Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Civilian Emergency Preparedness Think Tank

page: 1
1

log in

join

posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:36 PM
link   
Given such disasters as Katrina, Fukushima, and now Sandy and the inability of all government agencies and their bureaucratic think tanks to deal with and learn from such events, do you think there is a need for several private and public emergency preparedness think tanks which can compile reports, write papers, and submit ideas to local, state, and federal government agencies? Do you think citizen emergency preparedness lobbying groups need to be formed to lobby legislatures to install preparedness plans and policies determined by the supporters of those groups to be necessary? Furthermore, do you think such lobbying groups could do a better job informing and educating the public than the government can? Also, do you think various companies and industries would quickly jump to financially back these groups once they realized the potential profits involved? Finally, do you think many special interests groups could utilize emergency preparedness lobbying groups as a means to their own ends and be more successful in pushing their agendas (in other words abuse them)?




posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:22 PM
link   
Very good question you raise.
Plenty of government think tanks.


Maybe close to what you are thinking about?
kyem.ky.gov...



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by HillbillyHippie1
Given such disasters as Katrina, Fukushima, and now Sandy and the inability of all government agencies and their bureaucratic think tanks to deal with and learn from such events, do you think there is a need for several private and public emergency preparedness think tanks which can compile reports, write papers, and submit ideas to local, state, and federal government agencies?

No. We don't need more think tanks. We need more people who know how to get things done.

Do you think citizen emergency preparedness lobbying groups need to be formed to lobby legislatures to install preparedness plans and policies determined by the supporters of those groups to be necessary?

No. I think we need legislatures in place who have the brains enough to know what to do to clean up an area after a disaster strikes, without having to have a lobbying group suggest something that should be common sense.

Furthermore, do you think such lobbyinggroups could do a better job informing and educating the public than the government can?

N/A.......See above

Also, do you think various companies and industries would quickly jump to financially back these groups once they realized the potential profits involved?

Like white on rice. That's why things don't get done as quickly and effectively as they should. Too many people out to make a quick buck at the expense of others' immediate safety and needs in times of distress like this.

Finally, do you think many special interests groups could utilize emergency preparedness lobbyinggroups as a means to their own ends and be more successful in pushing their agendas (in other words abuse them)?

Could? What decade do you live in? That's what they do.

You really need to clarify where you're going with this if want other people to join in. Your train of thought with this subject isn't going to win you many friends here. People are getting sick and tired of the red tape that you're proposing.

On a side note, the words in bold came in at a 2.5% keyword density rate. At least it's a good SEO piece.

edit on 2-11-2012 by Taupin Desciple because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by kdog1982

Maybe close to what you are thinking about?
kyem.ky.gov...


That doesn't look like a think tank.

That looks like a good idea.

I don't really have a problem with most think tanks, but we've been having natural disasters in this country for a very long time now. This doesn't seem like a problem that should be hard to solve because we've had decades upon decades of practice in cleaning up communities after disasters. What exactly is it that we still need to learn that we haven't learned already?




posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by Taupin Desciple

Originally posted by kdog1982

Maybe close to what you are thinking about?
kyem.ky.gov...


That doesn't look like a think tank.

That looks like a good idea.

I don't really have a problem with most think tanks, but we've been having natural disasters in this country for a very long time now. This doesn't seem like a problem that should be hard to solve because we've had decades upon decades of practice in cleaning up communities after disasters. What exactly is it that we still need to learn that we haven't learned already?



You do realize that those natural disasters are wide spread and spotty.
Those not affected either don't know it's going on,or it is quickly forgotten.
Tornadoes,wildfires,droughts and floods.

And hurricanes.

What is lacking is a memory of past disasters.
And how to better prepare for them the next time.

But recent disasters have woken up a bunch of people I know.
Keeping extra gas,refreshing it every few months,extra food,batteries and water.

Complacency is your enemy .



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 03:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by HillbillyHippie1
Given such disasters as Katrina, Fukushima, and now Sandy and the inability of all government agencies and their bureaucratic think tanks to deal with and learn from such events, do you think there is a need for several private and public emergency preparedness think tanks which can compile reports, write papers, and submit ideas to local, state, and federal government agencies? Do you think citizen emergency preparedness lobbying groups need to be formed to lobby legislatures to install preparedness plans and policies determined by the supporters of those groups to be necessary? Furthermore, do you think such lobbying groups could do a better job informing and educating the public than the government can? Also, do you think various companies and industries would quickly jump to financially back these groups once they realized the potential profits involved? Finally, do you think many special interests groups could utilize emergency preparedness lobbying groups as a means to their own ends and be more successful in pushing their agendas (in other words abuse them)?


During the cold war, we had that. A whole slew of Civil Defense agencies across the United States that set up fallout shelters, underground bunkers, strategic food and fuel supplies, the works. Right up until 1979 when all of that emergency planning and preparation responsibility was rolled up into FEMA and most of the preparedness groups and facilities were disbanded or mothballed.

The most you could do for best results is to work independently on a local level. Maybe even get a smaller group of like-minded individuals together as a volunteer force. Stockpile food and medical supplies. Prepare to keep yourself and those around you alive. You can't save everyone.

There are no profits to be had in this. And the government would not be interested unless it were something being done by FEMA. It is why they created that organization in the first place.





new topics

top topics
 
1

log in

join