'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

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posted on Nov, 14 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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How did they find a planet with no star? I thought they had to use the star to find the planets, check for the wobble and such. The planets give off no light, so I wonder how they found it.

I also thought there are only 500 or less confirmed planets found, the rest is speculation. ?




posted on Nov, 14 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by jough626
I also thought there are only 500 or less confirmed planets found, the rest is speculation. ?


I really hope you're not serious



posted on Nov, 14 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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reply to post by blindlyzack
 


He probably is. As of right now, around ~800 exoplanets have been confirmed, however there are thousands of candidates that are pending confirmation. It's assumed that 80% of the candidates will be in the affirmative of a exoplanet.
edit on 14/11/12 by shadowland8 because: (no reason given)
edit on 14/11/12 by shadowland8 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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Originally posted by blindlyzack

Originally posted by jough626
I also thought there are only 500 or less confirmed planets found, the rest is speculation. ?


I really hope you're not serious


Instead of being rude you could attempt to share that which you're implying that you know.

@jough I would imagine it would be easier to visually spot a rouge planet with no sun than a similar planet orbiting the star. It is the parent star's enormously bright light which makes it incredibly hard to see planets in a distant solar system. Out in the void I would imagine a planet could reflect enough light to be observed via a telescope.
edit on 15-11-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 12:26 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
If we can spot one that far away, I think we should be able to find one that was, I don't know, close enough to crash into earth? Seems logical to me at least.


Though that is true, most planets are discovered by transit or reflected light from their parent star. However, since this planet is rouge then it could not be found by these effects. Instead it was found on the infra-red spectrum, and that is only because it is a gas giant 3-4 times the size of Jupiter. however, if it was a small rocky planet, with a low-reflective surface, then I am sure it could get relatively close before it was discovered. Relative to the distances of space of course. We would still have plenty of time to know if it were heading toward our solar system. Even if it were, the chances of an impact with earth are miniscule.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 12:31 AM
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Originally posted by jough626
How did they find a planet with no star? I thought they had to use the star to find the planets, check for the wobble and such. The planets give off no light, so I wonder how they found it.


Well, they found it using the infrared spectrum. It was a gas planet 3-4 times the size of Jupiter with an average temp of 806 degrees F.


Delorme and his team detected CFBDSIR2149's infrared signature using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, then examined the body's properties with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile.


www.space.com...



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 12:34 AM
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Originally posted by Renegade2283
with an average temp of 806 degrees F


That sounds pretty warm for being so far out in the black

Do gas giants generate their own heat? It could explain how Neptune can generate thousand mph windstroms while getting much much less sunlight than Jupiter.
edit on 15-11-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by Shminkee Pinkee

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum

'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away


www.bbc.co.uk

Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away.

The proximity of the new rogue planet has allowed astronomers to guess its age: a comparatively young 50-120 million years old.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Beat me to it :-)


LOL. . .same here. I thought, ahhh, I finally have something for my very first post. I will have to keep on looking.


S&F for the OP



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by Renegade2283

Originally posted by jough626
How did they find a planet with no star? I thought they had to use the star to find the planets, check for the wobble and such. The planets give off no light, so I wonder how they found it.


Well, they found it using the infrared spectrum. It was a gas planet 3-4 times the size of Jupiter with an average temp of 806 degrees F.


Delorme and his team detected CFBDSIR2149's infrared signature using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, then examined the body's properties with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile.


www.space.com...


Ahh, thanks for the info, I was just about to ask how the heck did they find it without seeing the change in a star?



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by RiverRunsFree
 

Originally posted by RiverRunsFree

I posted this news earlier in a different thread - www.abovetopsecret.com...

Reason for mentioning this was because the thread I posted in was based on a guys prediction Niburu would be spotted on the 14th November. Not a bad prediction considering this is a wondering planet spotted on the 14th November.
I'm sure that the first thought they had immediately after the discovery, was [color=B2D6AE]"We Have Got To Get This Posted On ATS, ASAP!!!" [color=707070]/end sarcasm


The BBC article that is linked to in the OP, gives a link to something apparently from the Cornell University Library, that provides some of the details regarding this find. It says those details (which all look Greek to me, so I'm not gonna post them) were 'Submitted on 1 Oct 2012'. I assume that they probably first discovered it even earlier.








Originally posted by magma

Was this news released on the 14th by any chance?
nope. ↑↑





edit on 11/15/12 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 


There was a guest on Coast to Coast with Art Bell many many moons ago, that said there literally thousands of the types of planets or celestrial bodies, and he if my memory serves me correctly said that there is a real not nessassarily a high probablity, that one could enter our solar system, at the very least come near it. This is not saying it would be Nibiru. This does however leads creedence to the theory however.

Grim



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 07:48 AM
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How far out into space does a planets gravity project? I wonder if a planet is big enough even if it is 100 light years away would the gravity waves of the planets in our solar system start to get interference from the rogue planets gravity... Could someone clarify for me I am not that clued up on orbital mechanics thanx...



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 07:50 AM
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It's not a "rogue planet" its a giant space station moving around eating up solar systems for resources !

I can just see it now



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by cookiemonster32
 


Well it really depends on the planets size , if you take the sun for example , many thousands of times greater than the size of earth ! Look at its gravitational pull on objects within the heliosphere , if you then look at the size of the suns heliosphere and then take into consideration the planets size , then it would be a quick calculation of the mass , then im sure you could figure out its gravitational pull !


Astronomers define the Solar System as the distance under the influence of gravity from the Sun. We know that the Sun holds distant Pluto in orbit (5.9 billion km away on average). But astronomers think that the Oort Cloud extends out to a distance of 50,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from the Earth to the Sun), or 1 light-year. In fact, the influence of the Sun’s gravity could extend out to 2 light-years away, the point at which the pull from other stars is stronger. Surface gravity of the Sun: 27.94 g"


Im pretty sure that the planet would actually have to be within or coming really close to entering our solar system before we could see any of the potential effects to the other planets

With such large bodies such as Jupiter / Saturn and the Sun , the rogue planet would likely interact with these first , in a sense we are lucky to have Jupiter and Saturn to protect us from alot of wayward asteroids and meteorites



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by sapien82
 


Cool thanks for the info it is a little clearer to me now.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


Good ol Uncle Heff always ready with a zinger!



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by sapien82
 


Galactus maybe?



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by Q2IN2Y
 


I thought CFBDSIR2149-0403 was quite catchy



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 

Can Sarah Palin see if from her home in Alaska?



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 


That's no moon. It's a space station xD





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