What Happened to the 50,000 Homeless in NYC During Hurricane Sandy?

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posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 11:46 AM
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www.housingworks.org...

youtu.be...



I keep wondering, did they seek shelter in a safe location, how many mentally ill are homeless and not capable of even thinking about seeking shelter?

Everyday I wonder about the homeless, but I haven't heard anything.
www.coalitionforthehomeless.org...

In New York City...
• Each night more than 50,000 people -- including more than 20,000 children -- experience homelessness.
• Currently 46,600 homeless men, women, and children bed down each night in the NYC municipal shelter system.
• Additionally, more than 5,000 homeless adults and children sleep each night in other public and private shelters, and thousands more sleep rough on the streets or in other public spaces.
• During the course of each year, more than 110,000 different homeless New Yorkers, including more than 40,000 children, sleep at least one night in the municipal shelter system.
• The number of homeless New Yorkers in shelters has risen by more than half over the past decade.




posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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Like the camps of the migrant workers caught in hurricane Andrew in 92 the homeless won't be counted. City employees will be under gag orders to remain silent while government freezer trucks load the corpses and haul them off for incineration.
Don't believe me? The number of dead become a direct reflection on the political entities responsible for alerting and protecting the citizens of this country. The fewer dead = better ratings in the polls. Can't have anything messing with that and that is exactly what happened in Florida.
While I hope that most made it to shelters I know there were a great number who either didn't believe the warnings, didn't get the warnings or just didn't care. I have no doubt they will fund hundreds if not thousands of bodies down in the tunnels and washed out in the bay.
I'm glad you made this thread. Certainly the homeless deserve consideration in this disaster as it's not just mostly a lifestyle choice but a situation increasingly forced on more and more of us by economic pressures.
Let's hope for the best here.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
Like the camps of the migrant workers caught in hurricane Andrew in 92 the homeless won't be counted. City employees will be under gag orders to remain silent while government freezer trucks load the corpses and haul them off for incineration.
Don't believe me? The number of dead become a direct reflection on the political entities responsible for alerting and protecting the citizens of this country. The fewer dead = better ratings in the polls. Can't have anything messing with that and that is exactly what happened in Florida.
While I hope that most made it to shelters I know there were a great number who either didn't believe the warnings, didn't get the warnings or just didn't care. I have no doubt they will fund hundreds if not thousands of bodies down in the tunnels and washed out in the bay.
I'm glad you made this thread. Certainly the homeless deserve consideration in this disaster as it's not just mostly a lifestyle choice but a situation increasingly forced on more and more of us by economic pressures.
Let's hope for the best here.


The "just didn't care" part--how does one help people who just don't care or are too (lazy, insane, stupid, criminal or whatever the reason) to seek help that is available or to heed warnings. How can you help people who refuse to help themselves? Not to disregard these people, but in a quandry about the topic. Using force seems untenable and would tie up resources and would raise civil liberty concerns.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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I'll tell you what happened to them AFTER Sandy .. none of them got any of the supplies from the cancelled NYC Marathon. Thread here This will seriously make you
.... I don't know where all this supposed 'good job' is that Bloomberg and Obama and Christie are slapping each other on the backs for. UGH!



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 


civil liberty concerns aside, hopefully, i think the homeless would fare better because they are already homeless and much wiser to survival skills in the city. at least those who are of good health and sound of mind.

the rest i worry about...



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
reply to post by NavyDoc
 


civil liberty concerns aside, hopefully, i think the homeless would fare better because they are already homeless and much wiser to survival skills in the city. at least those who are of good health and sound of mind.

the rest i worry about...


You are right, some would make the conscious decision to ingnore warnings or to get help for a variety of reasons--be they in hiding, resent authority, on the lam for criminal activity, lack trust in the system, and believe they can do a better job surviving on their own.

OTOH, many people are homeless because of poor decision making skills that would mean lack of judgement where a disaster was concerned.

Other than making services available and spreading the information about such services as widely as practicable, I don't really see a solution to save these people without resorting to some sort of draconian measure.



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 





Like the camps of the migrant workers caught in hurricane Andrew in 92 the homeless won't be counted. City employees will be under gag orders to remain silent while government freezer trucks load the corpses and haul them off for incineration.


NO!?

Sadly that crossed my mind, they wont be counted will they?

edit on 123030p://bMonday2012 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by FlyersFan
I'll tell you what happened to them AFTER Sandy .. none of them got any of the supplies from the cancelled NYC Marathon. Thread here This will seriously make you
.... I don't know where all this supposed 'good job' is that Bloomberg and Obama and Christie are slapping each other on the backs for. UGH!


Yea, I read about that.

Nowhere to run: Homeless battle elements as Superstorm Sandy hits


Whilst those efforts have been lauded, reports online suggest that many homeless were left on the streets, bunked in doorways, as the storm approached on Monday.
rt.com...
With no promise of assistance or a bed, New York’s homeless community did whatever they could to survive the storm. For one person, that meant traveling to Newark Liberty International Airport.

Speaking to New Jersey News from a covered entrance to Terminal B, 60-year-old Dorothy Howe said, “This is the safest place a homeless person could be right now.”

Howe took a bus from downtown Newark to the airport on Sunday afternoon, before New Jersey Transit halted all bus, train, and light rail services.

“I didn’t know where to go,” she said.

article by freelance journalist, Julia Reinhart, the system has become a maze of complicated rules which make many of the city’s most needy ineligible for a bed.


Dear lord



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
reply to post by NavyDoc
 


civil liberty concerns aside, hopefully, i think the homeless would fare better because they are already homeless and much wiser to survival skills in the city. at least those who are of good health and sound of mind.

the rest i worry about...


I worried about those that made their homes underground, would they be suspecting such a flood of the subway system?



posted on Nov, 5 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 





I don't really see a solution to save these people without resorting to some sort of draconian measure.


Did you get to hear the poem at the end of the video I posted?



posted on Nov, 6 2012 @ 08:27 PM
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The "just didn't care" part--how does one help people who just don't care or are too (lazy, insane, stupid, criminal or whatever the reason) to seek help that is available or to heed warnings. How can you help people who refuse to help themselves? Not to disregard these people, but in a quandry about the topic. Using force seems untenable and would tie up resources and would raise civil liberty concerns.


True enough - but I think the real crime here (socio-economic jargon aside for the moment) is that they are being hidden, secretively shipped out, and "disposed of" into what basically amounts to a modern-day mass grave.

Maybe we can't help them in life, but we can at least give them the benefit of being acknowledged in death.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


I can attest to this.
Galveston Island has a very large homeless population...or had one, before Ike hit in 2008.

There were way more black body bags down there than what was accounted for and reported to the public, per the EMT and paramedics who worked the aftermath.

I had to go to the courthouse on the Island about 3 months after Ike, and it still looked like a nuclear bomb had gone off.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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What are they gonna do. They have not much skills, no address, no phone so they can't get a job very easy. Some of them probably have jobs but can't afford rent anywhere, or else can't find a place to rent. So if you're on the street say in a soup line and someone tells you that they know of a hide out in the subway, where at least your out of the rain and snow, and marginal safety as there's no one around to mug you, then you'd probably at least check it out as you'd be better off there than on the street. So you go into the subway to sleep. Then in the morning you go out and roam around NYC and try and find some food and stuff. Then at night go back to the subway to sleep in peace.

Okay funny story.....

There's this girl who lived in NYC. She was on the website POF. She was homeless but she was good looking. So what she did was she booked lunch dates for a whole year. She would agree to meet the guy at a certain place for a date as long as the guy agreed to buy her lunch. And she did dinner dates. So she ate for a whole year for free until she was eventually able to get back on her feet and find a job. Just sounds so crazy ha ha. Thats' a true story.



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by stupid girl
reply to post by Asktheanimals
 

...

I had to go to the courthouse on the Island about 3 months after Ike, and it still looked like a nuclear bomb had gone off.


Greetings:

We can attest to this, as we were First Responders based in Sulphur, LA, and opened main roads to Beaumont 'on the way to work' in the Beaumont area on a daily basis - Orange, Lumberton, Vidor, Nederland, etc., and were first-in to Sabine Pass escorting LEO's to the FD.

Where we adopted 'Sammy' Sabine...





The entire coast looked like a nuclear bomb went off. The community of Gilchrist was obliterated.

All of High Island and miles inland was inundated. We were picking up boats 10 miles inland in fields!

We eventually moved into a house in Lumberton and spent a delightful six months in your truly hospitable Texas.

Thanks for the memories.

Peace Love Light
tfw
[color=magenta]Liberty & Equality or Revolution



posted on Nov, 7 2012 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by thorfourwinds
 


Your dogs picture made me and my wife laugh. He looks like a character.

I have heard that a lot of the "moles" were expected to be found drowned in the tunnels.

Regardless, if what asktheanimals is true....that is horrendous and grim. Having a problem is not an issue. Failing to acknowledge and address it is reprehensible.



posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 07:11 AM
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One of them escaped the disaster and now is pursuing his career as a music artist..... see




posted on Nov, 8 2012 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by thorfourwinds
 


What a cutie!

Well, I'm originally from Louisiana so I basically just moved from one hurricane zone to another, here on the TX Gulf Coast.
I've ridden-out hurricanes, I've evacuated for hurricanes, I've partied during hurricanes (LA tradition is to have "hurricane parties" where you drink hurricane cocktails while riding out the storm....yes, we are insane), and I've seen more hurricane aftermath than I care to recount.
Having said all that, the aftermath of Ike was a bit strange to me. I think one of the things that stood out to me the most was the fact that there was nothing green for months afterward. Nothing. No bushes, all grass was dead, even the palm trees were dead. And what wasn't dead was completely bare of foliage, so it looked dead. It was a very strange, macabre landscape for quite a while. Almost Tim Burton-ish.....if that makes any sense at all.

My theory for the difference in the Ike aftermath is that of all the hurricane damage I've seen, none of it included the breadth and scope of saltwater inundation in an overly vegetative area the size of Galveston Island. Most of the saltwater inundation I've seen is marshland or industrial beach head. No one really lives on the "beach" in Louisiana because there really aren't any beaches. The few stretches of coast that we pass off as our "beaches" pretty much look like a prairie that ends in the ocean....lol.
So Ike was really the first time I saw the magnitude of damage that saltwater does to non-brackish vegetation. That's my theory, anyway.

Y'all are awesome for your volunteer work and especially for rescuing little Sammy!



posted on Nov, 19 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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I spent hours, literally, online looking for the dead from Hurricane Ike(no links, google is fast). I am still sickened and heartsore after all these years by the deliberate lies about the death toll. The media discussed ad nauseum the 10s of thousands staying, including those in the famous bar (I can't remember the name, sorry), who partied through the storm.

After the hurricane, the media showed the crumpled bar sign, the blasted spot where the bar was, but no mention was made of the human lives lost. Stories were posted about using landlines and cell phones to stay in touch with friends at the bar, but suddenly no calls connected. On the forums and websites that talked about this tragedy,certain posters claimed that all those people evacuated in time, are dispersed around this huge country of ours, and can't be found know. riiiiiight.

So, knowing how this has all played out in the past, I'm not surprised by the blatant omission . Horrified, yes, but not surprised. If the truth were to be known, we'd find millions truly died from these superstorms that cleared the rabble and middle class from some beautiful landscape and the shores of the USA, Japan, and the Indian Ocean (after the Boxing day Tsunami 2004).

Amazing how these superstorms have already 'taken care' of some of the 'excess population.'



posted on Nov, 19 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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I was thinking the same thing when I saw the subways in NYC flooded, where did the people living down there go? Did they even know what was coming? And for days after the storm I never heard anything mentioned on the news about the homeless. Not one story or any information.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 08:27 AM
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Thank all of you for posting the personal knowledge of the subject.





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