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'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

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posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by 0mage
 


ERrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. I dunno, it's very possible that the 100year old pulse of light we discovered this planet with, would most definitely mean the planet is not in the same location. However, for it to be closer, it would also be easier to discover. There seems to be a whole heck of a lot of info scientists can discern from a simple reflection. For instance if they no the source of the light, they can calculate the distance, as well as size, even density and composition in some cases.

I Like to think, if in the 100 years it took that light to get to us, if the planet were closer, we would see the movement of the planet, in an almost fast forward type motion. As the planet gets closer, it takes less time for the light to arrive to us. So if the planet was moving fast enough for it to say arrive at the cockbull 2012 end date, it would appear to be hurtling towards us at an amazing speed. Likely so quick you could not get an image of the object. Assuming it was traveling close to the speed of light of course. Otherwise, I don't see it getting here unnoticed.




posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 



Rogue planet is overstating the case, from the article I read. It is apparently in a zone of a number of new star that relatively recently formed. This one, four times bigger than Jupiter, isn't big enough to become star, and perhaps it will be pulled into the orbit of oen of the nearby stars.



posted on Nov, 16 2012 @ 03:26 PM
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This is an interesting discovery. I will try to find out more. You will hear from me in possibly two or three days.



posted on Nov, 17 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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I've heard people asking if it could hit Earth, but I'm like "its 100 light years away!" Thats really far, and even if it did come close it would be way off into the future.



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by Hijinx
reply to post by 0mage
 


ERrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. I dunno, it's very possible that the 100year old pulse of light we discovered this planet with, would most definitely mean the planet is not in the same location. However, for it to be closer, it would also be easier to discover. There seems to be a whole heck of a lot of info scientists can discern from a simple reflection. For instance if they no the source of the light, they can calculate the distance, as well as size, even density and composition in some cases.

I Like to think, if in the 100 years it took that light to get to us, if the planet were closer, we would see the movement of the planet, in an almost fast forward type motion. As the planet gets closer, it takes less time for the light to arrive to us. So if the planet was moving fast enough for it to say arrive at the cockbull 2012 end date, it would appear to be hurtling towards us at an amazing speed. Likely so quick you could not get an image of the object. Assuming it was traveling close to the speed of light of course. Otherwise, I don't see it getting here unnoticed.


so basically.. stating that the planet is 100 light years away is incorrect. because we're seeing it late. we would have to plot it's velocity and direction as a moving point and then negate the lapse in time from 100 light years to calculate the actual distance. which if it were heading in our direction would be closer.

in summary.. all these calculations could be 'cockbull' LMAO

also it is claimed our sun is also moving thru space at the magnificent pace of 487,383 mph.

how fast would it get here if our sun was also heading towards it?
edit on 18-11-2012 by 0mage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2012 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by 0mage
 

In the 100 years it took the light to get here, that planet couldn't have moved much far. I don't know its exact proper motion, but it isn't close to light speed. In fact, this planet is thought to be part of the AB Doradus moving group, which is moving at a few km/s. en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 19 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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I'm back with an answer. We're not going to be hit. That's all they'll tell me.





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