Coyote attacked my cat right in my yard in camden county NJ......

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posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by MyHappyDogShiner
This may be difficult for you to believe,but your cat is the critter that doesn't belong there.

If you want to keep pets,and you don't want to watch them die,keep them inside the house.


Having cats outside is a base requirement for most farms and other places out in the countryside. Cats are utility animals for most farms.

They are the only thing stopping you and your buildings from being inundated with mice and rats. Trying to run a grain farm without cats to patrol the buildings and property would be an untenable situation for most.

The coyotes have shown no tendency to control the rat and mice population after they kill off the cats. They spend more time going after bigger game like deer.

The cats stay where they are. The coyotes are the one that will have to learn a lesson the hard way.




posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 


I can agree with this. The only coyotes that really eat mice and voles are lone animals or an animal from a very small packs that are mostly out to feed themself and not the others.

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Raist
 


Our coyote have so much raccoon, possum, beaver, muskrat, young deer, turkey/goose that I can believe they wouldn't spend any time trying to catch a mouse, unless one crawls into its den. Mice are very gifted at being elusive.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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I live in Fairfield county in Connectict...between Coyote's and foxes I had to put up fence in my back yard!


articles.courant.com...



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by violet
I guess someone who loves coyotes as much as we love our kids and pets won out on getting them released back into the wild.

Keyword: back.
Your cat needs training.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by jeantherapy
 


Yeah that is the way it is here. So much wildlife that I think they ignore mice unless the mice go directly to them. Well there is that and the fact that they roam in large packs around here that going after one mouse would be a waste of energy unless they were starving (which is not going to happen here).

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 10:26 AM
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This might help the OP. I say might as it is worth a try. The bolding is mine.


1. Never feed coyotes intentionally or unintentionally. Be aware of possible sources of food in your yard.

2. Do not leave uneaten pet food outside.

3. Do not discard edible garbage where coyotes can get into it.

4. Secure garbage containers and eliminate their odors. Use a small amount of ammonia or cayenne pepper in the garbage

to discourage scavenging.

5. Restrict use of birdseed. Coyotes are attracted to seed, and to the birds and rodents that use the feeder.

6. Wherever possible, eliminate outdoor sources of water. Be aware that coyotes will prey on coy fish if the fish do not have

proper cover or a deep enough pond.

7. Trim and clear ground level shrubs that can provide cover for coyotes.

8. Use fencing to help deter coyotes. The fence must be at least six feet tall with the bottom extending at least six inches

below ground level.

9. Actively discourage coyotes by making loud noises. Motion detector lights and alarm systems can also help from keeping

coyotes out of your yard.

10. Pick fruit as soon as it ripens and keep rotted fruit off the ground.

11. Scattered mothballs and ammonia-soaked rags strategically placed may deter coyotes from entering your yard.

12. Keep cats and small dogs indoors, allowing them outside only under strict supervision.

13. Keep chickens, rabbits and other small animals in well-protected areas and in sturdy cages at night. Cages made of

chicken wire are meant only for keeping small animals contained, not to keep coyotes out!


14. Coyotes are attracted to, and can mate with unspayed or unneutered domestic dogs. Unspayed female dogs in season

will attract male coyotes, and unneutered male dogs can be lured away by the scent of a female coyote. There have been

cases of male dogs being lured by the female coyote's scent and then killed by male coyotes.


15. If you do not mind sharing your space with coyotes, enjoy observing them with binoculars when they visit.




List obtined from this link.

www.ladybug.uconn.edu...

If not I suggest you get a rifle and start killing them. If they are attacking your animals on your property they are a pest and a danger. Your job is to ward off or kill any danger to your family, home, land, or pets/livestock.

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by Raist
 


Excellent info Raist, TY. Trash is already contained due to raccoon problems. We have huge deer population here so I'm thinking so long as the deer are here, the coyotes will remain. I think I mentioned earlier, I haven't seen our flock of wild turkeys in a while. Hope they are o.k....



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


No problem.

I think what might help best is to set up the motion lights/alarms and mostly the mothballs and ammonia rags.

I understand this happened in the day, but if you can keep them away at night it will help to keep them away in the day. If killing them with a rifle or shotgun is a no go for what ever reason you could also try using a pellet gun. After getting hit a few times with that they might stay away. Or you could also try a small shotgun, say a 410 with w light bird shot.

Either way you do not want them near your house. There is always a chance you or a loved one could get attacked even if they are normally shy animals.

Raist



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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I am a life long resident of Western PA. 47 years to be exact. Until this year, I have NEVER seen a live coyote, in "person"

We own a sizable amount of wooded property, and last month I saw my dog being chased by what I thought was a "Husky"

Next day, "Husky" was standing in my yard, about 200 yards from my back porch.

I took aim with my .223, verified it was in fact a coyote through the scope (bushy tail, nearly dragging on the ground) and fired.

Dead.

PETA -- Suck an egg.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by phantomjack
 


Me too! Life long resident or 44 years and the same, never seen a coyote in person, in my life. It was shocking. I guess the first time you see one, is always a shocker....



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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Calm down people, Coyotes are not some horrible mythical creature, I see them from time to time. Stop acting like it's a wolf "shocking, just shocking", coyotes are small little things, smaller than most dogs. They are not aggressive towards humans.

Good grief.
edit on 11/8/2012 by Drezden because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by violet
I guess someone who loves coyotes as much as we love our kids and pets won out on getting them released back into the wild.

Hope your cat's ok.


Comparing kids to pets is silly.

What if coyotes had been the main domesticated canine? What if we all had pet coyotes and there were wild dogs native to the U.S. instead? Dogs that are much bigger than coyotes and could easily attack and hurt humans (in ways coyotes cannot because they are so small)?

Then you would be talking bad about those horrible dogs who attack our poor small coyotes?

Do you see the absurdity? You can't deem one species to be better or more worthy of sharing our world and land over another... Especially when coyotes are native to the U.S. and domesticated dogs and cats are not.
edit on 11/8/2012 by Drezden because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


Ironically, there was a local news story here this morning about that very thing... seems the coyotes are taking over..

www.ksn.com...



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by Drezden
coyotes are small little things, smaller than most dogs.


Sure…..
Come on over, I am sure there is a few cute LITTLE yots up in the hills that you can pet and hug.

Just make sure to notify your next of kin so they can come by in a few days and pick up your bones.


There has to be something said for terminal stupidity.
edit on 8-11-2012 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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I guess I must lead a sheltered life because I've always had coyotes around, along with deer, bears (black bear, not brown), all the little critters you can think of, and once in awhile a cougar. I see and hear coyotes especially in winter when there is snow on the ground and they tend to roam the neighborhoods. They'll break into garbage cans and if they sense food, dig under fences.

That's one reason my cats are inside cats. Coyotes are not the only enemy of cats. Bald eagles can swoop down and carry off a cat quite easily. Before we had the epiphany to keep cats indoors my wife and I had four lilac point siamese (nearly white cats) We were all outside in the back yard, a wooded area, "sunbathing" when I saw two pair of bald eagles circling. I pointed out the sight to my wife and then realized----THE CATS! My wife jumped up and ran to the end of the deck yelling, "Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!" as loud as she could.

"Carol," I said. "You're naked!" She ran back to a more private area just as all four kitties came racing out of the woods to the back door and tumbled all over themselves to get inside. They knew from the terror in my wife's voice that something was dreadfully wrong and they were in trouble.

Awhile after my big male was killed by a car. We began to realize that the hazards outside for cats are just too much. We waited awhile after the last siamese died, then when we got two new cats it is actually in the contract that they will be inside cats.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by gnosticagnostic
reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


Ironically, there was a local news story here this morning about that very thing... seems the coyotes are taking over..

www.ksn.com...

Interesting. Thanks for that gnostic...
To the other poster above, little, is not exactly how I would describe this coyote. When I say I am surrounded by approx. 32 acres. That's it. There are no woods near. We are about 15 minutes from Atco, where the latest bear sightings are, and about 45 minutes from the pine barrens, where, well, every type of animal lives. So the shocker was, knowing the coyote made it this far....
edit on 11/8/12 by j.r.c.b. because: Clarification



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by schuyler
 


Dude you get a star just for the story. That story is just begging for me to say something else there are so many innuendos one could make from all of it. I can imagine Quagmire from Family Guy going "giggity giggity". No disrespect to you or your wife of course, it is just the Quagmire inside of me



Raist
edit on 11/8/12 by Raist because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


I've had to end a number of coyotes in my life, usually to protect the household pets.

They're extremely smart, especially when in packs, though lone coyotes usually scavenge for carrion or pick on smaller animals. If there are coyotes in your area, it is a good sign that diversity is coming back to the flora and fauna of your area.

I would embrace it and keep an eye on your cat.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Sorry to hear about your cat: I hope it's ok. Coyotes are native to your area and have worked their way back East over the last 100 years. Extremely adaptable and often rarely seen their numbers have risen dramatically.

A little over 20 years ago there were no coyotes in my part of Virginia, now they're ubiquitous. My last hunting trip I took with my dad I spotted one while on a stand. Later that night I somehow missed one tiny piece of jerky in my pack which I set next to my tent entrance. Woke up in the morning and my pack was gone. That coyote had dragged it over the hill and chewed a hole right through the fabric just to get that tiny piece of jerky. Don't underestimate them, they're very smart, cunning and not afraid of humans for the most part.
edit on 8-11-2012 by Asktheanimals because: corrections



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