New Jersey nuclear plant knocked offline, whats really going on?

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posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 12:46 AM
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No timeline for full power at New Jersey nuclear reactor


Public Service Enterprise Group Inc's provided no timeline for its Salem 1 nuclear plant to fully start-up after it shut down from superstorm Sandy.

Shouldnt this be major news considering the disaster at Fukushima?

While this wasnt a Tsunami, Sandy was an extremely powerful storm producing 95mph winds resulting in tidal waves.

Considering its history, there may be an even greater reason to be concerned.


P.S.E.&G.'s nuclear power operations have had problems for more than a decade. In the 1990's, the Salem reactors were shut down for two years because of maintenance problems. In 2004, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission took on additional oversight of the Salem County plants and stepped up the monitoring of them after consultants found a number of problems, including a leaky generator, unreliable controls on a reactor and workers who feared that reporting problems would lead to retaliation.

So whats really going on? The last thing that the Billion dollar nuclear energy industry needs is an outcry against dangerous, radioactive, toxic waste producing, nuclear energy.

What ARENT they telling us?

edit on 4-11-2012 by gladtobehere because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 12:51 AM
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They arent telling you that... they shut it down before the storm.

Now they're telling you that they're turning it back on.

It does make sense if you REALLY think about it.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 

It takes awhile to perform all the safety checks associated with doing a cold start up on a reactor.
Most likely nothing nefarious going on.



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 

Why would you trust the so called "authorities" to be forthcoming and honest?

When you REALLY think about it, they have a proven track record of lies and deceit.

Furthermore, this source seems to point to the same article but it looks like the original article may have been edited. There is now no mention of the water intake pumps being destroyed:

Source


Reuters is reporting no timeline for restarting unit 1 at Salem after a high wave from hurricane Sandy took out 5 of the 6 water intake pumps. PSEG says grid stability is not an issue. It is likely that the widespread outages still going on across the area mean there is less demand for power. It could also be that they are still repairing the intake pumps for Salem yet choose to not publicly disclose the status of this issue.


edit on 4-11-2012 by gladtobehere because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 01:45 AM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


Reuters is reporting no timeline for restarting unit 1 at Salem after a high wave from hurricane Sandy took out 5 of the 6 water intake pumps. PSEG says grid stability is not an issue. It is likely that the widespread outages still going on across the area mean there is less demand for power. It could also be that they are still repairing the intake pumps for Salem yet choose to not publicly disclose the status of this issue.

The plant is off line, not in crisis. "Took out" just means that the pumps were shut down due to rise in water level the night Sandy hit. External site power was also interrupted and that means that the combination of those two factors required them to take the plant off line in order to prevent an emergency, not because of one.

Restarting the plant will commence once they inspect everything? If there are problems that might take a little longer. It is an old reactor. Personally, I hope they shut em all down for good. Of course, thats impossible. People would scream...



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


...why is my electricity bill so high... yes that´s true, sadly



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by StareDad
 

I think this missed the point of the thread but if I had to take a guess, maybe its because both reactors are down and its costing more to provide energy?

That and the devaluation of the dollar.





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