Nuclear Explosion mentioned in Mahabharata War

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posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 06:04 AM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Thanks for the link to the RationalWiki, never heard of it before...




posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 08:33 AM
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Here is the problem, whilst the nearest thing we have to a device that could cause that type of destruction is a nuke it don't mean it actually was a nuclear bomb, it could (and was) a device based on a totally different technological principle but was equally destructive.




Zero Point Energy (ZPE), or vacuum fluctuation energy are terms used to describe the random electromagnetic oscillations that are left in a vacuum after all other energy has been removed. If you remove all the energy from a space, take out all the matter, all the heat, all the light... everything -- you will find that there is still some energy left





In simplistic terms it has been said that there is enough energy in the volume the size of a coffee cup to boil away Earth’s oceans. - that’s one strong cup of coffee! For a while a lot of physics thought that concept was too hard to swallow. This vacuum energy is more widely accepted today.


www.nasa.gov...
edit on 9-11-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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Given the fact that i am Indian, i have no idea what those images say!...



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by LUXUS
 


again - before anything else - we need a cite for the primary source that confirms these claims ,

no reliable englisg translation , such as : this one

contains the text quoted - why is that ????????

you are chasing a hoax



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by luciddream
I won't say nuclear but some kinda of huge explosion did happen, due to the increased damage in the center and lessen as it stretches out, also as well as the skeletons dieing together. Like something happened instantly.

Please provide evidence of the damage you describe.

Also, there is no real evidence that any people died at the same time.

As Hans said, the entire story is total bunk.

Harte



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 07:54 PM
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Is it not possible that that village just suffered from a Tunguska-like event? I.e, a comet exploded in the lower atmosphere, causing massive destruction but not leaving any trace?



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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The truth is, there's no evidence at Mohenjo-Daro for any large explosive event at all.

Like Hans said, it's a line of bull. Only he was a bit nicer about it, likely due to his not having been dealing with this internet fable for a decade like I have been.

Harte



posted on Nov, 9 2012 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by Harte
The truth is, there's no evidence at Mohenjo-Daro for any large explosive event at all.

Like Hans said, it's a line of bull. Only he was a bit nicer about it, likely due to his not having been dealing with this internet fable for a decade like I have been.

Harte


Hey Harte



I've been dealing with it since I got my first Apple II GS equiped with a PC transporter in 1986 with good old America on Line and usenet !

I'm nicer because I've mellowed with age and semi-retirement while you're still leading the forlorn hope in the trench warfare known as public education
edit on 9/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by SajeevJino
 


Nuclear explosions leave traces in form of rare isotopes of various elements

Example is Beryllium -10 produced by fast neutron spallation of C13 (heavier isotope of carbon, forms 1.1%
of carbon )


It is also formed in nuclear explosions by a reaction of fast neutrons with 13C in the carbon dioxide in air, and is one of the historical indicators of past activity at nuclear test sites.


Beryllium 10 has half life of 1.39 million years

Examing other debris left by nuclear explosions can determine whether uranium or plutonium was the fissile
element and in case of plutonium even help trace the reactor which produced it


To investigate what information might be available, physicist Albert Fahey at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and colleagues examined the elements, and the ratios of various isotopes, in debris from the first ever nuclear test, carried out on 16 July 1945 at the Trinity site in the New Mexico desert.



One basic fact his team hoped to show could be gleaned from the trinitite was whether the weapon was powered by plutonium or uranium. As some countries produce bombs made of one or the other but not both, this could help narrow the list of possible sources. The Trinity bomb was made of plutonium, and Fahey’s team found this element in quantities of up to 400 parts per billion in the trinitite.


Unless one can find such traces at the site of presumed nuclear explosion have to conclude it is hoax......



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by babybunnies
 


Not when you actually research the topic. It has happened exactly in the way I have described, accidentally a few times before; sans my alchemist theory as to how this one could have occurred; perhaps it did in this case; hence my posting.



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 06:19 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by Harte
The truth is, there's no evidence at Mohenjo-Daro for any large explosive event at all.

Like Hans said, it's a line of bull. Only he was a bit nicer about it, likely due to his not having been dealing with this internet fable for a decade like I have been.

Harte


Hey Harte



I've been dealing with it since I got my first Apple II GS equiped with a PC transporter in 1986 with good old America on Line and usenet !

I'm nicer because I've mellowed with age and semi-retirement while you're still leading the forlorn hope in the trench warfare known as public education


Age? I'm 56 and I used to be a lot nicer when discussing this claptrap.

It didn't work, obviously.

You've been chasing this Rense.com fable (supposedly originally from the "World Island Revue" magazine which doesn't exist) since 1986? The story with a "Francis Taylor, Archaeologist" (also nonexistant) and the interview-like quotes from a translator of the Mahabharata describing how nuclear explosions look who died decades before the first A bomb was detonated?

You are a better man than I am, Hans, if you can retell the facts of the story for that long without getting a little snarky.

Harte

edit on 11/10/2012 by Harte because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


The Vitrified Forts of Scotland, and around the world where stone was literally melted and fused together by intense heat.


logos..._endless_summer.tripod.com/id139.html
edit on 10-11-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by Harte



Hey Harte






Age? I'm 56 and I used to be a lot nicer when discussing this claptrap.


Well I have two years on you

You've been chasing this Rense.com fable (supposedly originally from the "World Island Revue" magazine which doesn't exist) since 1986? The story with a "Francis Taylor, Archaeologist" (also nonexistant) and the interview-like quotes from a translator of the Mahabharata describing how nuclear explosions look who died decades before the first A bomb was detonated?

I was chasing an earlier version, In 1960 Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier published 'Morning of the Magicians', their outrageous depiction of atomic bombs


You are a better man than I am, Hans, if you can retell the facts of the story for that long without getting a little snarky.


I had many years experience of developing patience trying to teach Arab students basic computer, business, software and logistics skills

Colavita's report
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Virtified forts

Link one

Link 2




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