Coyote attacked my cat right in my yard in camden county NJ......

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posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


That is a badass cat if it got away!

We have them all over down here in Phoenix.(of course.)

About two years ago my car broke down south of the airport it was about 3:00am so I decided to wait for the city bus rather than bother friends / family or waste money on a taxi. I was sitting there when out of the corner of my eye I notice movement. When I looked it was a pack of three or four of them walking toward me. At first I thought they were dogs, which wouldn't have been any better, but they were coyotes. They must have been a quarter mile away but that was close enough for me to get up and start walking.

They say they won't bother you but I'd like to see those people sit there as they approach. I walked for about a mile until I reached a major intersection. Of course not a single car passed I don't know how long they followed me but I glanced back twice and they were closer the third time I looked they were gone.

I couldn't believe they were downtown Phoenix. They are all around the foothills and out laying areas but just not what I expected to deal with that night.




posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:44 PM
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Kill it. Coyotes are a nuisance and will kill your pets and small livestock. You have to just not say anything to anyone about it afterwards.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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So when are they going to open a hunting season for coyotes? I bet if SHTF I know I'll eat coyote, lol.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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i actually had to patch my other cat up recently at the vet..in think just another cat or racoon this time..so hard to keep him inside..not happy so i have to let him be a cat..i have used a paintball gun to scare wildlife away..totally non lethal but you have to see them of course..i think the wolf urine might do the trick and thats pretty painless for all involved..well maybee the guy who follows the wolf around with a bottle has it tough..lol



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


My cat "Defcon" alert meter is falling as I think you'll maybe get this together and the cat will be OK

Don't forget to order the Wolf urine though
That was so cool to read because I had no idea


My room mate just told me you can put cat fur down Mole holes and they'll leave town... Makes sense to me



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by Trustfund
 

That first video was hilarious!! Wow!! Shoula seen me, flying into the woods with one of my sons karate sticks. If any of my neighbors seen me, they woulda thought I was nuts!! Lollol...the cat usually never leaves our property, so no major roads in the vicinity. One less worry....



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by ldyserenity
So when are they going to open a hunting season for coyotes? I bet if SHTF I know I'll eat coyote, lol.


Hell yeah.

I'd eat cats too.......make a coyote and cat stew.
edit on 7-11-2012 by cavalryscout because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Turns out a friend of my hubs, shot one a few weeks ago, not too far from here....he had a chicken coop and the coyotes were getting his chickens...



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 


Lol...he is a tough cat. Anytime we gotta take into the vet, even for the simplest thing, they sedate him right away...lol... He was smart enough to jump on the side òf the ledge the coyote couldn't finish him off!!



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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Originally posted by cavalryscout

Originally posted by ldyserenity
So when are they going to open a hunting season for coyotes? I bet if SHTF I know I'll eat coyote, lol.


Hell yeah.

I'd eat cats too.......make a stew coyote and cat stew.


FYI...I just poured wolf urine all around your reply
edit on 7-11-2012 by minkmouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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Lead will keep them from bothering you again. Lead at 2000FPS.

As i have stated before in regard to coyotes....
My best advice would be to shoot them when you see them. You may regret it if you don’t.

I have a strict shoot on sight policy with them.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 

Don't wanna say much about it, but my gear is ready, if he comes calling....



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 


Your cat is going to hate this, but its better then being eaten by a coyote I suppose...
Cat allergies come from cat dander, which is like human dandruff. Its even worse with cats, as they lick themselves to clean, which adds additional allergens from the saliva to the skin that flakes off:

cats.about.com...
Fel D1 may come from the Latin Felis Domestica. It is a glycoprotein found in the cat's sebaceous glands under the skin, to a lesser degree in cats' saliva, and in cats' urine. When a cat grooms his coat, the Fel D1 present in his saliva lands on the cats' skin and hairs, and combined with the Fel D1 from the sebaceous glands, creates a sort of "double whammy" to allergy sufferers.

Your best bet with being able to keep the cat indoors, is to constantly wash the cat, keep its litter box clean, change your air filters regularly, and vacuum (including furniture) daily. You might also want to get a good air purifier for areas where your son frequents, and restrict the cat from those areas. Allergy shots will help him, but its not a quick fix (at least it wasn't for me), and it takes many years to build up a tolerance for certain things. To this day, I still have problems with cats when I get into close proximity with one that has not been recently washed. I went through the entire course of allergy shots, starting with one shot in each arm, twice a week, for about ten years.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Dirty beasts those cats.

I take it back I don't think I'd eat a cat afterall.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Defcon, I am just as bad as you. Years and years of allergy shots while growing up....still can send me into a full blown asthma attack after all these years. My daughter wasn't thinking when she brought it home as a kitten!!



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
If your state law allows keep some firecrackers on hand to scare it next time. It should keep it away. If not use something loud.
A motion sensor light can help. Keep any trash cans up so not to attract them. Other than that Wolf urine to deter them. I don't know if human urine will work but it might work for territorial marking.


You don’t want to use firecrackers to try and scare them away. I repeat!!!
You don’t want to use firecrackers to try and scare them away!!!!
I learned that mistake the hard way. They will quickly learn that the sound is not dangerous and it will make them even more brazen. Or worse, they will lose fear of you. If that happens, then it may be you, or your child that they will start stalking as food. I quickly learned that lesson when several stalked me as I was walking back to the house at night.

And your repeated interaction with them will also allow them to learn your sleeping habits, or when you are away. They will quickly learn when they can have free roam of your property, and they will make full use of it, while you sleep.

Urine will deter them, but not stop them. If they are hungry, they will often test the bounds of their territory. If they find that there is nothing enforcing those marked boundaries (which they will sooner or later), then you are back to square one.
edit on 7-11-2012 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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Coyotes... meh. I'm much more worried about the Griz and cougar that have shown up in my backyard this fall. We have lost three cats in the last two years.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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Coyotes are encroaching all over the place, I'm pretty sure that it has to do with climate change and depletion of their natural environments more then someone releasing a few locally. They are considered a hazardous invasive species, and must consume tremendous amounts of meat per day. Because of the hazard that they present to cattle, and the amount of power that the cattle lobby has, in many places you are free to kill them without a license or permit (check your local laws though).
reply to post by defcon5
 


While you are correct about them encroaching all over the place, you are wrong about the reasons. The reasons why there are so many coyotes now is that nobody is hunting them and that they have no known natural predators in this area. No cougars. No gray wolves. That only leaves humans as their primary predators in the northeast. And hunting numbers are down and not all hunters want to put in the time to hunt them. It is a lot of work. They are NOT a "hazardous invasive species" and it isn't necessary for them to eat tremendous amounts of meat a day. As a matter of fact, most coyotes den during the day and only hunt at night, usually for field mice, rabbits, voles, and if they are left outside to roam free, pets. But in an urban/suburban setting a lot of their primary food isn't around and they will pounce on whatever they need to to survive. Most of their diets is road kill or other carrion.

Your quote you offered from nj.com is BS. Coyotes have ALWAYS been in this area. They DIDN'T migrate from the west. As a matter of fact, the eastern coyote is a completely different species from the coyotes from the west and is scientifically proven to have interbred with wolves in the distant past.

NJDEP



Eastern coyotes differ from their western counterparts with a larger average size and various color phases, including blonde, red and black. Past interbreeding between gray wolves and coyotes may be responsible for the larger size and color variations in our eastern coyote. In New Jersey, adult coyotes range in weight from 20-50 lbs. and exceptionally large ones may be up to 55 lbs.


Again, not invasive.



Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem, helping to keep rodent populations under control. They are by nature wary of humans. However, coyote behavior changes if given access to human food and garbage. They lose caution and fear. They may cause property damage and threaten human safety, requiring euthanasia. Relocating a problem coyote is not an option because it only moves the problem to someone else's neighborhood.


Please try not to demonize the coyote. It isn't there fault that humans have taken over their natural habitat. They were here well before we were.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by j.r.c.b.
 




Coyote Precautions

The following guidelines can help reduce the likelihood of conflicts with coyotes:


Never feed a coyote. Deliberately feeding coyotes puts pets and other residents in the neighborhood at risk.
Feeding pet cats and/or feral (wild) cats outdoors can attract coyotes. The coyotes feed on the pet food and also prey upon the cats.
Put garbage in tightly closed containers that cannot be tipped over.
Remove sources of water, especially in dry climates.
Bring pets in at night.
Put away bird feeders at night to avoid attracting rodents and other coyote prey.
Provide secure enclosures for rabbits, poultry, and other farm animals.
Pick up fallen fruit and cover compost piles.
Although extremely rare, coyotes have been known to attack humans. Parents should monitor their children, even in familiar surroundings, such as backyards.
Install motion-sensitive lighting around the house.
Clear brush and dense weeds from around dwellings - this reduces protective cover for coyotes and makes the area less attractive to rodents and rabbits. Coyotes, as well as other predators, are attracted to areas where rodents are concentrated like woodpiles.
If coyotes are present, make sure they know they're not welcome. Make loud noises, blast a canned air siren, throw rocks, or spray them with a garden hose.


NJDEP

Do all that, or I can come down with my .22 mag and take care of them for you. Pelts are almost $25 a pop.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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Its funny that this came up tonight.
Just a few nights ago I saw two in our parking lot at work. We have people who have been feeding the stray cats that frequent our parking lot for years. Despite everyones best attempts at telling these folks to please stop leaving food out there, they continue to do so. They have been attracting all sorts of other wildlife besides the feral cats, including HUGE raccoons (which have lost their fear of humans, and have a high probability of carrying rabies), and rats. Now the coyotes have shown up to clean up the problem... If we're lucky here, maybe they'll eat, or at least scare off, the “cat feeding" people.


Anyway, I just found this site, maybe it will help you some:
www.pestcontrolrx.com...
edit on 11/7/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)





 
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