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Coyote attacked my cat right in my yard in camden county NJ......

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posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:44 PM
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TY ALL. You gave me More info then the nj wildlife guy, who just wants to keep track of their sightings! What did he expect me to go out and tag it for him too?? Lollol....




posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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My buddies cat had got its a$$ kicked by the local wildlife for most its life but now hes a total bada$$. watched him take care of a neighbours dog, a coyote would have a hard time with this one.

Your cat will probably know what to do next time it gets threatened but get a bb gun just incase.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by strafgod
 


No worries. I'm ready if he returns....



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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Originally posted by olliemc84
As a matter of fact, most coyotes den during the day and only hunt at night, usually for field mice, rabbits, voles, and if they are left outside to roam free, pets.


Utter BS. That is if there is nothing else for them to hunt. They will go after anything they think they can get a bite out of.
They go after deer.
They go after sheep.
They go after cows.
They go after large dogs.

If they don’t know what it is, and it doesn’t attack them first, then they will “take a look” to determine if they can eat it or not. Once they get a taste of the first one, then subsequent attacks will be more sustained and ruthless.

I have even had a pack of them launch an attack on our dogs when I was standing a couple feet behind the dogs. God I wish I had a gun with me then. I would of opened up holy hell on them!
edit on 7-11-2012 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by olliemc84
 

I know this from a friend that was a Florida Conservation Officer.
Here, especially in major cattle ranching areas or Florida, they are considered an invasive pest, that is a hazard to ranchers livestock. They can eat up to their own weight/day in meat.

As a matter of fact, if you ever see a rancher with a field full of cattle, and one donkey standing out there with them, this is why:

ABSTRACT
Though livestock guarding dogs have
received considerable attention in recent years,
other animals including donkeys (Equus asinus)
are being used to protect sheep and goats from
predation by coyotes (Canis latrans). In Texas
many ranchers prefer donkeys due to low cost,
relatively small maintenance requirements, and
compatibility with other predator control
methods. This paper describes husbandry
practices for use of guard donkeys and relates
rancher accounts of their effectiveness in
protecting sheep and goats.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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Originally posted by olliemc84
Your quote you offered from nj.com is BS. Coyotes have ALWAYS been in this area. They DIDN'T migrate from the west. As a matter of fact, the eastern coyote is a completely different species from the coyotes from the west and is scientifically proven to have interbred with wolves in the distant past.

NJDEP

Did you read your own link:

The coyote is a wild member of the dog family. This resourceful mammal has expanded its range significantly in the recent past, colonizing the entire Northeast and now found throughout the Garden State. The coyote was never introduced or stocked in New Jersey, but has firmly established itself in our area through its extremely adaptable nature.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 







guard donkeys


My eyes kept drifting back to that phrase.
In all my life I have never heard of anything as awesomely cool as 'guard donkeys'!



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 


I see them pretty frequently down here with the cattle ranchers. I never knew what it was for until I got talking to a customer one evening. He owned a ranch where he raised and sold donkeys for this purpose. Donkeys are mean animals, and will put up one hell of a fight if a predator comes around.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:08 AM
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It's not just the rural areas:




A woman in south Buckhead says she was traumatized when she witnesses a pack of coyotes attacking her cat. The three coyotes were captured on a neighbor's surveillance camera.

Wildlife experts say coyotes have moved in to Georgia at a record pace. Even in the city of Atlanta, there are at least 3,000 coyote sightings a year.


www.myfoxatlanta.com...

The raccoons and possums are taking over as well. Last year a deer chased a couple down a major highway. I think the animals are getting pissed at us and are planning a coup.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:14 AM
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Originally posted by olliemc84
reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 




Coyote Precautions
.........
If coyotes are present, make sure they know they're not welcome. Make loud noises, blast a canned air siren, throw rocks, or spray them with a garden hose.


NJDEP


Again, that is the worst possible advice. They quickly learn that all you will do is make a lot of noise, and you are no threat to them.

............edit............
Keep in mind that the things they eat also make a lot of noise…. When they are eating them.

Noise with no pain is no deterrent. The only thing they understand is pain.
edit on 8-11-2012 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:29 AM
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I'm in Passaic County, I see a pair of yotes several times a week late at night. I named them "Hat" and "Shawl". They're pretty bold, if they get too bold they'll end up under the Christmas tree...



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:34 AM
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Originally posted by EyesWideShut
I'm in Passaic County, I see a pair of yotes several times a week late at night. I named them "Hat" and "Shawl". They're pretty bold, if they get too bold they'll end up under the Christmas tree...




Under the Chistmas tree? WTH?



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:37 AM
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In Florida, you can kill them “at will” on your property, or any private property with the owners permission:

myfwc.com...
There is no closed season on coyotes in Florida. Legal methods of take are by gun, bow or snare. Steel traps and can be used only by special permit issued by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, and use of poisons to kill coyotes is illegal.  A permit is not required to take coyote with a gun and light at night on private property with landowner permission.

Another human attack here in FL:
www.floridatoday.com...



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:40 AM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 

I assume he means like this:




posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Yup




What do the donkey, llama and coyote have in common? Oddly, farmers are using more unusual creatures to protect their flocks of sheep from Coyote attack.


That llama is badass lol
edit on 8-11-2012 by Trustfund because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:55 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5

Originally posted by olliemc84
Your quote you offered from nj.com is BS. Coyotes have ALWAYS been in this area. They DIDN'T migrate from the west. As a matter of fact, the eastern coyote is a completely different species from the coyotes from the west and is scientifically proven to have interbred with wolves in the distant past.

NJDEP

Did you read your own link:

The coyote is a wild member of the dog family. This resourceful mammal has expanded its range significantly in the recent past, colonizing the entire Northeast and now found throughout the Garden State. The coyote was never introduced or stocked in New Jersey, but has firmly established itself in our area through its extremely adaptable nature.


Yes. The eastern coyote has expanded its range. They didn't migrate from the west.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Tranny

Originally posted by olliemc84
reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 




Coyote Precautions
.........
If coyotes are present, make sure they know they're not welcome. Make loud noises, blast a canned air siren, throw rocks, or spray them with a garden hose.


NJDEP


Again, that is the worst possible advice. They quickly learn that all you will do is make a lot of noise, and you are no threat to them.

............edit............
Keep in mind that the things they eat also make a lot of noise…. When they are eating them.

Noise with no pain is no deterrent. The only thing they understand is pain.
edit on 8-11-2012 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)


I am aware of that when my foxpro is blaring as loud as it can between midnight and 4am with my 22-250 in my lap.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:04 AM
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Where i live in the calif desert outside the navy base at China Lake dogs and cat disappear all the time and many times coming back from work i would see a Yote cross the high way with a small dog or cat in its mouth.

Two or three days later i would see the flyers at the local stores posted by people looking for there missing dog or cat that looked just like the one the Yote was carrying away..

i had some friends that had a number of guard dogs at there mine attacked by a Yote pack. the only dogs that they got that could survive Yote attacks was three pit bulls.

we finely caught the pack moving up on the mine one day in a gully and we were at one of the mine dumps high on the hill over looking the Yotes.

tTree scope mounted black guns with a number of 30 round mags made quick work of wiping out that Yote pack



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:08 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5

Originally posted by olliemc84
Your quote you offered from nj.com is BS. Coyotes have ALWAYS been in this area. They DIDN'T migrate from the west. As a matter of fact, the eastern coyote is a completely different species from the coyotes from the west and is scientifically proven to have interbred with wolves in the distant past.

NJDEP

Did you read your own link:

The coyote is a wild member of the dog family. This resourceful mammal has expanded its range significantly in the recent past, colonizing the entire Northeast and now found throughout the Garden State. The coyote was never introduced or stocked in New Jersey, but has firmly established itself in our area through its extremely adaptable nature.




How Did Coyotes Arrive in New York?
There are two theories to explain the presence of Eastern coyotes in New York. The first theory is that coyotes were here before Europeans settled North America. The clearing of the forest for farms and homes forced coyotes to retreat to unsettled areas of the northeast, e.g., the Adirondack mountains. The return of the forest during this century coincided with the return of the coyote.

The second, and more widely accepted theory, is that the Eastern coyote is a relatively new species in New York. This theory suggests that western coyotes extended their range eastward, eventually forming a distinct subspecies.

Whichever theory is true, coyotes have been present in New York at least since the 1930's, and firmly established themselves by the 1970's. They are here to stay.


NYS DEC

The theory is still up in the air. But considering the fact that the eastern coyote is a hybrid gray wolf/coyote imo they have been here for quite some time.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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Originally posted by cavalryscout

Originally posted by EyesWideShut
I'm in Passaic County, I see a pair of yotes several times a week late at night. I named them "Hat" and "Shawl". They're pretty bold, if they get too bold they'll end up under the Christmas tree...




Under the Chistmas tree? WTH?



Originally posted by EyesWideShut
I'm in Passaic County, I see a pair of yotes several times a week late at night. I named them "Hat" and "Shawl" .They're pretty bold, if they get too bold they'll end up under the Christmas tree...



HAT



SHAWL








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