Chrome and over 1 GB of RAM

page: 3
1
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 09:54 AM
link   
reply to post by SpearMint
 

in backround pages it says, browser 104 mb, ats (1) 310 mb, ats (2, in tab) 190 mb.




posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 09:56 AM
link   
reply to post by OptimusSubprime
 

yeah, my hard disk often pages. i run vista, very ram-hungry.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 09:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
What OS are you using? I ask because a newer OS like Windows 7 needs 2GB at a minimum to run, and chrome needs 1GB at a minimum. It's probably time to get a new computer.


More ram is always better but the minimum and recommended ram settings for windows 7 depend on the architecture and the version.

Windows 7 starter and home basic minimum : 32bit / 64bit - 512mb

Home premium , professional , ultimate & enterprise minimum : 32bit / 64bit - 1gb

The recommended amount is more like all 32bit versions 1gb and 64bit versions 2gb.


edit on 3-11-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 09:58 AM
link   
reply to post by SpearMint
 

i start my pc once a day and shut it down once a day. if i get speed issues again, i will try to reboot. now, it makes no sense, because everything is running fine.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 10:31 AM
link   
reply to post by icepack
 


Here are some mod tricks to help lower memory usage on Chrome

Chrome Memory Tweaks

sometimes this will help, but also depends on whats running within Chrome, I'll just stay with IE9, no issues with it since installed...modified version...

Name Abine
Status Enabled

Name EasyList
Status Enabled

Name EasyPrivacy Tracking Protection List
Status Enabled

Name Fanboy Adblock List
Status Enabled

Name Fanboy Tracking List
Status Enabled

Name From independent Privacy Professionals fighting for a transparent Internet
Status Enabled

Name Privacy Online
Status Enabled

Name Stop Google Tracking TPL
Status Enabled

Name UnConnect
Status Enabled

Name Your Personalized List
Status Enabled

and other tricks; most of the time its not the Brouser that has the problem, its what tries to run within the Brouser... example; toolbars are a big memory eater also



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 02:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by ChaoticOrder

Originally posted by Juggernog
reply to post by smurfy
 


Did.. you.. say.. AOL?

lol that's what I was wondering. I didn't think there was such a thing as an AOL browser anymore.


AOL UK uses AOL 9.6. AOL UK is a separate company from the US. It works very well, one useful feature is that it retrieves any web page that was not closed when you signed off, once you sign on again. I often have up to ten web pages open, and ready to roll when signing on.
edit on 3-11-2012 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 03:57 PM
link   
With a small amount of ram it can be tough to manage memory usage. Chrome uses a lot of ram when running multiple plug-ins and tabs. The nice thing about chrome is that is stays fairly constant if you always have the same pages open. Firefox on the other hand has a known memory leak that causes it to use more memory the longer it stays open, regardless of how many tabs/pages you have open.

The best thing you can do is clean up the programs that launch at start up, to free up as much ram as possible. Daily reboots help a lot too, giving the computer a chance to start again clean.

With win7 and vista there is a feature called Readyboost. It allows you to use a USB flash drive as virtual memory, speeding up your computer by giving it additional space to swap out programs.

Likely the reason you hear the HDD going crazy is because it is using the HDD as virtual memory, which is slow and causes wear and tear on the HDD.

A USB flash drive is much slower than actual RAM, but is faster than a HDD and will take some strain off your HDD.

Ram upgrade > USB virtual memory > HDD virtual memory

Using-memory-in-your-storage-device-to- speed-up-your-computer

That link is for windows 7, but it should be pretty much the same process for Vista.

DC



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 04:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by OptimusSubprime
What OS are you using? I ask because a newer OS like Windows 7 needs 2GB at a minimum to run, and chrome needs 1GB at a minimum. It's probably time to get a new computer.


It absolutely does not need 2gigs of ram to operate, i have this laptop running 33 processes of which some are anti virus, a firewall, and firefox and here is a snippit of the ram usage and process count.
This is win 7 32bit home premium, without the browser running, i can operate incredibly stably at less than 650 mb ram usage and 31 processes.



I think any browser that requires a gig of ram to itself is nothing more than a resource hog and should be avoided.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 04:48 PM
link   
aol versions after 9.0 all use some kinda super cache that stores a copy of every web page you ever visit. so i think it like, checks through all these before it renders a page.

also you can't clear it, it probably overwrites it when full. i think it was 250mb for the 9.5 version.

they also used to convert all image files to thier own format before downloading them to you, big waste of time.

these thing so overloaded my old computer, they are good reasons to switch isp's

aol search works real good for me though, so i still use that



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 04:59 PM
link   
Try using Opera.

Very small footprint, and does everything you expect it to.

9 tabs costs 253.5 mb. 2 tabs costs 232.8 mb. Ram goes back into free resources immediately. My browser of choice.

At least try it, and see the results, then decide if you really need Chrome or Firefox.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 05:24 PM
link   
Is 2GB even sufficient nowadays? I think that my OS alone runs on 2GB, with browser and background apps/processes around 4GB is consumed. When I work on 3d, I use from 10 to 26GB. With 32GB installed that leaves me with some extra. You can get 8GB sticks for dirt cheap now, & soon the price is going to drop even more with DDR4 and other types of emerging ultra-fast RAM.

If you're using a desktop, I suggest buying one or more 8GB sticks (G.Skill Ripjaws X Series is great) for $34 each. Easy to install and if you have enough extra you could create a RAMDisk for a boost of speed in your browser & other apps.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 05:53 PM
link   
reply to post by Druid42
 


I find it hard to believe anyone makes serious use of Chrome. It's not very compatible with the sites I go to and who in their right mind wants Goggle to track any more of what you are doing online? I almoost never search via Google directly -- I use StartPage instead. I do love U3 Opera on my U3 enabled 16Gb fast USB. It still leaves no trace on a public PC (as in hotels and lobbies).

!00% do concur, Opera is best on a PC and Opera Mini is by far the best on Android. I use AOL's browser in second place, and FireFox as 3rd best. IE9 is very close to FireFox IMO. Chrome is dead last among my installed browsers as far as I'm concerned and I almost never use it any more. I tried, and dumped, Safari and a few others. I'd use FireFox more often if it didn't start up so slowly and need updating so often. The updates play havoc with my password vault usability.

I don't know why people overlook AOL, probably just cultural bias and flat out ignorance. AOL, as I understand, includes a streamlined IE9, it has a well integrated email, AIM, video chat, large email can be sent and received, extremely large file transfers are permitted, and there are a host of other features. It's filters are extremely good at reducing spam too. Plus, you can use dialup if you travel in an area without broadband -- some still exist. Email can be stored on AOL and / or locally on your PC or Android for more sensitive documents. So, if you want, you can access a decade old critical email saved on AOL from any device you happen to be using wherever you are whether you own the system or not. High risk, easy to hack, cloud based storage is not needed and no extra steps are required. +if you prefer Outlook for email, you can hook it up with AOL. AOL is quite customizable.

Browser based email, all of them, is clunky in comparison to AOL and Outlook. They are like stepping back 20 years. So are the online calendars. I will note though that I'd prefer (paid) Eudora for email if I was allowed to use it at work. I don't like the distraction of "unpaid" Eudora.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:04 PM
link   
reply to post by BayesLike
 


Interesting , I think the AOL Explorer uses the Microsoft trident engine.


In 2003, AOL signed a seven-year contract with Microsoft to use Internet Explorer layout engine in their products and as such AOL Explorer uses this engine. Because of this, users can use AOL Explorer to download and install updates from Microsoft Update. However, unlike Internet Explorer, AOL does not use Bing as the default search engine.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by tinhattribunal
aol versions after 9.0 all use some kinda super cache that stores a copy of every web page you ever visit. so i think it like, checks through all these before it renders a page.

also you can't clear it, it probably overwrites it when full. i think it was 250mb for the 9.5 version.

they also used to convert all image files to thier own format before downloading them to you, big waste of time.

these thing so overloaded my old computer, they are good reasons to switch isp's

aol search works real good for me though, so i still use that


AOL 9.6 works perfect for me, like I said, on signing in all the pages I left open but minimised, are immediately available, and opened and of course refreshed, very useful if you want to peruse through them again. I think perhaps, I've had at the most 13 or 14 different web pages readily available on sign in. Any more than that will start to slow the system down, and if you no longer want a page just close it. A daily dose of disc cleanup takes economic care of the rest of the temporary files, cleanup is usually set for all and anything a week old which is satisfactory enough, unless you go clean daft.
edit on 3-11-2012 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:19 PM
link   
I just find it hard to believe that anyone still uses AOHELL... I really do



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Juggernog
 


It's pretty simple -- it's because it's better than anything else available today and it's all in one place. AOL 9.7 was the first software I loaded on each of the new systems I bought this year. Opera was second. My entire environment of bookmarks, old email, saved email, IM buddies, address book, current email, calendar, etc was all there -- ready for immediate use -- as soon as I signed on the first time. No hassles, nothing to transfer. It's always been this way -- for decades. Why would you prefer anything less?



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:55 PM
link   
I don't have problems with chrome, my rig runs just fine. Try reinstalling it.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 07:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by PhoenixOD
reply to post by BayesLike
 


Interesting , I think the AOL Explorer uses the Microsoft trident engine.


In 2003, AOL signed a seven-year contract with Microsoft to use Internet Explorer layout engine in their products and as such AOL Explorer uses this engine. Because of this, users can use AOL Explorer to download and install updates from Microsoft Update. However, unlike Internet Explorer, AOL does not use Bing as the default search engine.




The Explorer shell if you like, has not been updated. The current system works just as well, which is good and since they have must some brainiac still working for them, and selling stuff to Microsoft, (who'd have thought) the home page is very much to the LCD though, but easily ignored. Best link is the Huff post, which they own now anyway. they own other stuff like blogging sites, which makes them a bit nosy, nah! very nosy.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 08:31 PM
link   
reply to post by icepack
 


It's always hard to diagnose these things.
But if you have a memory leak you may want to reboot your pc.

There is also this app.
technet.microsoft.com...

Rammap. It will let you free up ram that's not being freed up by programs after use.
I use it at work and it's great.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 10:52 PM
link   
reply to post by icepack
 


Try this for increasing your virtual ram.

How to Increase Virtual Memory?


Virtual memory is simulated RAM. When you have used up all your RAM, your computer will shift data to an empty space on the hard drive. The computer swaps data to the hard disk and back to your RAM as needed. When you increase your virtual memory you are increasing the empty space that is reserved for your RAM overflow.


And there's also a Windows feature called ReadyBoost,

ReadyBoost


Want a simple way to speed up your PC? Just plug in a USB flash drive or card and let ReadyBoost borrow it. ReadyBoost is designed to help when your PC's memory is running low. Low memory can make your computer sluggish because Windows, which needs a place to stash data, turns to the hard drive. Flash memory offers a speedier alternative. ReadyBoost works with most flash storage devices. In Windows 7, it can handle more flash memory and even multiple devices—up to eight, for a maximum 256 gigabytes (GB) of additional memory.


ReadyBoost is great for lap tops/netbooks because adding more ram is not an option but also works great for desktops as well. So if you can't buy new ram for your PC then at least these options above should help.





new topics
top topics
 
1
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join



atslive.com

hi-def

low-def