I was wondering why there is no pets forum

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posted on Nov, 11 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by WoodSpirit
 


That is the exact reason BTS exists.




posted on Nov, 11 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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only if it's related to the half man half cat experiments & other animal experiments in area 51



posted on Nov, 11 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


I have a question

I have a 55gallon tank, with 4 electric yellow cichlids and 1 jewel cichlid.
Had five electric yellows but one just died hrs ago, earlier in the day,I seen the fish on the bottom of the tank leaning on a rock breathing heavy.
I had 8 goldfish in the tank also, I've since removed them.

The tank has only been set up for over a week. With tap water .
I am getting "start right" right now, and ammonia tablets, then removing 15galllons of water.

I don't own a test kit yet, the guy I bought the fish off of, says my tank has not been through a safe cycle yet.
He thinks the ammonia level is to high.
He even offered to keep my fish safe till my tank is up to par! He breeds these fish FYI.

Anything your have to share would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance " Matt"


Edit: just bought all the items , so before starting water change I tested the water the ammonia was in caution zone, and the second electric yellow died...

edit on 11-11-2012 by Sippy Cup because: update



posted on Nov, 11 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


Well since you asked, we do manage to get in photos or videos of pets owned by ourself or others at various times. For example I really like this video which I posted previously in the chit chat forum. Since it is Veteran's Day today, I think it is appropiate to post it again, and say thanks to all veterans, past and present, for your service!




edit on 11/11/2012 by manta78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 06:06 AM
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reply to post by Sippy Cup
 





I have a question I have a 55gallon tank, with 4 electric yellow cichlids and 1 jewel cichlid. Had five electric yellows but one just died hrs ago, earlier in the day,I seen the fish on the bottom of the tank leaning on a rock breathing heavy. I had 8 goldfish in the tank also, I've since removed them. The tank has only been set up for over a week. With tap water . I am getting "start right" right now, and ammonia tablets, then removing 15galllons of water.


5 fish, 40 gallon and the two trains will collide after 33 minutes.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


This thread here was the net result of the request for a pets forum. After a few back and forths with the Mods it was decided the best way was to post in General Chit Chat under the name [PETS] with any thread dedicated to pets and animals.

Not sure if the idea grew wings or stalled, I did see a few threads but if you search pets it should come up with animal specific threads under General Chit Chat.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by Sippy Cup
reply to post by lonegurkha
 


I have a question

I have a 55gallon tank, with 4 electric yellow cichlids and 1 jewel cichlid.
Had five electric yellows but one just died hrs ago, earlier in the day,I seen the fish on the bottom of the tank leaning on a rock breathing heavy.
I had 8 goldfish in the tank also, I've since removed them.

The tank has only been set up for over a week. With tap water .
I am getting "start right" right now, and ammonia tablets, then removing 15galllons of water.

I don't own a test kit yet, the guy I bought the fish off of, says my tank has not been through a safe cycle yet.
He thinks the ammonia level is to high.
He even offered to keep my fish safe till my tank is up to par! He breeds these fish FYI.

Anything your have to share would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance " Matt"


Edit: just bought all the items , so before starting water change I tested the water the ammonia was in caution zone, and the second electric yellow died...

edit on 11-11-2012 by Sippy Cup because: update


well the fact that the tank is new means that the nitrogen cycle is not established. If you fed the fish and even if you didn't their waste will cause an ammonia spike. As the first stage nitrifying bacteria become established, this can take up to two weeks, They will convert the ammonia to nitrites which are also poisionous. As that level rises the second stage nitrifying bacteria will become established. This stage will convert the nitrites to nitrates, which are much less harmful. Once both stages are established (this can take up to a month) the nitrifying bacteria in the tank and filter will take care of converting the waste from the fish into a form which is better tolerated by the fish.
This is why water changes are recommended occasionaly, to remove that final product of the natural nitrogen cycle.What you are experiencing is refered to as new tank syndrom. You may notice a cloudyness in the tank.

The problem was probably caused by the goldfish. being herbavoirs, they generate alot of ammonia waste. Truthfully they are not compatable with africans. Gold fish like lower temperatures, and africans like high temps up to 80 or 82 degrees. The jewel won't like the same temps either as they hail from the african river system, not the lakes like your electric yellows. I assume that the electric yellows are a Malawi cichlid.Since that is a generic name I'll guess that they are these guys link

If they are , I have a tank of them now and at least 2 of my females have a mouthful of eggs. They spawned last friday and saturday.

Now here's a trick for you to keep the waste in the tank under control once the nitrogen cycle is established. I have done this for many years and it adds a nice natural cover to the tank.I put philodendron cuttings in the back of the tank. Just hang the cuttings over the back of the tank with the cut end in the water.After a short while the cuttings will root and they will start to prosess the final waste products of the nitrogen cycle. This will cut down on the amount of water changes you will have to make.

As the plants grow you can cut them back and start new ones.Or you can train them to grow around the room. Nice natural waste control. Matt feel free to contact me anytime and I will try to help. Once your tank has become established things will settle down and it will become easier to take care of.Also once you have one established tank, other tanks, if you want more, will be easier to establish. I can show you some tricks to make it easier.So stick with the first one it will get better.Many people give up when they have trouble getting the first one going. It just takes a little time. Biology takes time to get going



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


Thanks for your advice
That link is exactly what my electric yellows look like,or looked like they all are dead now.
That jewel is still going strong, and its been in the tank days before the yellows.
heck the jewel I got apparently had not been fed for weeks, so I named him " bear" after " bear grylls" he is a survivor.
I watched a few of the fish suck at the top as for air, the tank has a bubbling stone and a filter.

The water is slightly cloudy.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by Sippy Cup
 

Well since he survived . You can use him to cycle the tank. The others were at the top before dying cause of the ammonia level. It was burning their gills and is probably why they died.

For the next little while feed spareingly,or not at all ....fish can go a long time without food once they have a round belly. The food will decompose and pollute the tank.Do a 50% water change immediately. As the tank biology starts to cycle the cloudyness should disappear. That will mean that the tank is starting to establish itself.Remember this can take up to a month in a new tank. Just because the tank clears doesn't always mean that the process is done.Best to wait two weeks beyond the clearing to add fish and then only add a couple at a time, so you don't overload the new biology. Once well established, you can add more as the biology catches up with the waste load.

You may have to do a water change often as a couple of times a day till the biology is established.Keep an eye on the cloudyness and If it seems to get worse do a change. Don't worry this stage doesn't last forever.



posted on Nov, 12 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


It's a 55 gal tank lastnight I took out 15gal should I still do a 50% water change?



posted on Nov, 13 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Sippy Cup
 


I would, A large change will help the ammonia level.As the first nitrifying bacteria begin to establish themselves the tank will begin to clear, but that doesn't mean that the second level of bacteria is established. The first level converts ammonia to nitrites and that level will begin to rise. These substances are dangerous to the fish as is ammonia. As the second level of nitrifying bacteria establish the nitrite level will drop and the nitrate level will rise. The second level takes a bit longer than the first level to become established.

There are only two ways I know of to rid the tank of nitrates. One is a 20% water change about every two to three weeks. The other is to grow live plants as I said above. Either hanging outside the tank like I previously described or growing plants in the tank. Lots of them, the more the better. Nitrates are plant food. The solid fish waste provides phosphorous as well, also plant food.As these levels rise, you may start to see algea start to form. This you can remove. At this time it would be a good idea to cut down on the light in the tank as this will inhibit the algea growth.

As your plants get established the levels of waste chemicals that can be used by algea and the plants will start to drop. The plants will start to use those chemicals. When the plants are using most or all those chemicals, the tank will be well established and at that time you can do pretty much anything you want with it. It will reach a point of biological balance. Now that doesn't mean that water changes will stop. There are other chemicals that plants can't process and are not a part of the nitrification process.

These chemicals will build up much more slowly with the plants established and the nitrogen cycle working. So keep up the changes. I usually do a change on a massive level(as much as two thirds of the tank about once every two months. My tanks have been established for many years though. Although I do have one that was just set up last week. I used a few tricks I know and used already established plants and filter. Even though this tank is new, the established biology I added is keeping the cycles under control and the tank is crystal clear and healthy. The fish are breeding already. So hang in there as time passes the tank will establish itself and when the process is complete you will have a very nice tank for the fish you want to keep.

When you're ready to add fish contact me and let me know what you want to add. I'll let you know if they are compatable. If you have any questions don't hesitate to contact me. LG



posted on Dec, 29 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by lonegurkha
 


Just wanted to give you and update and a big thanks for your advice "THANKS"

Well the tank has been up and running since the last time I posted and everthing is working out great.
Last month I moved and the tank had to be transported 15 miles, which I was so not looking forward to because the tank just had become established.
Anyway I got 8 five gallon buckets and saved that water for the trip and left just enough water in the tank to keep the gravel wet.

Waited a week and tested the water and it came out perfect


Now the stock I added after that

5 electric yellows 3-4"
1 jewel 1-2" (there has always been the 5" jewel in the tank) so 2 jewels now
2 Acei's 1"
2 Ob peacocks 2"
2 frontosa's first one 1" second one 5"

All are doing good now for about 3 weeks
The two Acei cichlids have some tail damage from being picked on and one of the Ob peacocks has some tail and upper fin damage.
Now the Ob peacock with the damage was being aggressive so I think he was being "checked" by the large jewel who is dom in the tank.
one of the two Acei's had ick which I treated with meds and got rid of it.( read raising the temp works also)
After that I noticed both had some tail damage, but those two fish are very small but still go near the large jewel and his area A LOT , still do. So I just don't know if they are dumb or just crazy.

That's it. Thanks for your help and advice in my quest on my African tank.

Edit:
O and the tank has lots of plants ( working on growing live from bulbs )
and plenty of hiding places and cover.
edit on 29-12-2012 by Sippy Cup because: add some info



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by Sippy Cup
 


Congradulations on your sucessful move with your tank. That's always a challenge,You did great.Good idea taking your water with you.




5 electric yellows 3-4"
1 jewel 1-2" (there has always been the 5" jewel in the tank) so 2 jewels now
2 Acei's 1"
2 Ob peacocks 2"
2 frontosa's first one 1" second one 5"



Now for your stock, The yellows are one of the more docile mbuna from Malawai,I keep these myself and have for many years.They will have problems with the Acei and the peacocks as these are more aggressive. You will need to provide them with lot's of caves,Plenty of hiding places will cut back on the aggression,and allow them to get away from the more aggressive peacocks and acei.these guys can all get along if given enough hiding places.

The jewels are very aggressive and are riverine cichlids from africa.They actually need different water conditions from the mbuna. Malawai is hard akaline water and the rivers of africa are soft and acidic.There are several species referred to as jewels,so without knowing which one you have,I don't know how aggressive yours will be. However when they get ready to spawn the jewels,and this goes for all of them,will become the fish from hell. They will become aggressive to the point of killing everything in the tank. Even much larger fish.They really need a tank to themselves as they are so very aggressive. They could be the ones that are doing the fin nipping that you are seeing.

The frontosa are from Lake Tanginyika,Tangantika cichlids are my specialty. I have alot of them ,but they are mostly the dwarf species at this time. I keep mostly shell dwellers as I like their social interaction.I have 6 or 8 spawns being raised right now.Nice little clouds of babies surrounding the spawning shells.Now that said, the frontosa will get to about 12 inches and will become more aggressive as they grow. These fish really need a large tank of at least 100 gallons or more.

So the mbuna can be made to get along with enough hiding places.My tank is completely full of stones arranged to provide as many caves as possible.Recently I had a group of keneyii in the tank with my yellows and had alot of problems with their aggressive behavior.So I got rid of them and sold them to my favorite fish store. The owner is a longtime friend and buys fish from me often.He was happy to recieve two breeding groups of a male and two females.

I would recommend that you sell the frontosa as they will get to big and aggressive for the size tank that you have. The jewels would do fine by themselves if you can get them a 20 gallon long and provide caves for them.if you don't have space for another tank ,then I would recommend that you get rid of them as they are gonna cause problems. If you can set up another tank then write me a u2u and I'll give you some tricks you can use to accelerate the biology in the new tank.





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