Schizophrenia diagnosed by simple eye test

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posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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I find this very interesting. The idea that Schizophrenia could be diagnosed in such an apparantly simple way, is staggering, when we consider the amount of people who have gone undiagnosed, often with disasterous consequences.

It is pretty obvious to me, that as an addition to the current methods of diagnosis of this unfortunate mental condition, this new method could be absolutely world changing in the field of psychology.




posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by truthermantwo
I for one have "schizophrenia". But I don't go acting crazy unless my voices really get loud and start making me suffer. I've experimented with ways of affecting them instantly. ive imagined volume knobs in my mind and turning them down, that only worked for a time. Ive affected my aura, which my voices said got really big. Ive even had my voices take energy out of my mind which I felt happening and they got quieter. Ive mentaly teleported chips out of my body, that worked for a time. But the voices are still there sometimes and mostly heard outside. And they seem to be more audible when im just waking up and go outside for a cig. In my experienced opinion, voices are not a dellusion, but a biologically adaptive technology or perhaps..entity? Which talks likea computer program with repeated messages, but learns and sees and hears and senses and has predictive capabilities as well. It also has multiple personalities both male and female.


What if you one day learn that all your kind of sufferers simply have the ability to tune into another nearby dimension.

Not an illness but an odd ability very annoying but not ill.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:00 PM
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The conspiracy theorists on me says what if this simple sight test is actually a test for a possible larger group that schiophrenics belong to???

In the video I just watched one poster suggested, alll parts of their brain is connected, via the outside part of the brain. Well I just read a book tha tall dyslexics have this in common with schizphrenics. Dyslexics are a part of a larger group and that are VISUAL learners.

Now what if visual learners are the group, who are the actual ones THEY are after, as this group seems to be able to use their imagination. And didn't Einstein say something about imagination. (I've forgotten exact words SO can anybody help me out?)

I have read a lot of bloggers that write about their extra sensory abilities, and they are mostly visual learners!!!

If you are a visual learner and don't have any symptoms, DON'T DO THE TEST.

BTW I have been tested for schizophrenia when I was 14, with my whole maternal family's side, as they were being tested for Gilles de la Tourettes Syndrome. We have a problem with magnesium deficiency in our diet as our ancestors were Gypsies.

I am a visual learner and a stealth dyslexic. And I can tell if a mask is inside out but not the person's face, in the video.

Just be careful.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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I've heard that 'enlightened' people have very similar eyes to schizophrenic people...they are unfocused, something like that. Enlightened is the term used by the author, Osho, who said it. Perhaps just having a certain type of realization, whatever.

I don't know if this is the same eye thing or not, but interesting possibility. That wouldn't be good...people of high levels of spiritual realization being mis-diagnosed as schizophrenic...not that that doesn't sometimes already happen, although currently it's usually bipolar, from what I've seen..



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by TheJourney
I've heard that 'enlightened' people have very similar eyes to schizophrenic people...they are unfocused, something like that. Enlightened is the term used by the author, Osho, who said it. Perhaps just having a certain type of realization, whatever.

I don't know if this is the same eye thing or not, but interesting possibility. That wouldn't be good...people of high levels of spiritual realization being mis-diagnosed as schizophrenic...not that that doesn't sometimes already happen, although currently it's usually bipolar, from what I've seen..
Prophet. i.e.
More reliant on the Third Eye, dependent on Inner Vision,
one to whom the public goes for leadership,
etc.
Moses could not abide living inside the camp once he received the Inner Sight. He had to "have his tent apart".

Although it can become an illness, schizophrenia is technically the ability to "gather inner strength" and forge ahead when no apparent fuel is present. Even according to some relatively mainstream journals, we would not have change or leaders during those changes were it not for schizophrenia.

Not everyone who tries hard is evil! Not everyone who sees danger coming is ill!
And some children see farther than any adults can -- but we age so fast, we don't have the capacity to appreciate it.


P.S. about the military blindness and colorblindness testing, there is more to the story for sure..

anyone here use non prescription glass in order to drive a car or read a book? you might belong to this group.
could be harder to visually manipulate someone like that... or less!?



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


It's the drift of introverted intuition.

Plenty of INFJ's and ENFJ's follow this "enlightened" mumbo jumbo.

You'll see plenty of highly rational people who don't believe in "enlightenment" with the same drift.

The INTJ's and ENTJ's.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


Not so long ago, and I believe still in Britain, Bi-polar is considered a type of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia just means 'split-mind'. A bipolar individual is split in an emotional sense, jumping between two polar states of mania and depression.

Bipolar also seems to be present in unusually inventive people. The tension between the two states seems to conduce to creativity.

As for what you wrote about schizophrenia. It somewhat corroborates what I wrote earlier in the thread about how a schizophrenic has a 'topsy-tervy' perception of reality. Instead of being an individual rooted in a body, which is the first person subjective perspective, the schizophrenic experiences the world from a more inclusive, objectified state. Hence, schizophrenics often 'hear peoples thoughts' when it is there own thoughts; when they think, there's a separation between the "I" that thinks, and the appearance of the thought. It's as if they are simultaneously thinking and looking down objectively upon their thoughts. This is what creates the 'paranoid' aspect of schizophrenia.

This seems to correspond to those individuals who have experienced the 'non-duality' of existence, which I think is what you refer to by 'enlightened' people.

Its a similar perspective. They aren't rooted in their "I". This creates difficulties in thinking, as anyone who has read the words of a schizophrenic can tell. It is not only jumbled, but highly disorganized. Retarded things are emphasized which a normal and healthy person wouldn't emphasize. For example, when one conducts a conversation what's emphasized is the premise of the topic discussed. From the premise one builds his argument. In the schizophrenic, something totally unrelated is emphasized. This is due to his 'perspective' of the subject being discussed.

So while there is a similarity, the schizophrenic and the enlightened person experience two sides of the 'godhead'; the former is an extremely ill person suffocating from a perspective of the world which darkens and stifles his ability to grow as an individual. The enlightened person conversely is in control of his wisdom; he is not 'overwhelmed' or disheveled by his experience of the absolute.

While feelings of holiness and peace permeate the perception of the enlightened, fear and dread permeate the being of the schizophrenic.

However, I have read of many schizophrenics who, despite not taking medication, deal with the voices with a remarkable coolness and ease. It is refreshing to see the strength and resilience of the human spirit.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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Originally posted by dontreally
So while there is a similarity, the schizophrenic and the enlightened person experience two sides of the 'godhead'; the former is an extremely ill person suffocating from a perspective of the world which darkens and stifles his ability to grow as an individual. The enlightened person conversely is in control of his wisdom; he is not 'overwhelmed' or disheveled by his experience of the absolute.

While feelings of holiness and peace permeate the perception of the enlightened, fear and dread permeate the being of the schizophrenic.

However, I have read of many schizophrenics who, despite not taking medication, deal with the voices with a remarkable coolness and ease. It is refreshing to see the strength and resilience of the human spirit.


Let me just explain a bit of my personal experience. I was diagnosed as bipolar. I haven't taken medication in forever, with no issues, so I know that it was not a true diagnosis. I actually knew it at the time, but not necessarily easy to convince others.

Anyways, I had an absolute breakthrough spiritual experience. No need to go into details, and it's not necessarily easy to explain right. Regardless, I had absolutely noone who understood even the spiritual truths I was explaining, even follow the logic, letalone the experiences I was having. Therefore, I had absolutely noone to talk to about what I was going through, or to get guidance from. When you have an experience like that with no guidance, you are very much on your own, in a completely different way of being. You know you can't look to anyone else for precedence, and so you have no standard to go by. You're just trying to figure everything out for yourself.

Anyways, my main problem is that I was overly obsessed in trying to explain to everyone what I was realizing and going through. Noone understood. This led to a diagnosis of bipolar. Over time, I learned from past 'mistakes,' and learned how to navigate that terrain better. Nonetheless, it is incredibly easy for someone who gets into that state to be mis-diagnosed as having a mental illness. From a bit of research online, it has happened to many people. Most are never able to understand what happened, though, and just take meds for the rest of their lives. I'm glad I was able to figure things out on my own.

So, my experience was incredibly blissful. Those states are the greatest states I have ever experienced. It is easy for there to be mishaps, though. It would be much better if the mental health specialists had true knowledge and appreciation of these things. Would help prevent a lot of problems, and stop people from taking meds who don't need them.
edit on 2-11-2012 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:55 PM
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P.S. guys, some people (including perhaps Carl Jung) attributed schizophrenia and the like to a deficiency of B vitamins. this is worse in whites and can run along with A and D deficiency and everything else.

visual deficiencies would be TYPICAL of a vitamin deficiency.
ie autism symptom/one of the reasons for the dis-synchrony
the teeth could express this too.

HRM... not so elementary, but hopefully sensible?
edit on 2-11-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by TheJourney
I've heard that 'enlightened' people have very similar eyes to schizophrenic people...they are unfocused, something like that. Enlightened is the term used by the author, Osho, who said it. Perhaps just having a certain type of realization, whatever.

I don't know if this is the same eye thing or not, but interesting possibility. That wouldn't be good...people of high levels of spiritual realization being mis-diagnosed as schizophrenic...not that that doesn't sometimes already happen, although currently it's usually bipolar, from what I've seen..


Enlightened people are not tormented by their own thoughts and highly paranoid. Not that that is always the case with schizophrenics but it is common among them.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by ErroneousDylan

Originally posted by TheJourney
I've heard that 'enlightened' people have very similar eyes to schizophrenic people...they are unfocused, something like that. Enlightened is the term used by the author, Osho, who said it. Perhaps just having a certain type of realization, whatever.

I don't know if this is the same eye thing or not, but interesting possibility. That wouldn't be good...people of high levels of spiritual realization being mis-diagnosed as schizophrenic...not that that doesn't sometimes already happen, although currently it's usually bipolar, from what I've seen..


Enlightened people are not tormented by their own thoughts and highly paranoid. Not that that is always the case with schizophrenics but it is common among them.


I'm not saying schizophrenics and enlightened people are the same...just that it's possible that their eyes could be the same, and there could be a false positive with this new test.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by ErroneousDylan
 


roses are red
violets are blue
im a schizophrenic
and so am i

Nice find though mate!



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 





I'm glad I was able to figure things out on my own.


So in all this time, you never approached a priest, or rabbi, or swami, guru, etc who could help you understand the nature of your experiences?

In simple terms, was this experience what others popularly call "nonduality"?




It would be much better if the mental health specialists had true knowledge and appreciation of these things


There are two schools of psychoanalysis which acknowledge spiritual phenomena; there's the Jungian school, and logotherapy, as developed by Viktor Frankl.

I'm drawn to the latter as the formers mechanistic approach is a tad bothersome, and seems to drain life of meaning beyond some 'archetype' that is functioning through me.

However, I've been told that the school of psychoanalysis that Frankl developed, referred to sometimes as existential psychology, is growing in popularity amongst psychologists.

It's the mechanistic, categorized "put you in a box" tendency that takes a person like you, who had an unusual mystical experience, and says "bi-polar!".

Not only is bi-polar overly diagnosed, but so is ADHD, and ADD.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:50 PM
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Originally posted by dontreally
So in all this time, you never approached a priest, or rabbi, or swami, guru, etc who could help you understand the nature of your experiences?

In simple terms, was this experience what others popularly call "nonduality"?


Never approached a spiritual teacher in person. Just heavy amounts of reading and thinking on my own.

And yes, one aspect of my experiences would be non-duality. Plus noticing obvious correlations between what is going on inside my own mind and what is going on outside of me, and relations between things, and the way they are patterned.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 





Plus noticing obvious correlations between what is going on inside my own mind and what is going on outside of me, and relations between things, and the way they are patterned.


So symbolism? Synchronicity?

My own views of symbolism are, while it is highly fascinating and highly significant, life is more than symbolism. In fact, I would go so far as to say that symbolism, while being a source of inspiration, is a backdrop relative to the experience of the ineffable.

Besides, one cannot both live and experience, and pay attention to the symbolic relation between things. Though, I too am fascinated by the symbolism of things. I think I know what you mean also when you mentioned that something outside corresponds to the something within. Though I'm not sure if I was dreaming, or if this was something I experienced while awake. Regardless, I sense that I recognize what you're talking about.

In any case it cant be something that is constant, since even mystics have their 'ups' and 'downs' or expansive and contractive states of awareness.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by dontreally
reply to post by TheJourney
 





Plus noticing obvious correlations between what is going on inside my own mind and what is going on outside of me, and relations between things, and the way they are patterned.


So symbolism? Synchronicity?

My own views of symbolism are, while it is highly fascinating and highly significant, life is more than symbolism. In fact, I would go so far as to say that symbolism, while being a source of inspiration, is a backdrop relative to the experience of the ineffable.

Besides, one cannot both live and experience, and pay attention to the symbolic relation between things. Though, I too am fascinated by the symbolism of things. I think I know what you mean also when you mentioned that something outside corresponds to the something within. Though I'm not sure if I was dreaming, or if this was something I experienced while awake. Regardless, I sense that I recognize what you're talking about.

In any case it cant be something that is constant, since even mystics have their 'ups' and 'downs' or expansive and contractive states of awareness.


Yea, it was basically synchronicity taken to an absurd degree. Things almost constantly happening where I would think of something, and then someone or something outside of me would happen exactly related. It got where all feelings of me having to try to do something or bring something into existence was gone, because it just got obvious that things would manifest outside of me if I thought of it, so I didn't think in terms of outside of me at all.

Interesting what you say about the 'ups' and 'downs' of mystics. In my 'up' stages, I always think it is going to last forever. It seems so apparent, and right there, that I don't understand how it could ever not be the case. It just seems to be the way reality is. Every time, so far at least, I've come 'down,' though.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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Originally posted by KhufuKeplerTriangle
P.S. guys, some people (including perhaps Carl Jung) attributed schizophrenia and the like to a deficiency of B vitamins. this is worse in whites and can run along with A and D deficiency and everything else.

visual deficiencies would be TYPICAL of a vitamin deficiency.
ie autism symptom/one of the reasons for the dis-synchrony
the teeth could express this too.

HRM... not so elementary, but hopefully sensible?
edit on 2-11-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)




This is very true. the body gets locked out of taking up vitamins and minerals easily. It takes a lot of thinking and observing of symptoms to get it all straightened out. So many of the deficiency and balances of these things cause the same symptoms. It is almost a trial and error thing to straighten it out.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 





ecause it just got obvious that things would manifest outside of me if I thought of it, so I didn't think in terms of outside of me at all.


That's bizarre.

It's not that I don't believe you or anything, but it does seem to abnormal. It was as if your mind was entrained to a 'future tense' state of things; your mind would think and reality would follow.

An interesting example of this from my own experience was when I dealt with hypochondria when I was younger. Ironic to say now, but I used to be deathly afraid of schizophrenia. I recall on some days when my anxiety was so great that EVERY OTHER THING I looked at seemed to bring me to the word schizophrenia. It was unnatural, and frankly it didn't seem normal to come by a word like that so often. I would scroll the internet and I would be 'led', it seemed, to the word. It would 2 am, I'm watching TV, and all of a sudden I pass by the news, leave it there for a second, and a story comes up about schizophrenia! And I also have examples of this with parkisons disease (another fear I used to have) and cancer.

There is obviously some deep fundamental relationship between emotion and the external world of our experience; as if the latter is predicated and a corollary of the former. If some very energized unconscious content becomes active within the personality, it leads the thoughts towards things associated with that content.

I imagine something similar was occurring with you; but instead of being a fear or phobia leading you, it was something else.




It seems so apparent, and right there, that I don't understand how it could ever not be the case. It just seems to be the way reality is. Every time, so far at least, I've come 'down,' though.


I think that's apart of the natural state of things; inhalation and exhalation, coming close and coming back; the infinity of the godhead, and the limitation of the world we live in.

Frankly, I think it's perfect this way. We get to bring our insights from such states into the real life terms of living, family, love (which is always preferential, i.e. for a mother, father or a particular woman, or your children) etc.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


Interesting comment about the the psychologist going crazy. The people I've met that are the most interested in psychology have tended to be the ones that seemed the most "off". That seems to fit the general pattern, unfortunately.

I did see something on Dr Phil last week though that blew me away. Some researchers have found that they can use magnetic stimulation to essentially reprogram parts of the brain that are not functioning normally. Pretty cool stuff, and possibly they will figure out how to use it to help this condition too.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 01:24 AM
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This is actually really interesting and useful, in my opinion.

Sure, it's not a sure-fire of diagnosing someone, but it could be used as an initial test. So if the eye test pointed towards schizophrenia, doctors would have a better idea of how to diagnose them. It would be important to be evaluated past the eye test, even if the eye test didn't point in that direction.

I would like to know how they determined the 98% success rate, though... And I wonder how this relates to certain types of schizophrenia. Interesting.





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