The mayan calendar end date is not 2012, its 2087, 100% proof here.

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posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 08:40 PM
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I find it funny that when you take 25,920, and you divide it by 360, you get exactly 72....

72 years.....
The earth goes through 1 degree, every 72 years.... if each year is 360 days long.

This math is perfect with the zodiac, and perfect with the mayan calendar.

As soon as we add 365.25 into the mix, we screw it up, and it gets lost and confused.

the 360 day year makes everything so much simpler.

1 baktun = 144,000 days divided by 360, and you get 400 , of the 360 day years.

1,872,000 days is the length of the 13 baktuns which equals, 5200, of the 360 day years.

so it seems the complications come in when we use the 5200 years, on the current calendar system... we can't do it. we cannot add 5200 onto 3113BC, because we get 2087AD but that is also wrong because we're crossing 365.25 with 360 day years....So what really needs to be done here, is to figure out the difference between the years, and see how many 360 day years, have passed since 3113 BC....

So now I must admit that my 2087AD date is wrong because of the crossing of the calendars.

I would like to figure out the math, without crossing the calendars, of the 360 day years... I think this is very important to figuring this out.

The calculations will have to be done in days, and days only. Years are irrelevant.

The length of the cycle we are looking at is 1,872,000 days

So if we can start at augustt 11th, 3113BC as day one, what year would it be, 1,872,000 days into the future, using 360 day years? It would have to be converted to our current calendar. seeing as we lose 5 days per year, every year, I can imagine there would be a big time difference after 1,872,000 days. Which is 5200, 360 day years. or 5125.24 days on our current calendar.

So using the math I have available, is it safe to say that 5200, 360 day years, equals, 5125.24 365.25 day years? If this is the case, then dec 21st 2012, is the date both calculations end.

The only real way to do this is to count the days from august 11th, 3113BC and see where you wind up 1,872,000 days into the future.

I have been doing math all day. After my initial post, I have revised several times, and while the 2087AD end date does sound plausible, I am starting to see the flaws in the math regarding the crossing of the calendars, and the misinterpretations associated with it. We are definitely dealing with 360 day years here, but the real question is, how does it convert to 365 day years, that is beyond my math skills for the time being, I'm tired. But from what I can tell, they do fold back onto each other to both target the same day of dec 21,2012.




posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by xxshadowfaxx
 


I like to think regardless of what constellation we go through and how long, you could draw 12 equal lines in the sky which would take roughly 2,160 to pass through each. Maybe we are in one constellation longer than the other somewhere down the track but it really doesn't matter in the end.

As for the days in the year, is it possible that the planet slightly slowed down somewhere in the past which gives us the 365 day calendar and the 5 days which the Egyptians refered to as the days of the dead/or nothing?
edit on 4-11-2012 by DarknStormy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You are also ignoring the fact that their 360 day count equaled 1 solar year (not calendar year).
There are 365.24219 days in a solar year and 365 days in a calander year. A Maya year is 360 days long. Notice how all three are different? There are also sidereal and anomalistic years. Most people do not understand the concept of measuring time as it can be confusing.

You would not want to use years to figure out an end date with a discrepancy of 5.24219 days per year. Since days are both the same you would need to use those numbers to calculate the end date.

reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You can't divide the number of days by 360, and then turn around and say that it's our calendar year 2087, because, our calendar year is based on a 365.25 system. You have to divide it by that number. If you don't you end up with a "Mayan" date.
Not having done the math myself I don't disagree with your scepticism here but I can't follow your argument. I think the best way to calculate this would be to convert the total Maya calander time into days/hour/min/sec in decimals, which is a sexagesimal system, then convert it back to a corrosponding date on our current calader so we can predict its arival. I am assuming that this is what the OP is talking about.


reply to post by siriusstarlight
 


Actually the end of this asrological year, Pisces, is 2160. I have often thought the Maya end date of 2012 is wrong because of this astrological alignment, or the coming of the age of Aquarius. The Maya were brilliant time keepers, i.e. astronomers. they would often use alignments with other planets, such as Venus, to measure time which happens to be more accurate than how we do it today. They did not need leap years/min/sec to adjust their calanders.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by Devino
Actually the end of this asrological year, Pisces, is 2160. I have often thought the Maya end date of 2012 is wrong because of this astrological alignment, or the coming of the age of Aquarius. The Maya were brilliant time keepers, i.e. astronomers. they would often use alignments with other planets, such as Venus, to measure time which happens to be more accurate than how we do it today. They did not need leap years/min/sec to adjust their calanders.


I agree that the next age may start in another 148 years. But we have to remember some time was lost 2000 years ago. What if it was up to 100 years lost? Just because we put events in certain years, doesn't mean it is entirely correct.... We could of lost heaps of time along the way and still haven't realised it.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by xxshadowfaxx
 

I have calculated the synodic periods of Venus with Earth and found it can be quite difficult. Try counting 583.92 days (x 5) to detrmine what date and time it would be on our calander.

I used an astronomical program called Celestia to help me. This program has a "Set Simulated Time" window that time can be converted to a Julian date which is number of days with hour/min/sec in decimals that are based on a sexagesimal system. As I type this the Julian calander has the time at 2456236.62609 which is 04 November 2012 19:01:34. Using this converter I figured out these times and a Gregorian calander date to the accuracy within seconds.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:19 PM
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reply to post by DarknStormy
 


I agree that the next age may start in another 148 years. But we have to remember some time was lost 2000 years ago. What if it was up to 100 years lost? Just because we put events in certain years, doesn't mean it is entirely correct.... We could of lost heaps of time along the way and still haven't realised it.
That is why I used the alignment of the stars to determine the astrological ages. We currently are close to the upcoming age of Aquarius, but not quite.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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Ive done the math and and i worked on your theory which gave me the year 2087Ad. I then worked out the conversion to make our calender a 360 day one and it gave me 2012ad. I dont know if i did it right but this is what i did:
5200years x 5.25 missing days = 27300 days
27300 days / 360 day year = 75.83 years
2087 - 75 = 2012.

Something along them lines anyway, im tired. For some reason the .83 takes it to 2011 but you kind of get the idea. Or i could be 100% wrong?

ETA: i suppose it depends on which date in 3113BC the calender started why the .83 takes it to 2011?
edit on 4-11-2012 by MUFC87 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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By the ops calculations, it is year 2087 right now.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by Devino
reply to post by DarknStormy
 


I agree that the next age may start in another 148 years. But we have to remember some time was lost 2000 years ago. What if it was up to 100 years lost? Just because we put events in certain years, doesn't mean it is entirely correct.... We could of lost heaps of time along the way and still haven't realised it.
That is why I used the alignment of the stars to determine the astrological ages. We currently are close to the upcoming age of Aquarius, but not quite.

Some people claimed hundreds of years ago we were in the age of aquarius. Others say we wont be for hundreds more......... And theres signs to indicate both. Astrology is basically bull shizzle



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by MUFC87
 


buggered if i know.. We could be in 2011 right now because of a mis-calculation. Wouldn't surprise me either.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 

It appears as if you believe understanding and converting these times is easy. The question I have is how they figured the start date of August 11, 3114 BCE? Could this date be incorrect?



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


What I want to know is why the hell 2012 years ago, time started over
.. Wouldn't the ancients just continue adding to the time they already had instead of saying, screw it, lets start again? I think 2000 years ago marked the start of an age and the age was pisces.. When Aquarius comes around, we will know about it and the same thing may happen. Then again, we might be dead and never know.

The other thing is, the Mayans and the Egyptians didn't get together one day and said to each other, lets start our calendar at 3114/3123 and when the time runs out we will just start the other way and head back up. Something must of happened and I don't think it was a man returning from the dead that caused it.
edit on 4-11-2012 by DarknStormy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by Devino
 



I could really care less when the Mayan calendar ends to tell you the truth. However I noticed upon reading the thread that the OP had used 360 days as a calendar year, and then based that on the 365.25 calendar year we (most of the western world) uses.

Now, as you pointed out the Earth's orbit about the sun is not exactly 365.25 days, but is 365.256363004 days

Earth

Our calendar is based upon a 365 day year, with every 4th year having 366 days, hence using 365.25. So the idea of using 360 days for a year, then claiming that the date was wrong because the math gave him 5200 years, I felt it necessary to point out that his math was incorrect because our calendar dating system does not use 360 days as a year.

As far as the actual date? :shrug:, it will be just like when December 31st rolls around for us: a new year starts. Or when a decade finishes, a new decade starts, or a new century, or a new millennium.....the clock simply marches on.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by xxshadowfaxx
 


Dude...this couldnt get any simpler. 1,872,000 divided by 365.25 minus 3113? Comes up with 2012. We have a number of days and 3113 bc is a 365.25 year not a mayan year. Helloooo.... And Remember bc is a backwards count from 0, so 100 bc was 2112 years ago supposedly. Of course, it is slightly strange that the calendar is based on jesus's birth date....which no one actually knows. In fact he might not even have existed.

And the december 21st crap is crap. Thats simply the end of the mayan year. Im sick of hearing "it ends on a specific date omfg!". What do we expect to happen? An alien invasion? Im fairly sure its the next several months that are important, not a date. we will watch the nwo fail.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by Devino
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 

It appears as if you believe understanding and converting these times is easy. The question I have is how they figured the start date of August 11, 3114 BCE? Could this date be incorrect?


Not being an expert on Mayan history, I can't really answer that question, however I can suggest you start here with reading, and hopefully it will lead you to research that will show you why that is the start date. I know that it's suppose to be the beginning date of their creation myth, but that's all I know:

Mesoamerican Long Count



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by DarknStormy
 


As for the days in the year, is it possible that the planet slightly slowed down somewhere in the past which gives us the 365 day calendar
There are many calanders in the past that have a 360 day year. I think the time at which these calanders existed, found around the world, and the times in which these calanders started using the addition of 5 "Unlucky" days seems to correspond. This gives evidence that the Earth might have went through some event that slowed down its rotation slighly increasing the number of days per year. Biological evidence of the life cycles of coral and other cridders seem to dissagree with this theory.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by Devino
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 

It appears as if you believe understanding and converting these times is easy. The question I have is how they figured the start date of August 11, 3114 BCE? Could this date be incorrect?


Please quote me where I said it was easy... you noticed I didn't do any math.. i didn't need to... it's obvious you have to CONVERT the data to our calendar... that was my only point.. nor do i care when the actual day of the mayan calander ends... I have no idea where it starts either LMAO so your guess is as good as mine... but since we are talking mayan.. my best guess is to go with what is more astronomically accurate.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 

I suppose it depends upon which day of the year is being used to detrimne alignment. The Egyptians used the first day of spring which puts us at the end of Pisces. You can see for yourself using any good astronomical program.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by Devino
reply to post by phroziac
 

I suppose it depends upon which day of the year is being used to detrimne alignment. The Egyptians used the first day of spring which puts us at the end of Pisces. You can see for yourself using any good astronomical program.


But in saying that they also used Sirius and apparently new years in our modern calendar is a direct alignment of the Earth between the Sun and Sirius to mark the new year... Theres so many different ways its certainly confusing.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 

I haven't put that much time into it but from what I understand the begining date was figured out by comparing astronomical alignments between the Maya and Gregorian calander. Alignments such as planetary conjunctions and Solar/Lunar eclipses. The Maya had calculated astronomical alignments for thousands of years and had centuries of observations. Of coarse nearly all of this was destroyed with the arrival of the Spanish.





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