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700+ Bookstores Boycott a Cookbook

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posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:00 AM
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"The 4-Hour Chef is being boycotted by 700+ bookstores across the United States, led by Barnes & Noble"
I am a real book worm so this may be less interesting to most.
This particular book is a cook book. It's not even being released until next month but has already been boycotted by 700 stores headed up by B&N.
Ostensibly it is simply a ploy by the bookstores to head off what is projected to be a best seller on e-book.
I find it curious that the brick and mortar stores see this as a realistic business model.
I wonder if they are actually targeting the individual author or if it is an attempt to target e-books as a whole.
Smacks of stupidity.
Now I won't be in B&N picking up a copy of this book and purchasing the usual five or six other books that I would typically have purchased.
Is this financial censorship?
Is it a legitimate marketing ploy?
My feeling is that it will ultimately bite brick and mortar stores in the butt.

A mundane little conspiracy to be sure but it's still about manipulating how we get our information so I thought it was worth a look.




posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:09 AM
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reply to post by badgerprints
 


Source? Where did you get this information?




posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:16 AM
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daily report

Maybe this link will help shed some light on the op.

It would seem that traditional book stores, brick and mortar if you will, see amazon's venture into print and e-book sales as a threat to their livelihood.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:31 AM
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Brilliant.... then they wonder why they lose business ....



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:46 AM
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Originally posted by Seiko
daily report

Maybe this link will help shed some light on the op.

It would seem that traditional book stores, brick and mortar if you will, see amazon's venture into print and e-book sales as a threat to their livelihood.


As an author that publishes on Amazon books and ebooks, I can say that Amazon, in particular, has an amazing set of resources and compensation plans in place for authors.

They also make it extremely easy to publish and, perhaps more importantly, get paid for writing good books. They are also, frankly, making one HECK of a profit from doing it all.


With that in mind, stores that want to try to complain about such a business model need to look at their own, instead, and ask the important question : What are they doing that we are not?

Boycotting and complaining does your business absolutely no good, beyond a self-serving ego boost. In the end, it's likely going to lose you customers that would have, otherwise, chosen to shop with you.

If they have a problem with how Amazon is doing business, they should implement plans and policies of their own that can compete.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 06:50 AM
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Let me add to my above post by saying, if a company finds itself being placed into a status of irrelevancy because they are unwilling to change their business practices to suit changing times and mindsets, that is their own issue.

It would be, frankly, no big loss.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 07:43 AM
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reply to post by badgerprints
 



I don't get it. I bought my wife a Nook color (she loves it) when she wanted to read the 50 shades trilogy. I downloaded the Nook app to set the account up on my phone (there are great free books, or very cheap books, there). Nook is a Barnes and Noble operation. Why would they have anything against promoting ebooks?



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


It's not just e-books, it's also a venture into printed as well.

As stated above it simplifies the process from author to reader,and this is a definite threat to a standard established model that has existed for some time.

It is an older entrenched business model fighting against a newer more technologically advanced business model.

Business needs to adapt and change with the change in it's clientele or it will become an antiquated thing of the past. I think their reaction is akin to closing their eyes and covering their ears and pretending it's not happening, but also to go as far as to try to hide it from their customer base. The op was just mentioning one book, but the point of this thread and the model of business goes far beyond that and touches on many books and authors.

edit to add: I wanted to add that originally the amazon kindle was not about playing well with others, and many libraries and free books were left out. This has since changed.
edit on 8-11-2012 by Seiko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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reply to post by Seiko
 


So its not the ebook, but rather that they don't do the "straight from the author" publishing?

Yeah...that is a problem. I haven't tried to use any thing but B&N content on my ereader, since .pdf's open easily elsewhere.

If they are smart, they have learned from Blockbuster. Redbox and Netflix are killing them, and it is going to end up a game of overhead vs diversity. If Blockbuster wants to stay alive, they are going to have to offer enough other products to pay for the overhead of having a building (which they may do....they hvae a lot of crap in there), and then keep trying to make margins on movies. I doubt they will make it....the entire industry is going to have to come to Jesus with angry consumers who are asking why they should pay for it to begin with, when prices keep edging upwards (especially for movies) with less and less return in quality.

I would hope that they are just making short term moves with this ban, while they continue to build a model that can compete with Amazon, and all the other places where you can get quality content for free, or next to free. But who knows. It may be an act of hari kari.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 09:08 AM
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I use B&N more for books for my son. They just do not have the content I am looking for most of the time. At least not the actual store here in my town. It is mostly because of my reading interests don't match up to a great deal of others (mostly looking for books dealing with geology and paleontology) so I really cannot fault them for that.

I have used Amazon quite a bit for print books lately though. I can find older out of print books and easily find new books as well.

I do not have an ereader, though I am sort of eyeballing one. A lot of the stuff I want to read came as free PDFs from Google.


Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by Jomina
 


I completely agree with this! I just read a series by an author who published straight to e-book because it was more cost effective for her and easier to get her content out. This series is in the Young Adult genre and I was looking for something that my 12 year old daughter and I could read together. It was far and away better than "Twilight" and unbelievably more realistically priced. Had this author not gone right to e-book, I never would have seen her series or found a favorite new author.

If the brick and mortar stores aren't willing to keep up and take steps to accommodate the new reality in reading and book purchases, then the retailers like Amazon or Kobo or what-have-you will be the ones to flourish and prosper.

Take care,
Cindi



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by Glencairn
 


The ebook is something I am really liking. I have a number of PDFs that I would love to be able to take with me and read while on break at work (this would be very times saving for me later). I just have to find the right ereader for a nice price.

My phone does open PDFs but the screen is a bit small and I am getting older. Still though when it comes down to it I like the hard copy most of all. However, that is not always the best option even if it is an option (in some cases I cannot find a hard copy as the work is no published or is long out of print).

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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Very interesting story.

So B & N is refusing to carry his books because he's under contract with Amazon thus they'd see it as contributing to the company that will ultimately spell their demise.

Genius

Like a post above eluded to, do they not realize the ripple-effect that takes place when people stop in for a physical copy of a book? hint: they buy other stuff too.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Jomina
Let me add to my above post by saying, if a company finds itself being placed into a status of irrelevancy because they are unwilling to change their business practices to suit changing times and mindsets, that is their own issue.

It would be, frankly, no big loss.


Yep - - you have it right.

Evolve or die!



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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I remember when e-readers and e-books became popular, I found it fascinating that I can have so many books in such a neat little package.

Then I starting seeing newer ones come out that were more media related and less books, and now its practically a laptop, with a few books in it.

This isnt about e-books, authors, regular books, etc,. This is about getting more and more people less interested in reading. How many people do you walk by with one of these readers, that are actually reading a book, and not playing angry birds??

Peace, NRE.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by NoRegretsEver
 


Yeah I just seen an ad for the Kindle Fire (I think
) and they were talking about all the "great" movies you could watch on it and have netflix and games and such.

I was wondering "why can the thing just not read books?". I mean people watch movies on their phones and tablets, forget TV. How many more places do they need to watch movies? Maybe if people stopped watching so many movies they might get other stuff done.

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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This will blow up in their faces if they are not careful. E-books may be a popular thing right now, but it will never replace the real thing.

Hell, I can't stand to use one of them damned Kindles or whatever they are called. My eyes hurt after about 10 mins....so I read the book the way is was meant to be read.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by sheepslayer247
This will blow up in their faces if they are not careful. E-books may be a popular thing right now, but it will never replace the real thing.

Hell, I can't stand to use one of them damned Kindles or whatever they are called. My eyes hurt after about 10 mins....so I read the book the way is was meant to be read.


I'm with you. I don't think books will every be replaced.

I prefer hardcovers.

Just finished The Collectors.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 


I just finished the last book in William Shattner's Tek War series. I know, they are a bit dated but I love that series.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 




want to talk about dated I just got this book [The Elements Of Geology By: William Harmon Norton], it is the first printing from 1905, a hard cover and still in good condition. It was not the really nice one I was wanting but the book is still great. Aside from a few bits being outdated (this was pre-plate tectonics), the information is really good.


Some books I have to use PDF with, I just have no other choice. But if I can get a hard copy that is the way to go.

If this is any indication of the future of B&N they are going to be making enemies much like the music and movie industries.

Raist




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