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Good or bad idea to hire overqualified workers in times of recession.

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posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Managers who have started to hire again face another problem: how to handle all the overqualified candidates coming through their doors. The prevailing wisdom is to avoid such applicants.

What the Experts Say

Recruiters have traditionally hesitated to place overqualified candidates because of several presumed risks says Berrin Erdogan, a professor of management at Portland State University and the lead author of a recent study on the subject. "The assumption is that the person will be bored and not motivated, so they will underperform or leave." However, her research shows that these risks may be more perceived than real. In fact, sales associates in her study who were thought to be overqualified actually performed better. And rarely do people move on simply because they feel they're too talented for the job. "People don't stay or leave a company because of their skills. They stay or leave because of working conditions" she says.

Source: HBR Harvard Business Review

I do not completely agree with that conclusion and in my opinion it isn't that simple. When jobs are difficult to find anybody overqualified would be willing to work no matter the working conditions. Within all reasonable circumstances of course... But what when the economic climate begins to shift and the sun begins to shine again? Will a former overqualified worker stay or leave..? What consequences will that have for the employer and his company? Can we assume that an overqualified worker will be a benifit for the production and future of a company?

What are your thoughts on the matter...what would you do as an employer and owner of a company?


edit on 5/11/2012 by zatara because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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This is exactly what i ran into. I moved from Houston to a rather small town and all i heard when i applied for jobs is that i was way over qualified. They assumed that i would not stay with them because i supposedly could go anywhere in the world and get a better paying job than what they could offer. I am stuck here taking care of my aging mother. Not that i mind taking care of her but life is passing me by.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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I understand the risk of hiring an overqualified employee greatest of which is that they will always be ready to leave as soon as something equal to their level comes along. I think applicants who know they are overqualified should lie, and leave off some certain years of school or certain degrees and certifications.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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When I was looking for employment quite a few years back I was rejected by many employers due to my management background and my experience running a small business. I was actually told at one interview that I would not be considered for the job that I had applied for simply because I would be a risk to the other management that was currently employed by the company.


So basically they told me in the interview that they currently had sub par employees in positions of power, but they were comfortable with it, and had no intentions of putting them in a potentially uncomfortable position of actually having to earn their paychecks.

They can word it however they want the bottom line is most managers/employers won't hire over qualified individuals simply because it is a threat to either their own job, or the jobs of people that they are protecting that are already liked within the company.
edit on 11/5/2012 by SpaDe_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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Overqualified individuals will leave as soon as a better opportunity (read-$$) comes along. Highly qualified individuals are adept at the corporate game and that game includes taking what you must for a limited time until the better opportunity comes along. It's business.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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It is highly dependent upon the situation, industry, position, etc

I always assume an over-qualified person is a flight risk for anything better that comes along. If it's a low-level position that doesn't require a ton of investment by the employer in ramp-up, etc. and is relatively easy to refill, then go ahead and hire. However, if you are investing a lot of time and resources in someone that is likely to leave, then it's usually best to hire someone that is more likely to stay on when the job economy improves.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by jimmiec
 


It is my personal opinion that it all depends on the nature of work to be done wether you are hired or not. Of course your pay will stay the same compared to an "un-educated" candidate. In times of recession I would hire an over-qualified person for the more "brainy" stages in the production process. If I were you I would not be discouraged and seek out companies with "brainy" jobs within the production process which are in normal times done by workers with lower levels of education. Lower level jobs which require no specific craftsmanship.
edit on 5/11/2012 by zatara because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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Im currently overqualified for my position but, it was a step in my industry, so i bit it and took the offer.

Even people around me know that i won't be sticking around in this position for too long.

What happens to an over qualified employee?

You do get bored, because its not challenging, but its up to the individual, i try to get my work done and then take it easy.

Higher ups, like supervisor and manager are a bit afraid that possible candidate might replace them because education from than and now is different.

Also, they might just be looking for someone to stay in this position for a long time(less paper work and hassle).



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by SpaDe_
 



They can word it however they want the bottom line is most managers/employers won't hire over qualified individuals simply because it is a threat to either their own job, or the jobs of people that they are protecting that are already liked within the company.


I think you nailed it right here. The rest is just excuses



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by zatara
"People don't stay or leave a company because of their skills. They stay or leave because of working conditions" she says.


I agree. Most people generally quit bosses, not jobs.

In terms of your question, it depends how big the delta of experience to role is...

Regardless, in my view, it's a meaningless concern. Unless you have HUGE on-boarding and training costs, I think it's dumb to exclude such candidates.
edit on 5-11-2012 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Everyone needs to eat no matter how much eduacation you have.. people who need tmp jobs are there anything bad at it ?



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 01:49 PM
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Robotics and computer systems account for something like 75% of productivity, we should all be flipping burgers...

edit on 5-11-2012 by ConspiracyBuff because: Face!



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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The few times I have looked for/gotten a job since owning my own business, I am blunt and upfront about things. One of the first questions I ask in an interview, is if there is chance for advancement up the chain. If yes, then I find out what is needed from me to do so, and do it. If no, then I make it very clear that I will take the job, but if something better comes along, I will be out of there. Some people appreciate my drive and ambition, others are threatened by it. You can tell by their eyes which one they are usually. The ones that are threatened, are usually not the kind of person I would want to work for anyways, they are usually miserable and terrible bosses.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by micmerci
Overqualified individuals will leave as soon as a better opportunity (read-$$) comes along. Highly qualified individuals are adept at the corporate game and that game includes taking what you must for a limited time until the better opportunity comes along. It's business.


Yeah but a business will let you go at the drop of a hat to make more money if they feel they can get by without you so its a two way street. Companies want loyalty from employees yet they offer not loyalty in return...

I agree with the poster above do not put all your qualifications on the application. No need to lie just leave off what is not necessary to get the job.





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