Job Opening in Mexico

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posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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I’m not real familiar with the Mexican job market but it seems the only jobs available are for teachers or travel agents. There are 4 in San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico and the ones I’ve checked out require speaking fluent English. I see this may benefit one of us Americans but don’t see any opportunities for the Hispanic community. I can’t give live links but anyone can look for work abroad and come to the same conclusions in Mexico. We need to fix that!

If we gather enough officials in all of our local areas we may be able to solve some issues.

This controversial subject has been eating away at me lately. What to do about illegal aliens and what to do about US companies outsourcing overseas. I put these 2 together as a solution. My ancestors came over from Germany in the 1860’s and became citizens legally. Why is it more difficult now days to become a US citizen? I am torn on how to address the issue. I do however think all those children born here or were raised here to attend our school all their lives should have the same rights as we do no matter which nationally they are. They are innocent children going about their daily life and being denied driver’s license’s when they turn 16, not able to go to college, etc. All of our ancestors immigrated here.

I’ve always been opposed to outsourcing and Corporate America certainly isn’t doing its part to help bring America out of its economic malaise, mostly due to government regulations.

Here is my answer; Let’s make Mexico a wealthy Country! Outsource to Mexico only. It may sound crazy but would be a beneficial, lucrative investment.

It would solve drug wars, build schools and hospitals in Mexico, create millions of jobs there and help the border problem. It only benefits the United States and Mexico to do this. I assume I’d be jumping their fence in 2016. Mexico is our neighbor, as is Canada. I don’t know if I agree with the North American Union but this can be handled a lot better than ignoring it all these years. I see both the US and Canada have health care for most, did someone forget about Mexico? We are joined at the hip.

When I see China, India, and the Philippines building new skyscrapers and enjoying the wealth we provide them I’m thinking this money should be invested in our neighbor. We could all enjoy that prosperity, going to lavish Mexican Vacations, seeing their economy blossom. Allow them passports and the money comes back to the US and elsewhere. I know it isn’t that simple.

Just these few companies General Electric, Caterpillar, Microsoft, Wal-Mart, Chevron, Cisco, Intel, Stanley Works, Merck, United Technologies, and Oracle cut their workforces by 2.9 million people over the last decade while hiring 2.4 million people overseas. Why overseas? Why not next door?

One way to help accomplish this would be let big corporations bring money they have stashed overseas back to the U.S. at a dramatically lower tax rate creating less of a need to outsource. The place to start is lowering the corporate tax rate which is now the highest rate in the industrialized world. The Philippines overtook India in call center seats in 2011. Its red hot there and their economy grew by 6% last quarter. Does anyone have any idea about how to transfer the wealth to our neighbors in Mexico. We would need Mexican leadership that we can work with. I’d create a contract Trade Agreement with the Mexican government that in exchange for giving them these jobs they are not allowed to outsource this work.

Companies could still prosper since the cost of living is a lot less in Mexico their dollar would go farther to outweigh the labor expense. Not similar to China manipulating the dollar, rather we consider doing this the honest way. It would still be cost effective, no overhead, continue low operating costs, save on seasonal problems, and hire internal staff for control and regulations and this is more cost effective for communication barriers and interpreters that need training overseas. . Simply re-write the US/Mexican corporation tax code, those same dollars would fund their hospitals and have adequate medical testing equipment.

Another huge asset to this is less phone stress to call overseas and try to understand what they are trying to say other than “thank you mam” “so sorry mam” I apologize mam” they must apologize at least 8 times during each call wasting our time. Spanish and English are already easily established.

My forefathers fought and died for the Union but now I have many second thoughts about this, especially with the Twinkie workers at Hostess. Get real!!!! The US is falling apart and the EU is close behind being held together with duct tape. We must do something. I wish ATS allowed petitions but they do not. The days seem long gone from when I turned over an item to see the words “made in Mexico” Does anyone agree? I’ve sacrificed my values I’ve placed on my strong support of Union work so that my Country can survive. I think we must all reevaluate our futures and that which is being passed on to our children.

If we can’t get our US jobs back let’s give it all to Mexico and throw in unlimited US/Mexico work visas going both directions for US workers as well. I say we give Mexico those 2.4 million, overseas jobs ASAP, since it’s apparent we won’t get them back. That is my solution on this subject. I welcome any ideas.. Would you prefer those new skyscrapers, hospitals and colleges built overseas or in our back yard? We police the world and send aid across the globe, yet we neglect our neighbors. It makes no sense.

On the other hand if China wants to play this way we can also devalue our dollar. A weaker dollar makes overseas travel more expensive for Americans. So what! A weaker dollar makes imports more expensive and that’s really the point right?

Each job that is outsourced creates a new US competitive opportunity! We need to take advantage of these and there are many! I see many benefits to implementing the plan with Mexico. It will also make the borders a safer place for all. Ignoring this subject has gotten us nowhere beneficial. We are talking about millions of jobs and TRILLIONS in cash.

I believe we not only deserve the American Dream for generations to come but a dream for all to become self sufficient and prosper. Government has failed us. They need to loosen up regulations and act quickly. I think we need some Senators on board here. I don’t have all the stats on tax codes in Mexico and other obstructive decisions the US has placed on this plan but it can’t possibly be that difficult to accomplish.

I know many may think “just kick them all out and build a fence” Many of us know that doesn’t work and have some sort of humanity. It may be a dream but I’d personally love it to see Mexico flourish, and not only in Cuernavaca, Guadalajara , Mexico City, Monterrey, , etc but in all corners of the Country. Can you see the benefits from such a plan? I want our US newspapers to say “Job Openings in Mexico” to benefit American workers traveling there, as well. It’s kind of one sided right now, yet it’s left as a hot potato that no one wants to address.. I’ve traveled to parts of Mexico, both good and bad and the children I have seen in poorer areas should be addressed now.

I have no personal benefit from this and don’t live near the border. If I see it so do you. Wouldn’t we all like to look over that fence and see prosperity and growth?




posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by wonderworld
 


I thought about moving to Mexico a few years ago and changed my mind. It's very difficult to get a job in Mexico. Much harder there, than it is for people coming from the States.

LINK


30 day business visitor form can be secured upon presentation of: •A valid passport or a certified copy of the birth certificate or a citizenship card plus a recent picture identification. 2.Letter from the company represented of by the interested individual if traveling alone, stating the specific purpose and the length of the trip and guaranteeing that the salaries and all expenses will be paid by the company of the individual and not by anyone in Mexico. For stays longer than 30 days:



•A valid passport with a minimum of six months from the date of entry. 2.Two recent front view passport size photos. 3.A letter from the company represented or by the interested individual if traveling alone, stating the specific purpose and the length of the trip and guaranteeing that the salaries and all expenses will be paid by the company or the individual and not by anyone in Mexico. 4.The consular fee, as of July 1996, for non-lucrative activities of: $63.00 or for lucrative activities of $102.00.



VERY IMPORTANT: The applicant must understand that it is entirely up to the Consulate General of Mexico to determine under which classification the individual must be documented based on the initial declaration of the intended activities in Mexico. The consular fees mentioned in US Dollars are quoted at the present rate of exchange and are subject to change. They can be paid by Bank/Postal money order, or cash (when applying in person); personal checks are not accepted. Because several applications are received daily the consulate must work on a first come, first served basis.


If you plan on just moving there and getting a job while not affiliated with a company, forget about it. That is even more difficult.

It doesn't require just a green card, like we have in the States.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by wonderworld
 


Hmm if such a scenario happen I'm sure illegal American immigrants will come to Mexico



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by Sissel
 

Wow, I wasnt aware of the consular fee but I guess they need more cash to run the Country. That is why I started this thread to somehow find a solution for them to prosper, build, develop and thrive, in a productive way for both our Countries. A trade treaty may be appropriate to avoid fees in exchange for our outsourced business.

Thanks for the link



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 08:57 PM
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Originally posted by starwarsisreal
reply to post by wonderworld
 


Hmm if such a scenario happen I'm sure illegal American immigrants will come to Mexico


Yes, many would be jumping the fence to get in to Mexico but not if it was constructed properly where we'd give them 2.4 million jobs that are currently overseas. We would be part of the action. That's why I thought about passports and work visas openly for both US and Mexico.
edit on 17-11-2012 by wonderworld because: spelling



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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There is a whole new set of immigration laws in Mexico that went into effect the beginning of November and the implementation of them is still being worked out. In many ways it does improve the ability to receive a permanent visa to live in Mexico but there are a various set of requirements that can be used depending on one's particular situation.

In the seven years I have lived in Mexico there have been many improvements on the highways and infrastructure. Mexico's economy is vastly improving and a middle-class is steadily growing but there still is a shortage of jobs and Americans would not consider the pay to be liveable. Many people are returning to Mexico including children that have grown up in the US and those who would qualify as citizens who need to go through Mexican immigrations to establish their right to be here.

It is a different world here, strangely familiar with many products that Americans would be accustomed to but with a different priority to the mode of living. Healthcare is readily available here and affordable, and with programs to make it more available to those who might not have the regular means. Although poverty exists there is very little homelessness.

Many luxuries that an American may consider essential are things that are available here but are often not really considered desirable to have - and I am not speaking of toys and posessions kids and teenagers covet, most all them have their laptops, cell phones, Playstations with many game cartridges, their cars and clothes, and other modern trappings, most homes do not have carpeting, hang their clothes out to dry rather than use dryers, and many see no practical or sanitary use for having indoor plumbing in the main part of their home. I could list many examples like that - neither myself nor any of my neighbors have heaters nor air-conditioning in their home, though their cars are likely to have them.

You have many good ideas about outsourcing products to manufacture here, which is already being done but could be done on a larger scale. You may be surprised to learn that presently many familiar American companies and brands are being bought up by Mexican companies. The largest North American bakery company, Bimbo, a Mexican brand, has recently purchased Sara Lee, but that is just the tip of the iceberg.

There are certain aspects of American culture and politics that would be best kept out of this world. By tradition there is a very conservative attitude that is pervasive here but at the same time is a very open and tolerant society. In many cases law enforcement does not step in unless there is a nuisance and most times things stay in balance but when authority becomes to watchful and overbearing, as is often done in the US, then situations tend to become unmanageable under that kind of pressure.

There are a few communities that have become "anglo" havens and are often enjoyable to visit - some I take my wife to visit for the "American experience" but they are not desirable places to live full-time except for those immigrants here that may need a half-step into this culture - and many who acclimate well will leave those areas for a more "Mexican" lifestyle that for many is much preferable.

I do not look forward to Mexico becoming more like the US. Mexico is truly of the modern world and the largest and best infra-structured of all the Spanish-speaking countries, but not all aspects and institutions of the anglo world are necessarily good or conducive to comfortable living. There are many misperceptions about life here and many lessons that can be learned by those who are perceptive and open to different ideas and ways of thinking about things. I have learned a lot a wish never to go back.

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 01:25 AM
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More on that buy-up of American brands by Mexican corporations -

usatoday30.usatoday.com...


A new kind of Mexican immigrant is making it big in the USA: huge Mexican corporations that are snapping up U.S. brand names, opening U.S. factories and investing millions of pesos north of the border.

From Thomas' English Muffins to Borden milk, Saks Fifth Avenue department stores to The New York Times newspaper, Mexican investors have taken advantage of low interest rates and depressed prices during the economic downturn to expand their holdings in el norte.

Newcomers include Grupo Lala, Mexico's largest dairy company, based in Gómez Palacios in the northern state of Durango.

Lala bought a yogurt plant in Omaha in 2007. In 2009, it purchased Dallas-based National Dairy Holdings, which controls the Borden brand and 18 regional dairies selling milk under the names Flav-O-Rich, Dairy Fresh, Velda Farms, Sinton's, Cream O' Weber, Goldenrod and others.

Grupo Bimbo, Latin America's largest baked-goods company, has also expanded its U.S. operations.

In 2009, Mexico City-based Bimbo bought the U.S. baked-goods operations of Weston Foods for $2.4 billion, taking over 22 industrial bakeries and 4,000 distribution routes. In all, the Mexican company has 35 bakeries in the USA turning out national brands such as Entenmann's pastries, Boboli pizza crusts and Thomas' English Muffins to regional brands such as Brownberry bread and Mrs. Baird's snack cakes. About 43% of Bimbo's 2009 sales were in the USA.


It doesn't stop with just the food brands listed here but with banks, building supplies, and other concerns. The currently richest man in the world, Carlos Slim, lives in Mexico. Not all is as you may have been led to believe it is, on many levels.

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Wow, I appreciate all this information. It seems like things are going well there. I do know what you mean about the cops and judges backing down and things going haywire from time to time.

I didn’t mean to imply your Country should be like ours we live comfortably side by side for the most part and enjoy our cultural values.

I suppose my travel through Tijuana is what sticks in my mind but that was years ago, and I’m happy you say they are no longer homeless.

I still prefer those 2.4 million jobs closer to home. Preferably back in the US but that isn’t cost effective with the way things are now.

I am not educated on the current Mexican economy. I only hear story’s of scared people staying inside in Arizona in fear of being hauled off like the Gestapo. I’m curious why they choose to stay there. Are there a lot of semi-skilled labor jobs available in Mexico? I think we both have an unemployment problem, and would be nice to solve both with some constructive solution.

I had some sort of idea that people were getting shot and killed trying to cross the border to earn money for their children. Is this true?

The US needs a few more tax payers to sustain the economy. The entitlement programs are not sustainable at this rate.
I simply want less violence along the border and a ban on overseas outsourcing. Maybe if the US falls off the fiscal cliff we’ll reorganize some sort of global bankruptcy but the other side of such a scenario is very alarming. It would be worse than the Great Depression and more like Hyperinflation. It could also cause a one world currency. That is something I worry about. It affects the global economy.

It’s also nice to know your country is more frugal and seem to appreciate the small things.

One question; What exactly makes it so difficult to become a US citizen compared to the Ellis Island days? I’m culturally illiterate I guess. I even assumed your main outsourced jobs were building solar panels.

I cant imagine the stress it would cause me to be considered illegal. I assume they believe the risk is worth it. Am I correct?

Thanks again!




posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I knew the day would come when i'd see threads and comments like this, every one thought I was nuts.

I have lived in mexico for 17 years. Politically and strategically mexico is a quagmire yet some how very solvent, What I mean is very hard to put into words, guess you can say improvisation while holding to the natural food chain of life out weighs profound stupidity.

Mexico is a very controlled country, yet the individual right to be utterly stupid and inconsiderate does not prevent you from obtaining a family and a home.

Corruption in Mexico is not a disease like in most Latin countries rather it is a confusing system of symbiosis that not only oppresses and extorts but also protects and nurtures the majority of extremely ignorant people of Mexico.

Geographically amazing, and full of resources, with more rich per capita than any other country in the world but still full of trash burning, drunk driving, ranchero blasting retards Mexico, a country on the brink of revolution every election can only be described as a whole nother world.

I love Mexico despite they could not build a good road if their life depended on it. To me, down here, this is life....with out the training wheels.

Viva Mexico!

The Rat.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:17 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I wish wealth upon the Mexican community, that alone may help the issues and offer more jobs! I'm really impressed. It shows how much I know; however I still wonder what draws many to the US when things are thriving there. Better pay but a higher cost of living?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by TucoTheRat
 


I'm glad you love your land! I guess I'm just confused about why so many wish to come illegally. It looks like the Mexican government is working on immigration laws, that I hope benefit, rather than harm people.

We need those overseas jobs back, either that or get a kickback for providing them. This country is so messed up.

How much does a middle class home cost on average there in Mexico?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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reply to post by wonderworld
 


Despite a lot of hot air from politicians and false propaganda being aired on the news the back door to the US is open to immigrants. Despite in the past having avenues for obtaining temporary work visas for seasonal workers it was discovered to be a much better control device to keep them as "illegal" workers so that none could complain about pay or work conditions nor be represented by farm workers unions. It would not be difficult to get rid of 90% of those immigrants if they really were not wanted, but they are largely good workers that are willing to work long hours for low pay, which goes a long way in Mexico if being wired back home to their families here.

The illegal worker thing is a scam and those workers are desired, hence why they are being provided with all the services. Sometimes I think only Americans are suckers enough to accept the kind of service and cost of healthcare the US citizen receives, and is relatively content with to the point of being boastful about the quality of care they receive. It is much different here, more available and MUCH more affordable, not to mention the time one actually spends with their physician. A doctor visit here costs around $3, there usually is no waiting and no appointment necessary and it seems much more comprehensive and personal compared to a visit to a US doctor. When that care is given for free under a program here there is much longer waiting time with more people in line ahead. What they receive in the US under programs is much the same but would cost that $3 here.

Everything Tuco the Rat says in his post above is also true but could be weighed against and combined with my post for a bigger picture. To which extreme it breaks out to may depend a lot on location but the theme heard from either and both of us is that with exercising our choice it is down here where we would be - there really is no alternative, not anymore after living the truth. My life needs no training wheels and the ride is much better without them. If one can deal with the good, the bad, and the ugly they will find greater beauty than they had ever imagined.

Resort and border towns do not give a glimpse or proper perspective to what life is actually like here. I live in the central highlands about as in middle of Mexico as one can get. I also live in a large city with all the conveniences and cultural, educational, and recreational offerings one could have. Further out of town it can get rather wild and wooley. Those Americans who tell me they would demand a rural lifestyle know not how rural it can get very quickly. Less than 30 miles out of town think Deliverance translated into Spanish.

¡Viva México!

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 03:02 AM
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Originally posted by wonderworld
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I wish wealth upon the Mexican community, that alone may help the issues and offer more jobs! I'm really impressed. It shows how much I know; however I still wonder what draws many to the US when things are thriving there. Better pay but a higher cost of living?


Although my perception is that we have a lot here it requires a great job or several working in the household. For an unskilled worker that might work long hours and six days a week to make $200 - $400 dollars, if lucky, then compare that to similar hours working construction in the US, working harder and without complaint than most any American youth, and how far that $2,000 or more a month would go here, just figure it out.

Most of your immigrant workers do not come from the bigger cities that have better opportunity, if they have at least the minimal education now required. They may come from a tiny rancho where $200 extra brought into their household is living high. Coming back from the US might provide them with what is needed to buy a plot of land, build their own home, and have their own extended family. It really is a dream come true for many.

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by wonderworld
 


Let me put it to you this way. When it comes to illegal immigration to the US you can't think small scale you have to look at the big panorama.

The US is a wonderful, amazing country full of really good people. The way of life in the US was and for the majority still is grand. But the US cannot compete on a global market with it's current population and price of housing. It just can't.

America will always be a great country but people need to earn less to compete with China and India, mexico is in trouble in this area too just like the US but not so much.

But America can't lower wages because of price of housing. I really don't know the future of the US but something has to give, regretfully.

Your governments has let illegal immigration happen for the future human recourse it's going to need, because Mexicans bread like rabbits and Whites don't. The US government is not being up front with it's white population and is in reality selling them out for a more apathetic yet hard working race.

Remember what made america the power house it is was the baby boomers White people breading like rabbits, not the case these days and so your government has found more convenient ways to supply the resources it's going to need in the future.

Because you have to ask yourself, who can a country like Mexico control illegal immigration easily, i don't mean Guatemalans passing by to the US, I mean in Mexico, Yet the US can't?

Why do Mexicans go to the US because it's the great America sown in all the movies, because of money and because it's right next door and easy. Unlike any other country.

The Rat.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro

For an unskilled worker that might work long hours and six days a week to make $200 - $400 dollars, if lucky, then compare that to similar hours working construction in the US, working harder and without complaint than most any American youth, and how far that $2,000 or more a month would go here, just figure it out.


Sorry, I didn't make that clear about the pay here. Working 6 days a week for an unskilled worker maybe amounts to $200 - $400 a month, perhaps that higher figure possible in a large city or tourist area where wages can be higher. Minimum wage is around $5 a day.

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


You have answered some important questions. I’m aware they keep those workers down and also pay them less than minimum wage here in the USA.

Yes those jobs are needed by Hispanics, farmers, US business’s however many US high school kids would also love those jobs., also many retirees needing extra money. Now I’m getting side tracked a bit. I suppose what gets me is the 2.4 milllion jobs we have handed out overseas plus the issue here. The US needs tax payers to sustain our culture and continue to hire workers.

Yes I’m aware of some Medical opportunities there and I’m glad all kids are getting care. I once almost booked a dental vacation to Mexico to get veneers on my teeth for a fraction of the price here. Those medical vacations are also big business for your country. Liposuction, face lifts, dental crowns, etc.

This was just an idea to help both countries thrive. We are falling fast in the US and Europe. Things will easily trickle across the globe when more jobs are gone, The health Care plan kicks in, etc. Then we all have increased crime.
I enjoy hearing these cultural experiences. Ive been naïve I suppose.

The number of unauthorized immigrants went up about 45% between 2000 and 2009. Why? This is what I hope we can remedy. I don’t mind the company. I must say when I was 19 I would have taken a job on a farm. I don’t want people scared to leave their homes in Arizona.

Your right I think I remember reading something about “Mexican’s returning home for a better life” Like I said I may jump the border by 2016 if the US government doesn’t get their head out of their ars. I need to look up some recent numbers but a few years ago we had 2.2 foreign born Hispanic immigrants in the US. I know that most had a job. If I were to ad 2.2 and 2.4 overseas jobs it’s easy to see why the US has an extreme and inaccurate unemployment problem.

The weird thing I see now is people like you and I can sit here to try and solve things, where both cultures survive, yet our leaders have been taught to follow the money, and not be rational. Both governments need a slap of reality. I honestly didn’t sit down and try to think of other measure to solve this. What do you think would help both Countries prosper and flourish, other than my silly idea of giving all the overseas jobs to Mexico.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro

Originally posted by wonderworld
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I wish wealth upon the Mexican community, that alone may help the issues and offer more jobs! I'm really impressed. It shows how much I know; however I still wonder what draws many to the US when things are thriving there. Better pay but a higher cost of living?


Although my perception is that we have a lot here it requires a great job or several working in the household. For an unskilled worker that might work long hours and six days a week to make $200 - $400 dollars, if lucky, then compare that to similar hours working construction in the US, working harder and without complaint than most any American youth, and how far that $2,000 or more a month would go here, just figure it out.

edit on 18-11-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)


I see,, I understand,, Why my head is fixated on making Mexico "more" wealthy is more or less based on the fact I have lost faith in my own government. If you cant beat them join them. If the cars and manufacturing will be built overseas, and we have no chance in hell of having more built here, give the contracts to Mexico. Allow free travel back and forth for both US and mexican citizens. Do you kind of see where I'm coming from?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by wonderworld
 





The weird thing I see now is people like you and I can sit here to try and solve things, where both cultures survive, yet our leaders have been taught to follow the money, and not be rational. Both governments need a slap of reality. I honestly didn’t sit down and try to think of other measure to solve this. What do you think would help both Countries prosper and flourish, other than my silly idea of giving all the overseas jobs to Mexico.


I think the best thing the US could do is to start treating Mexico and the rest of Latin America as partners rather than step children. Beside being dictated to, Latin America has largely been ignored by the US and that has opened the door for Chuna. US should really look into the opportunities that exist in its own backtard.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by TucoTheRat
 


Thank you for that info!

There has been more than once i have considered selling my house. It was built in 2008. That money would buy me a mansion in Mexico and even dream of hiring a pool boy and still have a few hundred extra per month to live on. My house isnt a mansion just an average, modest, semi- middle class house Now that my teens moved out it's too big for me.

I am heading to check out Mexico real estate. Seriously! I wonder how hard it would be for me to legally move there. Do you know? What is the average price of a middle class home there and are they built to earthquake codes and regulations? Where would an Anglo be safest to move?

It's kind of like a person selling their house in New York and moving west. That money would buy 10 times the house over here. If things were reversed and my house was sitting in Manhattan I'd be considered very wealthy. We have a fund distrabution problem in the US and going socialist isnt the answer.

If Texas becomes a Country I may move there, if # hits the fan I'll jump the border and hope I dont get shot. Is it my imagination that Mexican citizens get shot trying to come here? Much of what I know is in fact incorrect I guess.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Is that a typo or is minimum wage really 5 bucks a day?? Not per hour?? I'm having a cultural awakening!





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