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Pentagon sidesteps Law protecting our Troops

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posted on May, 1 2003 @ 12:35 PM
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Public Law 105-85 requires the Pentagon to collect health data on troops before and after deployment to a war zone. But troops headed to Iraq were not examined as the law specifically requires -- through physical exams and blood tests -- as The Kansas City Star first reported in March.
Pentagon officials admit they havenít followed the law. They say a short questionnaire suffices in place of a medical exam. They say thereís no sense testing a generally healthy population of soldiers. They say there wasnít time for exams in the rush to war, and troops returning home wonít sit still long enough for an exam.
These excuses havenít impressed Rep. Chris Shays (R-Conn.). He convened a hearing on March 25.
"From my standpoint, youíre not meeting the letter of the law, clearly, and I donít think youíre meeting the spirit of the law," Shays told a Pentagon representative who testified.
Doctors who advised the military on protecting soldiersí health also registered concern at the hearing. The law is an "important mandate," said Dr. Manning Feinleib, but "implementation has been fragmented." Dr. John Moxley, III, said Pentagon practices did not incorporate recommendations made by his and other advisory panels.
Those suggestions shaped the law, passed in 1997 after the sad experience of Gulf War veterans. Tens of thousands of them waited years before getting the government-provided health care they earned as soldiers. Why? A lack of basic health data delayed a Pentagon decision that their maladies -- now known collectively as "Gulf War Syndrome" -- were related to their service.
"Laws designed to protect soldiers on the battlefield are being ignored," testified Steven Robinson, a former Army Ranger who now runs the National Gulf War Resource Center. "Service members are being set up to face another round of delay, denial and obfuscation regarding possible service-connected medical conditions or disabilities."
Several members of Congress have asked the General Accounting Office to investigate. While we await its report, due this summer, perhaps Mr. Rumsfeld would tell us: Can the Pentagon ignore ANY law it thinks is mistaken?

www.tompaine.com...




posted on May, 1 2003 @ 01:09 PM
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"Those suggestions shaped the law, passed in 1997 after the sad experience of Gulf War veterans. Tens of thousands of them waited years before getting the government-provided health care they earned as soldiers. Why? A lack of basic health data delayed a Pentagon decision that their maladies -- now known collectively as "Gulf War Syndrome" -- were related to their service"

Most likely the same reason why they're doing it again.

The humiliations the troops with Gulf war syndrome had to go through on both sides of the Atlantic for recognition for their illness was disgraceful. They were treated like money grabbing liars. (Though, if I remember correctly the Americans recognized the disease before the British did, the British government treated the sufferers like scum.)

Once they can no longer use you are only a drain on their resources. The less court cases and compensation the Government has to deal with, the better.
With this example any troops with a complaint will have a much weaker case as they do not have a comprehensive medical check to correlate their case against. The Government's learned its lesson from the last time. Only, as always, itís the wrong lesson.
That's what it looks like to me.



posted on May, 1 2003 @ 01:18 PM
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frwebgate.access.gpo.gov...:publ85.105

Definitely an extremely biased website that is too busy grinding an axe to be concerned with truth. The above link is to the Public Law 105-85, for anyone who wants to read it.



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