change in humanity and the world. A good proof would be to see whether this change has occurred. I'd suggest 'not really'. If there is some small change happening, I'd strongly argue that it's a political change and awakening that owes more to the fact that many are realising the right wing, materialist, consumer culture they've been sold through Thatcherism in Britain and the American Dream in America &c, is bollocks. Nothing to do with Indigos at all and for anyone to suggest it is, is massively insulting to the people who've been fighting for these politics long before someone even thought of the term 'Indigo children'.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 





The Indigo phenomena was presented as a global thing: an awakening of sorts that was ushering in a great change in humanity and the world. A good proof would be to see whether this change has occurred. I'd suggest 'not really'. If there is some small change happening, I'd strongly argue that it's a political change and awakening that owes more to the fact that many are realising the right wing, materialist, consumer culture they've been sold through Thatcherism in Britain and the American Dream in America &c, is bollocks. Nothing to do with Indigos at all and for anyone to suggest it is, is massively insulting to the people who've been fighting for these politics long before someone even thought of the term 'Indigo children'.


The actual fight is actually fought over the minds of the individual people. Not to detract from the work of known free spirits, but I think you underestimate the influence an "indigo" can have on the people around them.

At one point, critical mass will be reached, and it will be mostly due to the people that woke up all the people around them by just being a beacon.
edit on 24-11-2012 by WoodSpirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by WoodSpirit
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


The actual fight is actually fought over the minds of the individual people. Not to detract from the work of known free spirits, but I think you underestimate the influence an "indigo" can have on the people around them.

At one point, critical mass will be reached, and it will be mostly due to the people that woke up all the people around them by just being a beacon.
edit on 24-11-2012 by WoodSpirit because: (no reason given)


Unfortunately, the influence the self-proclaimed indigo seems to be generally negative or inconsequential. As you pointed out, they just seem to get laughed at, or treated with disdain or hatred.

Also, it's a case of 'extraordinary claims... ' if any change did occur, why would anyone believe it was to do with Indigo children and not one of the zillion claims of alien intervention that I see yearly, or the rise in anti-capitalist/anti-materialist politics through more 'mundane' means? Why should anyone believe the people who claim to be Indigo?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Indigo's get laughed at on the internet.

In real life, everybody around them knows what they are, and they don't get laughed at.



edit on 24-11-2012 by WoodSpirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 
I've known a few women over the years who were secure in their belief that they were psychic. I don't have a problem with that and we all maintain some beliefs about ourselves that might seem absurd or unfounded to others. Of those who claimed to have psychic skills, off-hand, I can't think of any examples or displays that would support their claims. It was mostly intuitive, subjective material.

It might be similar in spirit with Indigos? Some may feel internally certain of their abilities and importance despite having little or no evidence that would be acceptable to non-Indigos.

Incidentally, as I'm typing this, my mind's trying to think of societal revolutions that have occurred since the book came out. We had the Labour Movements of the 19th Century, Abolition decades earlier, the 20th century Suffragettes, female liberation in the 60s/70s, Civil Rights etc etc. All of which made huge changes to the dynamics of society and economics.

Since the Indigos, I'm struggling to think of either movements or more discreet societal trends that we could, for argument's sake, attribute to them. Globally, it all seems much of a muchness in the past 2-3 decades. Western standards of living have improved and yet they've been doing so for at least a century. Perceptions of Global Security seem to me worse and I grew up during the last years of the Cold War. Is the world a safer place for the many? Some could argue either way.






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