How to Locate the Page of a Website That Hosts a File?

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posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Whenever I'm reading a thread and there is a link posted, I always check out the Home page and the "About Me" or "About Us" page of that link before reading the content of the link itself, so that I know something about the entity that posted the link and the context in which the link was posted.

I have a link to a .pdf file and I'm trying to determine the context in which the file fits in to the website that posted it.

Here's a screenshot of the page linked to in the thread:



I went to patrickcrusade.org where this is the menu:



How do I figure out the context of linking to the .pdf file of Ringmakers of Saturn without clicking on each topic of the menu that seems related in some way, one by one - process of elimination? Is there an efficient way?




posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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www.patrickcrusade.org...

5th paragraph on the left column.

The way to figure it out is to use Google's "insite" keyword to filter your search results to a specific domain.
edit on 4-11-2012 by SilentKoala because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 05:14 AM
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Originally posted by SilentKoala
The way to figure it out is to use Google's "insite" keyword to filter your search results to a specific domain.


I've never heard of that.

I need to read up on it here? Google Insights



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 06:32 AM
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Google operators are what I would use. Someone mentioned the "insite" operator, which is handy. Also, for a specific file type, say a pdf, you can use the operator "ext: pdf" without the quotes. You can find a list of all the Google operators, and I suggest that everyone learn them, as they are extremely useful when wanting to find something. Even when just searching Google like always, I use them to get better results. I think there is an operator called "filetype" that is similar or maybe identical to the "ext" operator as well. I forget them a lot, the ones I don't use that is, so it is useful to brush up on their definitions every now and then.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 06:50 AM
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Originally posted by JiggyPotamus
Google operators are what I would use. Someone mentioned the "insite" operator, which is handy.


So, "insite" is one of a list of Google operators, and not the "Google Insights" that I linked to?



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by JiggyPotamus
Google operators are what I would use.


Found here? Google Search Operators

(I don't see "insite.")





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