China's New Boss or Puppet? Xi Jinping

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posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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Xi Jinping
ATS Special Report



Xi takes China's helm with many tough challenges

BEIJING (AP) — Long-anointed successor Xi Jinping assumes the leadership of China at a time when the ruling Communist Party is confronting slower economic growth, a public clamor to end corruption and demands for change that threaten its hold on power.


Who is Xi Jinping?

ATS member wildtimes posted a rather interesting story about how Bloomberg's news website was blocked by China's state censors a full month after it detailed the family of Xi Jinping as being immensely wealthy and very upper crust. China keeps up block on Bloomberg website. It seems the Chinese PTB are not too keen on the masses within China knowing all the details...


The country's political elite named Xi to the top party post on Thursday, and unexpectedly put him in charge of the military too, after a weeklong party congress and months of divisive bargaining.


This is an interesting development. He will also be in charge of the Military. China's Military hawks have over the years have been very vocal about their ambitions to be a "Super power" militarily. With all that has been taking place over the past few years with China jostling with their neighbors over resources, Mainly the Philippines, Vietnam and Japan just to name a few. How he handles their rhetoric and ambitious drive should be watched closely imho.


The appointments give him broad authority, but not the luxury of time. After decades of juggernaut growth, China sits on the cusp of global pre-eminence as the second largest economy and newest power, but it also has urgent domestic troubles that could frustrate its rise.


This is exactly the situation that many here, myself included, have been watching. China will have a tough time ahead. With rising inflation, slowing economic growth, social and political opposition. The crevasse between the Haves and the Have nots is much larger than in Western countries and continues to grow as the new Chinese middle and upper classes move forward while the rest flounder in the backwash of development which is a historically classic recipe for massive internal strife which appear to be on the rise.

Stay tuned on that one


Problems that have long festered — from the sputtering economy to friction with the U.S. and territorial spats with Japan and other neighbors — have worsened in recent months as the leadership focused on the power transfer. Impatience has grown among entrepreneurs, others in the new middle class and migrant workers — all wired by social media and conditioned by two decades of rising living standards to expect better government, if not democracy.


This shouldn't surprise many here about the idea of the political face of China changing towards a more Western form of Democracy. The Chinese in-spite of the Great Firewall have had a taste of Western Liberalism and as they say 'Once the Ginnie is out of he bottle it's impossible to put back'. Western music, movies, clothing styles etc etc etc have taken China by storm.

It seems natural to assume that this form of liberalism {If not crushed in another Tienanmen square type confrontation} will eventually prevail. Did Jinping need to be reeducated or indoctrinated into whats to be expected of him during his very infamous "Disappearance recently? Another ATS member longlostbrother brought this mystery to our attention in the posting of this thread China's "next President" hasn't been seen for 10 days, missed many meetings or as has been reported he has a possible tendency to step outside of his responsibilities and indulge in forum debates, role-playing games and gambling?




posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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China will have a tough time ahead.


Not so sure read that China will over take the US as the worlds largest economy withing the next 4ish years.

Xi Jinping sure would love vegas

Here it is:

www.guardian.co.uk...
edit on 15-11-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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thanks for posting .... been quietly following his appointment .. doesnt do china much good with the internet firewall - many chinese I know are very computer savvy and bypass it regularly



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:13 PM
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The primary reason I voted for Obama was my perception that he would be more effective in foreign policy, particularly in building on relations with China.

I could be wrong, but I don't think China is itching for war at the moment.

Take it for what it is, from China Daily.


The CPC's reaffirmation of its commitment to reform and opening-up, to which all the country's incredible achievements in the past 30-plus years are attributable, is of far-reaching significance for ensuring future development and a stronger nation.


While it could easily be propaganda masking less acceptable ambitions, I think for now China is content to perfect what they believe to be a superior model of government and economics, without threatening any foreign nations. All projections show that China will be the world's top economy in 20 years or so, there is not the usual desperation involved in aggression.

China's military build up is more likely because of the possibility that as China's economic influence begins to really challenge the US, they may face some kind of attack to prevent America from losing it's top spot.

I think their military is defensive, for now.

All indications are that China is genuinely progressing toward a more free and fair society, although they are committed to retaining elements of a command economy. Of course, this is what's on the surface and can't be trusted completely.


“Inside the party, there are many problems that need be addressed, especially the problems among party members and officials of corruption and taking bribes, being out of touch with the people, undue emphasis on formalities and bureaucracy and other issues,” Mr. Xi said.

He also pledged to improve citizens’ lives, including offering “better schooling, more stable jobs, more satisfying incomes, more reliable social security, higher levels of health care, more comfortable housing conditions and a more beautiful environment,” so they can “look forward to their children growing up in better circumstances, finding better work and living in better conditions.”

“People’s striving for a better life is the goal we are struggling for,” he added.
NY Times- Xi first speech after elected



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



This last bit. Before some start declaring WW-III will break out because of the latest hot air statements by some Chinese General remember, Most, if not all, will be rhetoric aimed towards their internal audiences to maintain a nationalistic unity. For those here who are not familiar with the tactic. If you keep the populous fearful they tend to stay united..

Sounds familiar eh?

I think you are spot on with this comment Slayer.
I know i am surprised as well.


My primary concern would be the (possible) Chinese Economic Reform, the globe is already teetering on the brink of another global recession, dare I saw depression and If Chinese economic policy differ significantly, it may push us over the edge. I have a feeling that Xi Jinping will want to play hard ball when it comes to China's economic role, but the country in itself is displaying signs of a rotten economic foundation. Will have to watch and see.

This topic should be getting more attention as this could have greater influence then other current global issues.



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edit on 15-11-2012 by MDDoxs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:37 PM
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That picture of him, makes it look as though he is wearing lipstick, well a cross dresser in the two major superpowers should make for some interesting espionage attempts on the presidents wardrobe.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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China has the same problems the rest of the world is facing. In the end, Xi Jinping will do what his comrades tell him to do.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 





China will have a tough time ahead. With rising inflation, slowing economic growth, social and political opposition. The crevasse between the Haves and the Have nots is much larger than in Western countries and continues to grow as the new Chinese middle and upper classes move forward while the rest flounder in the backwash of development which is a historically classic recipe for massive internal strife which appear to be on the rise.


A wealthy man who is head of a wealthy family, having control of communist China, now that is the imboddiment of irony. He already has monetary wealth and then he gets the executive powers of all China. We just might be seeing the first chinese emperor in a while. The gap may widen between the poor and upper and middle classes, but we're talking about a nation who has no problems squshing malcontent people down with tanks and steamrollers.

Using the U.S. as a model, even our poor have hard times making ends meet, primarily because all our manufacturing jobs have gone to China where they work pennies on the dollar for slave wages, but China has more poor then we do, in a nation flaunting over a billion people the poor class has got to be staggering.

The 2 major things wrong with the U.S. is #1 our jobs all moving to Asia via corporatism and #2 we see "Made in China" on product labels instead of "Made in the USA", but it's all good because when America becomes the poorest nation in the world, all those jobs will come flooding back. We may have to wait 100 years, but they will return.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by PatrickGarrow17
 





The primary reason I voted for Obama was my perception that he would be more effective in foreign policy, particularly in building on relations with China.


Personally I'd rather have the guy building relationships here instead of China. Some people have problems with cozying up to foreign bankers.

If this country had a better business environment they would not being pumping billions in China whereas this country could use them.
edit on 15-11-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


China economy has been prop mostly by Americas private interest in cheap labor, the American government turned a blind eye to the inequality in China while allowing the Chinese to built an economic empire with the power of money, thinking that eventually Democracy will gain roots from it.

Meanwhile America corporate interest in China forgot that China has always tried to overshadow Americas economy and has done that in an amazing record time.

But is one problem, the real power in China is not with the emerging wealthy class, but with the remaining communist powers behind the government.

I will not be surprise if Xi Jinping steeping out of the boundaries of his power would be found death, after all that is how the trouble makers are taking care off in communist countries.

Remember people regardless of who is in power is still a bigger power on top of that, just like in America we get a president but his powers are overshadow by those that really owns our nation, Wall Street, the Banks and the Fed.
Personally I don’t see Xi Jinping been a danger to Chinas power in any struggle that will result from his position.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


Americans see Made in China truth is ?

China was made in the USA.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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Xi Jinping is going to be a wild card. I was reading up on him the day this was announced. His father fell from favor and was sent to a distant province by the Communist Party. Xi Jinping still managed to rise up, but there is much speculation about where his core beliefs really lay.

One thing seems certain, based upon his "legends"... he's brilliant and highly skilled at motivating people. Now the question is just how purist he is vs how progressive he might be towards change.

Short of a coup, this man is going to be a powerhouse in world politics for the foreseeable future. What direction his influence will take remains to be seen.

He merits close, close watching.

~Heff



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Exactly, and you reap what you sowed, I have never trusted China and to this day I still don't trust China, this people are no stupid they have let US get into their nation but they go by the art of war teachings, you gain the enemies respect, you become like your enemies, you let you enemies think that they are in charge and then you strike back in the weakest point, time is in their side and not problem.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


Never seen China as the enemy see our own government as the biggest problem this country faces.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


You know me, I don't trust our nations government either because we have not control over the power that is ruling behind the White house.

Now as China, people can claim what they want, that is becoming like the western that an emerging middle class is been build but the truth is that is only two classes the very wealthy and the poor and a Democracy is nothing but a dream within a dream, China is as communist today as it was 10 years ago.

edit on 15-11-2012 by marg6043 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by MDDoxs
 


My Friend MDDoxs your statement below.


My primary concern would be the (possible) Chinese Economic Reform, the globe is already teetering on the brink of another global recession, dare I saw depression and If Chinese economic policy differ significantly, it may push us over the edge. I have a feeling that Xi Jinping will want to play hard ball when it comes to China's economic role, but the country in itself is displaying signs of a rotten economic foundation. Will have to watch and see.

China Economically is Strong, Also, it should be noted, Many, Many More Chinese people can afford to buy a car, Yes, there is a larger and better paid Chinese Middle Class and they're spending money.
A family friend living in Jilin, China, works for Toyota and sells new Toyota Cars.
The last four years he has averaged 11 to 14 new car sales a month and 3/4 of those sells are cash out the door.

How about Hong Kong, The headlines to days story is: Fifth Avenue No Longer The World’s Top Retail Address.
newyork.cbslocal.com...

How does the Dollar fair against the Chinese Yuan?
The Heads Lines are: The Chinese Yuan Has Hit Its Highest Level Since 1993.

“Funds are flowing back into the market as people bet China will soon act more aggressively to revive growth,” said Kenix Lai, a Hong Kong-based foreign-exchange analyst at Bank of East Asia Ltd. “There’s always expectations that the government will announce important polices before or at the end of a long holiday. The stock market is also rallying on stimulus bets.”

Read more: www.businessinsider.com...
You're correct, he will Play Hardball and do his best to make China next Economic Super Power.

edit on 15-11-2012 by guohua because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-11-2012 by guohua because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-11-2012 by guohua because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


From what I've been reading about this, not much is known about this mans ideology. I read in a couple of articles about there will be all new people within a few years due to the current groups ages. It's also mentioned it's odd for the leadership of the military to be turned over at the same time.

Sounds like China is reinventing it's leadership; likely due to the ages of those in power now. Probably in part due to China's embracing Capitalism so fully. I wonder if the guard change is not somehow connected to the beleif that China is headed for a far worse financial fall than anything the West has seen?

That much of what we hear out of Chinese Media is for internal consumption is a good point. Whenever a State controled media is the case it's not much more than a Propaganda wing. Even with a Free media it's manipulated no doubt.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


His ideology? well taking into consideration that his father was a communist revolutionary and a political leader we can pretty much know what he will be leaning too.

He is been prepped for this position and has been the favorite for a long time, so I don't believe that the powers behind Chinas government will allow a progressive in their communist chosen elite.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Fair enough. I see foreign relations as equally important as domestic policy. Our economies are tied together pretty tightly. This will only increase in the coming decades, so developing a stronger foundation for US-China relations is a high priority. I think domestic issues are more up to citizens, foreign policy is more in the hands of the government. Especially the executive branch.

Also, star on your China made in the USA comment. Pretty true.



Also like to add, as many here have indicated, the appointment of Xi probably doesn't mean a major change in policy. The majority of the Politburo Standing Committee, which collectively directs China, is still made up of Chinese conservatives.


China's ruling Communist Party unveiled an older, conservative leadership line-up on Thursday that appears unlikely to take the drastic action needed to tackle pressing issues like social unrest, environmental degradation and corruption.

New party chief Xi Jinping, premier-in-waiting Li Keqiang and vice-premier in charge of economic affairs Wang Qishan, all named as expected to the elite decision-making Politburo Standing Committee, are considered cautious reformers. The other four members have the reputation of being conservative.

The line-up belied any hopes that Xi would usher in a leadership that would take bold steps to deal with slowing growth in the world's second-biggest economy, or begin to ease the Communist Party's iron grip on the most populous nation.
from yahoo news

So, while pressure from the outside will most likely have China taking small steps in addressing their criticisms, it looks like we'll have pretty much the same China for the time being.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by PatrickGarrow17
 





Our economies are tied together pretty tightly.


Had enough of globalism, and globalists one goes down they all do it is the same thing as creating a dependency based society they are one in the same.





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