Poll Intimidation has BEGUN!

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posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


I think its safe to say that someone may be intimidated merely by someones appearance and or behavior. Threatening language is simply another factor in the process of intimidation.

Also, groups of people such as the elderly or disabled may find themselves at a disadvantage and subsequently be easier to intimidate.

Another fear I have heard expressed was the fact that if one or the other side loses there may be retaliation by either group after the fact. This is simply a side note that may factor into the intimidation.

While the behavior may be "legal" or not likely to be prosecuted or furthermore charges that are filed dropped at a later time regardless of the strength of the case, I feel that is is a shameful display of so called Americans and even more shameful that the behavior is tolerated and defended.
edit on 6-11-2012 by anoobgirl because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by SpaDe_
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


So you would be ok with a couple of KKK members posting up outside a polling place?


Sure, it's their right. So long as there is no threatening language being spewed about. Again, a presence is not intimidation. Threats are.

Threats are also a crime and should be reported to the police and to the poll workers so that appropriate action can be taken.


I disagree. Standing in front of a polling place wearing combat boots, paramilitary uniforms, and carrying clubs IS intimidating and that is the intent of the black panther's actions.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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Unless the Black Panthers or any other group goes into the voting booth with you, how can they disrupt the vote? I've never understood this. You walk past them, close the curtain and vote. It's not like a sign goes on above the booth saying, "this person voted for X, beat him up."

Sounds like folks know Romney doesn't stand a chance and are front loading the excuses for why he didn't.

Now, that said, if any group, including the media, asked who I voted for, I would smile and walk away.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 

If that is your polling place, then you need to vote, if they stop you, make noise, call the media and demand justice. If they are indeed out there, get video, make noise, especially if they have weapons, cause then that is intimidation. But video is a good way to bring light to this. Standing across the street and taking pictures, if not video can do alot of good.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by anoobgirl
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


I think its safe to say that someone may be intimidated merely by someones appearance and or behavior. Threatening language is simply another factor in the process of intimidation.


I do not discount the fact that some people are intimidated by the way someone else looks/dresses, but the person feeling the intimidation needs to ask themselves why they are intimidated in the first place. Having a false sense of intimidation is a personal issue, not a civil/criminal issue.


While the behavior may be "legal" or not likely to be prosecuted or furthermore charges that are filed dropped at a later time regardless of the strength of the case, I feel that is is a shameful display of so called Americans and even more shameful that the behavior is tolerated and defended.


What behavior? Being present at a polling location? It may be shameful to you, but it is their constitutional right and I will defend that right for anyone; even if I can't tolerate it. So long as it is legal to show a presence at a polling station, then everyone has a right to be present. The rule of law must apply to all or apply to none.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


As the DOJ has already displayed the "rule of law" does NOT apply to everyone.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by NavyDoc

Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by SpaDe_
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


So you would be ok with a couple of KKK members posting up outside a polling place?


Sure, it's their right. So long as there is no threatening language being spewed about. Again, a presence is not intimidation. Threats are.

Threats are also a crime and should be reported to the police and to the poll workers so that appropriate action can be taken.


I disagree. Standing in front of a polling place wearing combat boots, paramilitary uniforms, and carrying clubs IS intimidating and that is the intent of the black panther's actions.


This is intimidating?




Unlike in the 2008 election, members of the organization labeled as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center were not wielding billy clubs or forming clusters.


www.foxnews.com...#

If that's intimidating, then grow thicker skin.

Also:


Zack Stalberg, president and CEO of the Committee of Seventy, a Philadelphia government watchdog group, said his group had received no complaints as of midday Tuesday regarding the presence of New Black Panther Party officials at polling stations.


Much ado about nothing IMO.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 

How did the KKK scumbags in past decades intimidate? The black people still got their own booth to vote in and no one was standing right there, at their shoulder, as they filled in their blanks (After they got that far for being able to vote at all). I've heard about this from instructors at school who were here and lived it. It was incredible to hear about the blatant and very clear efforts to intimidate the vote and play other games with things like a poll tax. That aside though, the mere presence of a few "Good 'ol boys" with sticks doing NOTHING but standing by their pick-up trucks and chatting loudly was enough to drive home the point and insure an impact on turn out.

The fact the skin color is reversed in some places today makes nothing better or different. If I'd been alive in the 50's and 60's, I'd probably have been among the victims counted in the white civil right workers killed by OTHER whites who wouldn't tolerate a fair process. I sure as heck would have fought what I've heard described in such detail.

Likewise...This needs fought today. In 2008..it was just 1 or 2 panthers. Eric Holder dismissed a solid criminal case against them ...and now look. It's a BUNCH of them in multiple places by reports. This is what comes when criminal action is ignored, IMO.

edit on 6-11-2012 by Wrabbit2000 because: typo



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:04 PM
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reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


Let me clarify. The act of standing outside a polling location for the purposes of intimidation is, in my personal opinion, shameful.

I am not debating the legality of these actions as that applies to everyone's local laws differently and I am not aware of the federal statute pertaining to this issue, if such a thing exists.

I have to agree with you though, if a persons actions are legal, and furthermore constitutionally protected, then I support them one hundred percent. That being said I reserve my right to express my personal opinion just as it is your right.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


That's a lot of anger and no proof.

The reports don't even have proof that there's intimidation, just someone drove by and saw a group wearing the same clothes. You offer nothing but baseless fear and historical references to back up your anger. No substance to your argument.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by anoobgirl
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


Let me clarify. The act of standing outside a polling location for the purposes of intimidation is, in my personal opinion, shameful.


This is the crux of the argument here. Who's place is it to say that the black panthers are at a polling location for the purpose of intimidation? Unless their actions and/or words are intimidating, then one can only make assumptions as to the purpose of their presence.

My personal assumption is that the Black Panthers are present as observers to make sure voters (black voters in particular) are not intimidated by other groups that are also present at the polling locations.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


I just have to say I LOVE the picture you have chosen to back up your point. Not only is he standing there talking to little old (insert politically correct term darker skinned people here) women, but one of them has what appears to be an Obama pin on her coat! Great selection on your part.

As I stated previously I didn't start this thread in order to commence a flame war or argument. I was looking for individual ATS members personal experiences at the polls today. What I observed is open to interpretation and is proof of nothing more than my personal experience. As another ATS member reported, he visited the very same polling station and had a much different experience.



edit on 6-11-2012 by anoobgirl because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by anoobgirl
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


Let me clarify. The act of standing outside a polling location for the purposes of intimidation is, in my personal opinion, shameful.


This is the crux of the argument here. Who's place is it to say that the black panthers are at a polling location for the purpose of intimidation? Unless their actions and/or words are intimidating, then one can only make assumptions as to the purpose of their presence.

My personal assumption is that the Black Panthers are present as observers to make sure voters (black voters in particular) are not intimidated by other groups that are also present at the polling locations.


You would be incorrect. The BBP has a long, decades old history of intimidation and violent, racist rhetoric. They are at polling stations to disuade anyone of a demographic they dislike from entering and as a show of force to their native demographic.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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Question? What in the blue bloody blazes are the Black Panthers doing at a polling place to begin with? Now or the past.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 

I'm sure then..anything you post and anything any other person posts today will have 100% proof and ABSOLUTE evidence to back every single thing said. (makes a note) Indeed...... Those calling for proof fit for a court of law will absolutely have that demanded OF them on ANYTHING reported.

Putting people down because the "proof" isn't to your personal standards is cheesy and cheap. Period.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by NavyDoc
You would be incorrect. The BBP has a long, decades old history of intimidation and violent, racist rhetoric. They are at polling stations to disuade anyone of a demographic they dislike from entering and as a show of force to their native demographic.


No, I would be incorrect if I had stated that in past elections; but not in this case. This time around, things seem to be different. No batons. No large groups. No intimidating language. Nope, none of that. All we have here is a peaceful presence. You act as if these black panthers are chasing people from the polling stations, blocking them from entering the polling place, threatening peoples lives and/or robbing them of their ballots.




Originally posted by anoobgirl
reply to post by LeatherNLace
 


I just have to say I LOVE the picture you have chosen to back up your point. Not only is he standing there talking to little old (insert politically correct term darker skinned people here) women, but one of them has what appears to be an Obama pin on her coat! Great selection on your part.


FYI, I didn't choose that picture; Fox News did. Follow the link I provided and see for yourself.

Well, then there is this regarding the Black Panther in the picture:



Fox News confirmed he is a designated poll watcher.


Get that? Legal, approved, authorized, legitimate poll watcher....how intimidating.
edit on 6-11-2012 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by anoobgirl
 


The questions we have for you do not need pictures or proof if you can explain to us what made you feel like they were being intimidating.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by NavyDoc
You would be incorrect. The BBP has a long, decades old history of intimidation and violent, racist rhetoric. They are at polling stations to disuade anyone of a demographic they dislike from entering and as a show of force to their native demographic.


No, I would be incorrect if I had stated that in past elections; but not in this case. This time around, things seem to be different. No batons. No large groups. No intimidating language. Nope, none of that. All we have here is a peaceful presence. You act as if these black panthers are chasing people from the polling stations, blocking them from entering the polling place, threatening peoples lives and/or robbing them of their ballots.




ANd your are acting that a member of a violent, racist, hate group can be a neutral observer.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by NavyDoc

Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by NavyDoc
You would be incorrect. The BBP has a long, decades old history of intimidation and violent, racist rhetoric. They are at polling stations to disuade anyone of a demographic they dislike from entering and as a show of force to their native demographic.


No, I would be incorrect if I had stated that in past elections; but not in this case. This time around, things seem to be different. No batons. No large groups. No intimidating language. Nope, none of that. All we have here is a peaceful presence. You act as if these black panthers are chasing people from the polling stations, blocking them from entering the polling place, threatening peoples lives and/or robbing them of their ballots.




ANd your are acting that a member of a violent, racist, hate group can be a neutral observer.


Not only can he be, he is being a neutral observer. Of course you would already know this if you bothered to read the 500-word Fox News article I linked above. Nope, instead, you want to live in the past and keep your hate and fear alive. Enjoy that...let me know how it works out for you.



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
reply to post by Feltrick
 

How did the KKK scumbags in past decades intimidate? The black people still got their own booth to vote in and no one was standing right there, at their shoulder, as they filled in their blanks (After they got that far for being able to vote at all). I've heard about this from instructors at school who were here and lived it. It was incredible to hear about the blatant and very clear efforts to intimidate the vote and play other games with things like a poll tax. That aside though, the mere presence of a few "Good 'ol boys" with sticks doing NOTHING but standing by their pick-up trucks and chatting loudly was enough to drive home the point and insure an impact on turn out.

The fact the skin color is reversed in some places today makes nothing better or different. If I'd been alive in the 50's and 60's, I'd probably have been among the victims counted in the white civil right workers killed by OTHER whites who wouldn't tolerate a fair process. I sure as heck would have fought what I've heard described in such detail.

Likewise...This needs fought today. In 2008..it was just 1 or 2 panthers. Eric Holder dismissed a solid criminal case against them ...and now look. It's a BUNCH of them in multiple places by reports. This is what comes when criminal action is ignored, IMO.

edit on 6-11-2012 by Wrabbit2000 because: typo


I am not advocating voter intimidation in any way but to compare the KKK to the Black Panthers is not a fair equation by any means. How many whites were killed by the Black Panthers? How many blacks were killed by the KKK? The Black Panthers may threaten violence but the Klan has actually committed violence. I drove through College Park Ga in the ninties when they still had their annual Klan parade downtown. If someone had asked me was I afraid I would have said no. I was raised to fear no one but God. But seeing those guys there stirred something in me that I didn't know existed. Generational fear. My fear was the fear that my ancestors had instilled in them about the Klan. So no it's not the same to compare the
Klan to the Black Panther party. The Klan has a history of death and violence not threats.





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