Microbullets reveal material strengths

page: 1
19
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 02:24 AM
link   

Microbullets reveal material strengths


news.rice.edu

Rice, MIT research could help maximize strength of body armor for soldiers, aerospace materials
In the macro world, it’s easy to see what happens when a bullet hits an object. But what happens at the nanoscale with very tiny bullets?
A Rice University lab, in collaboration with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and its Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, decided to find out by creating the nanoscale target materials, the microscale ammo and even the method for firing
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.youtube.com




posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 02:24 AM
link   
this stuff has potential applications in not just aerospace but even the auto industry and not just the windshields. though bulletproof and rock proof windshields would be great.

Bullet and puncture proof tires, lightweight doors and panels that take a hit and don't crunch. this would mean that cars and truck bodies and tires would be lighter weight than the petroleum based plastic alloy panels and rubber tires we use today. Lighter tires and lighter cars would mean that high-bred engines and electric cars could indeed run longer, further and efficiently.

This stuff has potential in other fields as well.

news.rice.edu
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 16-11-2012 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 10:54 AM
link   
Lightweight may be nice for the city, but not around here.

Too windy, smart cars have literally been blown off the roads into ditches before.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 10:58 AM
link   
Pretty cool stuff, and scary at the same time. It reminds me of the Indian in the Cupboard book series with micro bullets from small animated plastic military soldiers.Great find, thanks!

It is fascinating to see this kind of thinking going on and I'm sure given the resources and knowledge, anyone of us would probably enjoy "playing", er, experimenting on this scientific hypothesis.

Point aside, it's sad to see that this type of knowledge is being entertained. Fun and all for the ones involved, but of what value is the research, to whom, and to what ends would the knowledge be applied and for what future potential purpose? (Edit, ok yes I realized space travel shielding, but I am talking about Earth applications as they would probably be used more frequently on Earth than space.)
edit on 16-11-2012 by Philippines because: ETA: remembered space applications as edit shows =)



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 11:05 AM
link   
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Now that looks like some pretty cool stuff that has the potential to save a lot of lives through a lot of different applications.

Great find! F&S for the OP!



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 11:17 AM
link   
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Shame the patents will be bought up by the big hitters to stop this stuff becoming available, because longer lasting things means people spend less money.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 11:25 AM
link   
I remember reading much speculation back in the 80s about how one day nano thread materials would be produced for the military. They were discussing how one could theoretically create a T-shirt thin material to stop bullets but the big question was how to absorb the impact of the round.

Even with the new super wonder cloth the round would still impact hard enough to break bones - ribs etc. Then in an unrelated article around the same period I read how a Japanese company had just developed this wafer thin "Super shock absorbent" rubberized material.

They showed it absorbing a dropped bowling ball on a flat piece of 1/4" glass leaving the glass in one piece. It was said to also have extreme sound deadening properties as well.

You'd think that 33+ years later somebody would have by now put two and two together already....

edit on 16-11-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 12:07 PM
link   
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


It's all good until they create pico bullets that pierce nano fabric. Then maybe it will be yocto shards. There is no end.

If it's not one thing, it's another!
edit on 16-11-2012 by Gridrebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 01:06 PM
link   
Just wait for the nanotech plutonium body armor aerosol I will invent :p



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 03:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by ChesterJohn

this stuff has potential applications in not just aerospace but even the auto industry and not just the windshields. though bulletproof and rock proof windshields would be great.

Bullet and puncture proof tires, lightweight doors and panels that take a hit and don't crunch. this would mean that cars and truck bodies and tires would be lighter weight than the petroleum based plastic alloy panels and rubber tires we use today. Lighter tires and lighter cars would mean that high-bred engines and electric cars could indeed run longer, further and efficiently.

This stuff has potential in other fields as well.

news.rice.edu
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 16-11-2012 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)


All this is good but.. has the militery, or Gasp ... The CIA, yet looked at the application of these micro-bullets?
"microscale ammo and even the method for firing" Less than 1/10 the diameter of a human hair.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 03:17 PM
link   
There are great advances happening in technology these days.
This is pretty impressive stuff - along with the recent development of Graphene (and in case anyone doesn't know about this amazing material that is set to change the world we live in check out the Wikipedia article and this blog that keeps up on Graphene Info.

As the OP said, these materials (or meta-materials as I hear them being called) are set to drastically change what is possible in our lifetime. You have to realize that a lot of our current technology is limited to theoretical limits because the infastructure can't support it (ie current structures material, electronic components).

I for one am excited to hopefully get that AMAZING Hover-board we were all told about in Back To The Future



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 05:04 PM
link   
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Here are some new Tires, that claim all of what you say.

www.scientificamerican.com...



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 06:38 PM
link   
Nice find, S&F.
OK, let's flip the coin, shall we?
Imagine a weapon that fires nano-particles, say, ummmm....IRRADIATED particles. Poisonus, deadly, hard to detect....made of materials that are non-metal....a great assassination method. Secretly irradiating materials and making them toxic. Or a great way to sabotage equipment without actually destroying it outright. Weaken the structure and allow it to break down and fail over time, say, when you're half a world away. Or sabotage satellites and space vehicles....Planes.........OIL RIGS.
Holy $#!% I'd better stop giving DARPA and the CIA/DIA ideas !!!

Good find though, OP.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 08:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by chaztekno
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Shame the patents will be bought up by the big hitters to stop this stuff becoming available, because longer lasting things means people spend less money.



I know what you mean. It's amazing, and more than a little sad, to think of some of the impressive technologies we might be seeing today were it not for a few greedy pigs at the top of the heap trying to milk every last dollar they can out of their old, last-century technologies.

When you start to learn about planned obsolescence and suppressed technologies, one has to wonder just how often this has happened in our history. Most disturbing, I think, is I have heard of this happening in the field of medicine. I read somewhere a while back... can't quite recall where... the details are a bit fuzzy atm... but basically a small, newer company was making headway in terms of a cure or major treatment for cancer patients... and as they were on the verge of a breakthrough, or just after they made one, I forget which, they were bought out by a massive firm.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 12:35 AM
link   
Hey, without microscopic things you wouldn't be able to survive. It would only make sense to apply this same idea to weaponry. I.e. biological warfare et. al... What I find interesting about this story is they're testing copolymer polyurethane, which is alright and all, but what ever happened to graphene? Could graphene withstand these 'bullets'? I just find it useless, graphene is where it's at, for now at least. Even biological weapons still surpass these 'inventions'. I honestly expected something better from MIT and it's cohorts.


“We want to find out why this polyurethane works the way it does. Theoretically, no one understood why this particular kind of material – which has nanoscale features of glassy and rubbery domains – would be so good at dissipating energy,” he said.


Is this a serious question?? Have these people never took a simple biology class? The simple answer is surface area plus the structures of it's chemical bonds. I thought Rice & MIT were good universities this whole time. Then again, I used to think that way about my government too!. I guess it brings funding lol...



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:41 AM
link   

Originally posted by Philippines
Pretty cool stuff, and scary at the same time. It reminds me of the Indian in the Cupboard book series with micro bullets from small animated plastic military soldiers.Great find, thanks!

It is fascinating to see this kind of thinking going on and I'm sure given the resources and knowledge, anyone of us would probably enjoy "playing", er, experimenting on this scientific hypothesis.

Point aside, it's sad to see that this type of knowledge is being entertained. Fun and all for the ones involved, but of what value is the research, to whom, and to what ends would the knowledge be applied and for what future potential purpose? (Edit, ok yes I realized space travel shielding, but I am talking about Earth applications as they would probably be used more frequently on Earth than space.)
edit on 16-11-2012 by Philippines because: ETA: remembered space applications as edit shows =)


It would help in car panels in an accident it can absorb large amount of impact force and stop the damage to the car and its occupants. Also airplanes, trains, trucks just general transportation. Surfboards, parachutes, hunting vests. Oh here's a good one sports and military helmets. bullet proof street signs or how about baseball bat proof mail boxes. High rise building windows.

I was wondering what the largest size bullet would be. did they stop and 9mm? did they try 50cal? using it as coatings or as whole pieces.

I can't wait to see what the many applications this product will be used for.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 05:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by TKDRL
Lightweight may be nice for the city, but not around here.

Too windy, smart cars have literally been blown off the roads into ditches before.


are you talking So. California during santa ana winds?

The problem is you can hack a smart cars system and until they can keep that from happening I doubt smart car use will be of any use until it is as safe a possible to operate.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 11:33 AM
link   
I'd like to point out that this thread is about a material with properties of both glass and rubber, not microbullets. (Full disclosure, I came for the microbullets.)

The microbullets are a means of testing the material, not a weapon. They are accelerated with a laser, so as a weapon system it would have the same problems associated with lugging around all the equipment needed to shoot stuff with lasers.

The material, though, looks like it might be even more useful than the transparent aluminum in Star Trek IV.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 02:12 PM
link   
If anyone has read Liberty's Crusade - Jeff Grubb, there was a material they used called "Plasteel" as there 'glass'. This is a good thing.



Plasteel is a clear substance of terran design, akin to glass.[1] However, the "steel" suffix suggests that it is rather durable as well, especially in the context of neo and paristeel. It is known to be used on capital ships in the quarters of high ranking officers such as generals and admirals, allowing them a view into space. This is in contrast to other individuals, who are afforded no such luxury.[1] However, it appears that the glass windows of robo-harvester cabins are made of plasteel.[2]

edit on 17-11-2012 by AnonLover because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 02:15 PM
link   
reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


East coast canada, right on the ocean.





top topics
 
19
<<   2 >>

log in

join