What the... Is this what Kindergarteners learn?

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posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 08:41 PM
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Ok. My sister recently got a couple questions regarding a book she was supposed to read in class. Keep in mind this is Kindergarten....

1. What is the problem proposed in the story?

2. Can you name an alternative for the solution in the story?

3. What are the characters in the story?

4. What is the setting of the story?

5. Did you like this story? If so, what did you like about it? Would you recommend this to a friend?

Are these the questions K-ers are supposed to answer these days? Also, there are actually 12 questions in total, and she has to answer ALL of them. These aren't just her questions, they were given to the whole class. And I think she gets one like this every week, I believe.




posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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Depends. What book did she have to read? A 6 year old ought to be able to answer those questions about Green Eggs and Ham, but I wouldn't expect as much if they were assigned War and Peace.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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Well, not to play the devils advocate here, but my son is also in Kindy and he does not bring home questions of this calibre.

Is it too much of an ask to answer these questions?

It certainly could be without the direct guidance of the parent(s) but I would welcome these sorts of questions if nothing more than to hone the analytical skills of my lad.

I see a general decline (dumbing down) of the education of our children in general. In the case of Kindy its all about the pretty pictures and nice story and thats about it.

If our children are being taken to task with questions of this nature, it may not be too bad in the long run.

I take it that these are generic questions which can be asked of any story that the kids read?

Could you post the remaining 7 questions - I would be very interested in seeing the extent of what they are being asked.

Personally, I believe that the more our children are required to "think" the better off they will be.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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I fail to see the problem here. Is it that you feel analyzing a story is too much for a child of that age?
I just don't understand what's wrong here...



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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At least she wasn't reading the Prince and the Prince/ or Princess and Princess.............. YET.......



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by jheated5
 


Blatant. Bigotry is blatant.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by mr10k
 

Yes it's shocking that they expect more and more out of the very young these days.
My son is in 2nd grade, when he was in 1st they had him do not just 1 but 2 "book reports". General outlines of the story but still it was a lot for such little kids. And what's sad is that parents want this more and more too.
I think educators forget that kids this age need learning to be fun and not have such high expectations.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by boot2theface
reply to post by jheated5
 


Blatant. Bigotry is blatant.


What is bigoted about attempts at social conditioning of children?



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by obnoxiouschick
 


I fail to see the problems with any of this. From the responses I'm seeing here i get the feeling people want their children to be dumbed down. When I was that age...(My god did I really just type that) I was doing book reports and things of the like. I believe I did a report on Mark Twain in 1st grade.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by jheated5
 


Children NEED to be conditioned for social life. It's called raising them...



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by obnoxiouschick
reply to post by mr10k
 

Yes it's shocking that they expect more and more out of the very young these days.
My son is in 2nd grade, when he was in 1st they had him do not just 1 but 2 "book reports". General outlines of the story but still it was a lot for such little kids. And what's sad is that parents want this more and more too.
I think educators forget that kids this age need learning to be fun and not have such high expectations.


I don't agree here at all. The schools in America suck compared to a lot of other countries. While school should be an enjoyable learning experience for children, playtime is for at home. Teachers are there to teach. What I think a lot of parents don't like is having to help their children accomplish things like book reports at home after a hard days work. Unfortunately, that is one of the responsibilities that comes along with being a parent.

I think it's great that even at kindergarten level that the child in the OP is being challenged.
edit on 12-11-2012 by Sissel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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I think it is perfectly fine. Kids can be smarter than some people give them credit for.

If you teach them critical thinking young, it won't be a challenge for them later on.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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Kindergardeners are much smarter than you give them credit for. While The Good Earth may be a little much for the age (in my school, it was 3rd grade reading), a 5 year old should be able to answer these questions no problem. Problems with this could indicate developmental delays.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by obnoxiouschick
reply to post by mr10k
 

Yes it's shocking that they expect more and more out of the very young these days.
My son is in 2nd grade, when he was in 1st they had him do not just 1 but 2 "book reports". General outlines of the story but still it was a lot for such little kids. And what's sad is that parents want this more and more too.
I think educators forget that kids this age need learning to be fun and not have such high expectations.

Not 1 but 2? Oh my, your poor baby! What's sad is your response, not that other parents see 2 book reports a YEAR as fine.
You are all insane...



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by boot2theface
 


I don't want my kids "dumbed" down that wasn't my point.

Great. I'm so impressed that you wrote a report on Mark Twain in 1st grade.

Do you have kids?

Before I had kids I worked with behavioral children for about 6 yrs.

Now I live in an area where parents like to "impress" other parents with how excelled their child is at reading, math, etc. They load up the kids with structured time and do not allow for recreational "alone" time. That is essential for fostering creative thinking.

Pressure for achievement at a young age can actual deter young kids from wanting to learn. They see that parents just want results and produce results but for the wrong reasons.

Also there are studies done that reflect that kids who are told "you're smart" actually stop trying.
I could site this from the book "Nuture Shock" by Po Bronson www.nurtureshock.com... all the research info on the studies they write about are in the back of the book. I'd have to dig around for my copy.

My point was ease up people. My goodness they are not mini adults they are children.
edit on 11/12/2012 by obnoxiouschick because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Reading is very important for children at a young age. So is thinking about what they're reading. That school is on the right track. Be glad that your child is learning how to use their brain.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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Wow, they're making my 5-year-old niece (whose in Kindergarten) practice memorizing her ABCs, and pronounce words. I dunno, that questionnaire about a book does seem a bit 'ahead' for Kindergartners. Maybe they should've re-wrote the questions with Kindergarteners in mind, and left out words like like 'proposed,' and 'alternative.'
edit on 12-11-2012 by Shaxuul because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by Shaxuul
Wow, they're making my 5-year-old niece (whose in Kindergarten) practice memorizing her ABCs, and pronounce words. I dunno, that questionnaire about a book does seem a bit 'ahead' for Kindergartners. Maybe they should've re-wrote the questions with Kindergarteners in mind, and left out words like like 'proposed,' and 'alternative.'
edit on 12-11-2012 by Shaxuul because: (no reason given)


Why again? If a child doesn't understand the words proposed, and alternative, it might be fun to sit down with Mom or Dad and look them up in the dictionary.

Maybe that could be an "alternative" to playing a game, or perhaps the parents could "propose" time to play on the computer after homework is finished.

See how easy it would be to get even a 5 year old to learn those words?



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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Nope... I see nothing wrong with those questions at all. Critical, analytical thinking and reading comprehension are things that should be taught in school. Nothing wrong with mental exercise.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by obnoxiouschick
 

That could be because "being smart" will make you an outcast in this society. I happen to believe that is why no matter how much money or teachers we throw at our kids they will continue not to learn. The culture has to change to one that "being smart" is something to be looked up to rather then being looked down on. Kids are social animals as well.





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