Undercover pigeon carrying WW2 secrets found

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posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by GPegel
 



AOAKN HVPKD FNFJU YIDDC
RQXDR DJHFP GOVFN MIAPX
PABUZ WYYNP CMPNW HJRZH.
NLXKG MEMEK ONOIB AREEQ
UAOTA. RBQRH DJOFM TPZEH
LKXEH RGGHT JRZCQ FNKTQ
KLDTS GQIRU AOAKN


This one, not the one about Hitler's testicles.


I guess five-letter code words are pretty common. It didn't really shout cipher anyway.


By 1894, the dictionaries and the signal books had been combined, and in 1913 there wasa section in the General Signal Book providing five-letter code groups that were used forsecret communications until the Navy "A-Code" was constructed by the Code and SignalSection.



German Clandestine Activities




posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 10:46 AM
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Err! Its a British code.I dont think they would be using a German code.....The "words" are all in blocks of five letters to make it harder to crack..else you could look up all 2 letter words , and 3 letter words etc to crack the code..the5 letter sections are not 5 letter words.

To crack the code from an agents book of one time codes , you would need the key.It is quite possible/probable even ,that it is unbreakable.
edit on 2-11-2012 by gambon because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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Originally posted by gambon


Err! Its a British code.I dont think they would be using a German code.....The "words" are all in blocks of five letters to make it harder to crack..else you could look up all 2 letter words , and 3 letter words etc to crack the code..the5 letter sections are not 5 letter words.

To crack the code from an agents book of one time codes , you would need the key.It is quite possible/probable even ,that it is unbreakable.


How silly of me... My link referenced U.S. Navy code however, not German code.

I was not under the assumption that the five letter sections meant five letter words, more approving the idea of brettcal82's post.


Originally posted by brettcal82
www.otr.com...
In the late 19th and earlier 20th Centuries, there were Code Books created because telegram messages were charged by the word. As many as ten characters in a grouping were considered a word by the telegraph companies. Commercial Code Books, such as the Acme Code Words, or the Bentley's Complete Phrase Code were available to companies, enabling them to send complex messages in only a few "words." For instance, if someone used a Bentley's, he or she might choose the following letter groupings:

DIZUH (contracts for)
DAELF (computing)
FEAVO (equipment)
RUGUB (has/have been signed)
KUKIB (New York)
CUGYA (commence)
OKGAP (production)
ICSCO (immediately).


Someone has said that this was posted in article back in August (yet I can't find it) but that would mean it is taking a long time to crack; you may be right, perhaps it's unbreakable.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Contracts for computer equipment {from} New York have been signed, commence production immediately.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Someone at another source has said that it was common in WWII that a message would start and end with the sender's call-sign. However, AOAKN comes up nowhere online


Sick of pigeons.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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how the code could be broken

www.feldgrau.com...



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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It probably says "Put the Kettle on, I'll be home in a bit"



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 


I knew it wouldn't take long for them to break the code. Can you believe that they have been doing this since WW 2.

CODE BROKEN



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by VeniVidi
 


i officially hate you!



looking forward to seeing what the message may contain



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Hee hee see thats what they are when they take the arm (wing?) bands off then they are undercover. LOL. Looking just like the pigeon that poops on the local statuary.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by VeniVidi
 


Link contained bobcat:

Would not click again.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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so it still hasn't been broken yet? wtf? imagine if this was actually received during the war and it took this long to decipher lol

i thought cyptologists would have had to study ww2 style decoding in thiere studies.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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.According to Colin Hill, the curator of Bletchley Park's permanent 'Pigeons at War' exhibition, it is unusual for such a message to need deciphering

'We have more than 30 messages from WWII carrier pigeons in our exhibition, but not one is in code,' he told Small World News Service.

'The message Mr Martin found must be highly top secret.

'The aluminium ring found on the bird’s leg tells us it was born in 1940 and we know it’s an Allied Forces pigeon because of the red capsule it was carrying – but that’s all we know,' he concluded.

It is thought that the bird and its message date back to the D-Day invasions of 1944, during which the Allied Forces used homing pigeons to communicate with generals in England
.

Read more: www.metro.co.uk...



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by rayuki
so it still hasn't been broken yet? wtf? imagine if this was actually received during the war and it took this long to decipher lol

i thought cyptologists would have had to study ww2 style decoding in thiere studies.


If it is a encoded using a one time pad then yes it might be unbreakable.

en.wikipedia.org...

For example Cuban Intelligence transmit coded messages on radio High Frequency using a one time pad system. Using a one time pad system the message are unbreakable. Many intelligence services use such a system. In the case of Cuban spy Ana Montes she failed to follow strict instructions and procedures regarding one time pads and when arrested the messages were compromised.

www.fas.org...

www.fbi.gov...



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by VeniVidi
 


It's been so long since I was last rick-rolled. It's nice to know he still hasn't given me up.

lol



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh
reply to post by detachedindividual
 


well wouldnt the code be published somewhere.....by now.

the birds only return home.....so this is a message returning from the front lines....
they were carried by airmen....so this could be coordinates for a target..or news about a target

but i do think that we can break it....someone somewhere would of discussed it...(online/published).we can then pick up the residual elements...then use our communal ATS brain...to come up with some ideas

also...the pigeon handlers THEMSELVES are still alive
www.454-459squadrons.org.au...
edit on 2-11-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)


Codes were not static in many cases. There were mathematical equations used to alter a code from one month to the next. There are potentially hundreds of thousands of varying codes that might have been used for each specific region.

Even now, information is divided between groups so that no one department knows the whole picture. For instance, imagine a defence company builds a plane... one department will know how two components piece together, but they won't know what those components attach to. One person might have a blueprint for a specific part, but they won't know where in the plane it connects.

The same applies to intel and code breaking. You don't have everything going back to one group of people, able to be deciphered by everyone. If one spy was present they could leak everything to the enemy and destroy your entire intelligence network.

You have it divided, so someone working at Bletchley Park leaking something wouldn't mean the enemy has the key to decode every message leaving France, Spain, Germany, Russia...

Some of the brightest mathematicians were involved in code, and as far as I'm aware we don't have any genius mathematicians on ATS. Even if we did, there are far too many variables which would make a code specific to the group reading it.

A good example of this is the most basic coding of all. See if you can decipher this.

1, 34, 23,
43, 42, 5,
46, 32, 7,

You won't be able to, but it's the simplest method of coding a message.

I'll tell you why you couldn't break that, because it refers to the pages, lines and words of a specific book that only me and the intended recipient would have. There are millions of books in the world, pick one and use that between you and as long as no one else knows which book you are using the code is indecipherable.
edit on 2-11-2012 by detachedindividual because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 


Must code breakers "frantically" try to break said code? I think it can probably wait a week. The subtle distinctions of urgent and interesting...



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 12:22 AM
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I don't understand why people are saying they need to "break" the code.

The message was intended for the British Military, ergo, the military know how to decode it. Otherwise, what would be the point of anyone sending classified informations via carrier pigeon, if we couldn't decode it?

Unless ofc, they lost the decryption manuals (very doubtful).



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by BMorris
 


My thoughts exactly, mate.



posted on Nov, 3 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by BMorris
 


Any keying material, cryptographic material, any of that stuff used by our present day military is destroyed after it is used. In fact, two people have to witness it and sign for it. None of that stuff is saved.

As long as we are talking crypto, has anyone ever heard of the famous WOM chip, known as the write only memory, for high security stuff... WOM Chip here

I doubt anyone alive has the ability to translate that thing.
edit on 3-11-2012 by kawika because: added link



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