They Cracked This 250 Year-Old Code, And Found a Secret Society Inside

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posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 12:54 PM
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This is a good illustration of how not everything with the name "secret society" in front of it has to automatically be viewed as nefarious in my opinion. The world was not always as open and freethinking as it is now. There were times throughout history when people who wished to gather in common belief or even research, had to do so in seclusion to avoid persecution or being ostracized.

There was a time when Christianity might have been considered a "secret society." All the hallmarks were there. Cryptic language with parables used outwardly for the pubic, initiative circles of knowledge with only the inner sanctum revealing the "mystery." Elaborate symbolism and secretive writings explicitly intended to conceal dissenting views about the established order, so as to avoid persecution. The early church very much echoed earlier "mystery" religions or cults in my view, which many contemporary "secret societies" - many of which are viewed as shadowy conspirators - emulate to this day.

Not everything secret is a conspiracy. Some people just want privacy. Just my two cents.

Peace.
edit on 11/17/2012 by AceWombat04 because: Grammatical error




posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by ColAngus
Finally, an actual, honest to goodness conspiracy without FEMA camps, Nibiru, or other made-up nonsense.

Huzzah! S+F.


Made up nonsense? Wow, someone lives in the woods, under a log, under a rock with creepy crawlies and rarely gets out, even to feed. Surely you jest.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by bigrex

Made up nonsense? Wow, someone lives in the woods, under a log, under a rock with creepy crawlies and rarely gets out, even to feed. Surely you jest.


Yep. Made. Up. Nonsense.

I live in reality, not with a pack of wimpering, feral wolf children. Quit being a sociopath.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
Good Read. S&F

Will go further but for now, this of course caught my eye...



“To someone at the time,” he added, “this would be like reading a manifesto from a terrorist organization.”

and...


a place where nobleman and business people were welcomed and strict adherence to Christianity was not required.


Put these two bits of info together and we have a rather civilized band of Anarchists with no religious fanatics.

Thanks for the find...


Peace

edit on 16-11-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


Where do i sign ?



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Very interesting and a good read SF for you


Second line.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by ColAngus

Originally posted by bigrex

Made up nonsense? Wow, someone lives in the woods, under a log, under a rock with creepy crawlies and rarely gets out, even to feed. Surely you jest.


Yep. Made. Up. Nonsense.

I live in reality, not with a pack of wimpering, feral wolf children. Quit being a sociopath.
Hah, someone refuses to see the footage of the actual camps.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by bigrex
 


Someone is so paranoid that they see a conspiracy behind everything.

It's cool though. Go on living in fear of everything and everyone. Assume the worst. Enjoy the ulcers.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by Domo1
Pretending to be ophthalmologists in public but actually a secret society! The article goes on to explain a bit more about secret societies in the 18th century, how they were a place where nobleman and business people were welcomed and strict adherence to Christianity was not required. As the article states, this was dangerous for the powers at the time.



When I read this part, I couldn't help to think about all the opthamologists at the Bohemian grove. Look at the list here www.occupybohemiangrove.com...
edit on November 17th 2012 by Daughter2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 10:42 PM
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Has anyone not seen the recent jäger commercials where a bunch of men from different background coming together at a weird lodge? Seems pretty cultish to me



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by ColAngus
 





Someone is so paranoid that they see a conspiracy behind everything. It's cool though. Go on living in fear of everything and everyone. Assume the worst. Enjoy the ulcers.


It's not living in fear it is living in readiness. Being prepared for any eventuality is not being fearful it is being smart.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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Hey tin-foil hatters and doom preppers: no more thread raping please.

This thread is about the secret society in the OP, not your hoax of the month. Please take it over to Skunk Works.
.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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Is a book to follow?
Anyone?

Is there a book on this I can buy?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 03:26 AM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia
Is a book to follow?
Anyone?

Is there a book on this I can buy?


You can download the translation on page 1 of this thread...

Virus free also.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 06:06 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Excellent post what a riveting read. I wonder if that computer program could be used on an undeciphered text like say for instance the text from Easter Island I read somewhere that that language is still undeciphered?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 09:00 AM
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Originally posted by jude11


“To someone at the time,” he added, “this would be like reading a manifesto from a terrorist organization.”

and...


a place where nobleman and business people were welcomed and strict adherence to Christianity was not required.


Put these two bits of info together and we have a rather civilized band of Anarchists with no religious fanatics.

Thanks for the find...



Originally posted by AceWombat04
This is a good illustration of how not everything with the name "secret society" in front of it has to automatically be viewed as nefarious in my opinion. The world was not always as open and freethinking as it is now. There were times throughout history when people who wished to gather in common belief or even research, had to do so in seclusion to avoid persecution or being ostracized.
It should be noted, in case you didn't already know, the Bavarian Illuminati was pretty much the same, which is why they were demonized by the tyrants in power and the church of the day.

People hear "Illuminati" bandied about, and assume nefarious connotation. Why? Because they were anti-king and anti-church—both unpopular positions to take in the 1700s. They were enlightenment era freethinking proto-anarchists believing that man should govern himself and his relationship with God should be his own and not mediated by a priest. So they were shut down and even today most people assume they were "evil". Simply not true.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 09:17 AM
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cool stuff, could it be linked to freemasonary?



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by ~widowmaker~
 


If you read the linked article in full, you will find that some believe that the decyphered text, was a means to conceal the Freemasonry within it at a time when membership of Freemasonry was prohibited.

For your information;


Put yourself in a Mason’s shoes, Snoek explained. The Catholic Church has outlawed your order—and every other secret society. You don’t want to give up your Freemasonry, but you don’t want to be accused of sodomy. Even in a largely Protestant country like Germany, that was a withering accusation at the time. So “you hide it in a veil,” Snoek said. You start a new set of rituals, to layer on top of the old—and make it impregnable to Vatican attacks.

Perhaps the Oculists weren’t spying on Freemasonry so much as keeping it alive.

“As a Mason you are not allowed to write down—let alone publish—your rituals,” Snoek said. So how do you spread your ideas? You publish esoteric rites as if they are exposures—public outings of Masonry. Except you publish in code, so only an elite cadre of fellow Masons can read the dangerous things you have to say. And when your mission is over, you stuff all the evidence into a box that doesn’t get opened for nearly 150 years. The Oculists guarded and transmitted the Masons’ deepest secrets, Snoek believes, using a mixture of ritual, misdirection, and cryptography.


www.wired.com...

Given the fact that at that time Ophthalmology was an established and recognised specialism within medicine, there would be little need for a secret society to conceal it's methods and practices, it was after all taught in universities, it is perhaps more likely that the initiation described was a means to filter out those who would be sympathetic, or not, to the aims and objectives of another group.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by daaskapital


Steinheil, who had been initiated while en poste in London, was present in Grand Lodge in March 1741 at the election of the Earl of Morton as Grand Master, and gave one of the addresses. He was able to use his connections to gain post facto regularisation of his Frankfurt lodge. His 'sponsor' was one Bro Beaumont, oculist to the Prince of Wales. The Charter from the Grand Lodge of England, dated February 8, 1743, states that Beaumont having assured 'us that the Lodge had been constituted in due form under the name of Union, and as a daughter of the Union Lodge of London, we do hereby recognize it, etc and order that the members of either Lodge be equally considered members of the other.' So, however tentatively, we have a connection between a Philipp, an oculist and French Freemasonry (and hence the Scottish rites mentioned in Copiales).


www.opticianonline.net...


Taking the information you found above...and drawing it in parallel to this from the OPs linked article...


Back in Lund, Önnerfors grew surprised too as he continued to plumb the Copiale. In the midst of the descriptions about Oculist rituals, the document took a narrative turn. It described a meeting of “a few good friends” who talked about people’s desire to “know something only because it needs to be kept secret.” The friends decided to use this curiosity to play a little prank. They set up a fraternity and “would agree immediately as they would like to pretend that a great secret would be behind their unification.” They called this farce, this hoax, this grand psychological experiment Freemasonry. In other words, the Oculists were making an outrageous claim: that they founded Freemasonry … as a joke.


I wonder whether there is any connection to John Montagu...


He was a son of Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu and his first wife Elizabeth Wriothesley. His maternal grandparents were Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton and his first wife Rachel de Massue.

On 17 March 1705, John was married to Lady Mary Churchill, daughter of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough and Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough.

He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1719, and was a fellow of the Royal Society and a Grand Master of the Premier Grand Lodge of England. In 1739 the country's first home for abandoned children, the Foundling Hospital was created in London. Montagu was a supporter of this effort and was one of the charity's founding governors. He also financed the education of two notable Black British figures of the age, Ignatius Sancho and Francis Williams, sending the latter to Cambridge University.

He was a notorious practical joker, his mother-in-law writing of him that "All his talents lie in things only natural in boys of fifteen years old, and he is about two and fifty; to get people into his garden and wet them with squirts, and to invite people to his country houses and put things in beds to make them itch, and twenty such pretty fancies as these."[1]

He is said to have once dunked the political philosopher Montesquieu in a tub of cold water as a joke.[2]


en.wikipedia.org...

John Montagu's father, Ralph had been the patron of William Briggs, who had written the first major treatise of modern Ophthalmology.

If as suggested in the article, that there is some indication that there was some purpose to 'spy' by or on, those initiated, then Montagu's involvement would make some sense in the political context, given his opposition to the Habsburg domination of Europe, and to the HRE in general. It is as likely that they hoped to disturb the political balance merely by gaining the trust and confidence of those in rule by enticing them to join such a secret society. At the time many of the noble and merchant class were 'upset' over the way in which monarchs held trading rights amongst themselves, which limited and penalised private enterprise, and most notably at the time, the Ostend Company had been forced to cease trading under the Treaty of Vienna. I also wonder if the trial and execution of Joseph Oppenheimer, and the persecution of Jews in general may have had some sway.

More likely perhaps, was that this was another example of the covert means by which England was seeking the support of Germany, exampled in it's favouring the House of Hanover for succession to the throne, as a means of limiting the influence of Catholics, and thereby encroachment of both the HRE and Rome itself in English affairs. The trade rivalry between England, and Russia and France was also starting to gain serious momentum, and it was this that provided the real impetus behind the wars of succession that punctuated the 1700s.

One way or another, all very interesting, and great fun to ponder.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by JoshNorton
People hear "Illuminati" bandied about, and assume nefarious connotation. Why? Because they were anti-king and anti-church—both unpopular positions to take in the 1700s. They were enlightenment era freethinking proto-anarchists believing that man should govern himself and his relationship with God should be his own and not mediated by a priest. So they were shut down and even today most people assume they were "evil". Simply not true.


I think that to describe them as 'proto-anarchists' is misleading. I am sure that I have read, that at the time they favoured Constitutional Monarchism as a means of rule, where as Freemasonry favoured Enlightened Monarchism, hence the ideological schism. While Weishaupt may have been considered progressive for his time, he still believed in the existing structure of overlordship and class boundaries, and that any equality should be qualified by the understanding that some were 'more equal than others.'

He was by no means egalitarian, he simply believed that he, and his class, did not require rule, but that others, the vast majority of women included, did.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by ~widowmaker~
 


I'm wondering the same thing.





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