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If the Universe is expanding.... then is time speeding up?

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posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:45 AM
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Sorry my knowledge of Science is very limited but sometimes we all like to ponder.
As we get older we all us oldies all agree the years are getting shorter.
They say the Universe instead of expanding progressively slower it is actually expanding quicker every second?
My question is could time be measurably be moving quicker also?
I have been watching the "known universe " documentarys on TV ..and find it all intriguing..would love to learn more... on the dark matter theory ect ..I know there's plenty out there on the net to study but just wanted to throw
this question out there.
Its probably been covered even in the show I watched but my memory is fading..and find it interesting what others know that I do not espescially on space related subjects.
Cheers




posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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Hm, not exactly positive of what you're asking but i'll give it a quick go, this will be relatively short. But, no. Expanding doesn't mean something else has to occur, EX: Time speeding up, or anything else you can think of/see theories of. It just means the this would we live in is getting bigger and bigger, and it always will be, it's infinite really, would that mean that time will speed up infinitely?

My not so educated response, don't make fun, it makes sense to me, but I have little understand of the topic myself



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by Dr Expired
 


Dear Dr Expired,

Hello again. Time is such an intriguing concept. Einstein said it was the movement of matter through space. I would postulate that it is the changing of emotions and thoughts that give the perspective of change and therefore time. A psychological experience of time rather than a physical one. In my concept time can speed up or slow down and you control the gas pedal as you learn and evolve.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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while i am not very experienced in any kind of physics, I believe that time as we know it is perceived from our orbit around the sun. if the universe is expanding, i would think that would have no effect. if the sun and earth were pulled farther apart, that would probally increase our orbit and slow time down. i am not sure , but thats my final answer
edit on 11/1/2012 by IsawWHATtheyDID because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/1/2012 by IsawWHATtheyDID because: me no spell good



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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I am in no way qualified to even give a decent answer, but I would think that if the universe is getting bigger, and our observable space is getting larger, that it would make time slow down,

If i had a 1 sqft space and shot a laser beam from one side to the other, measured the time it took to get to the other side, then expanded that sqft to maybe 2 sqft I would think the time it took the beam to get from one side to the other would increase rather then decrease? But I guess that is how you define the concept of time itself.

As I said i am no way qualified to even speculate on this.. but given my limited knowledge in that area it's the best i could do..



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:59 AM
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reply to post by Dr Expired
 


Universal expansion is a metric expansion of space, not time. Time appearing to speed up as you get older is a psychological effect, not a physical one.
Even if time were being affected by universal expansion, we would be unable to detect it, as we exist within that affected time.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by IsawWHATtheyDID
 


The Earth's orbit around the Sun is one of many things used to divide time into definable periods. The actual rate of the passage of time has nothing to do with the Earth's orbit.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by Dr Expired
 


Universal expansion is a metric expansion of space, not time. Time appearing to speed up as you get older is a psychological effect, not a physical one.
Even if time were being affected by universal expansion, we would be unable to detect it, as we exist within that affected time.



I think that this can pretty much sum up the topic, the way I personally see it, time is only a construct of our modern age and would have no "Real" bearing on the rest of the universe, time is only a measurement not really a guideline for the universe to abide by.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Time is relative.

For us humans, who used to use the Sun as a clock, a second was 60 parts of a minute, which was 60 parts of an hour, which was 24 parts of a day, etc.

Since 1967, the second has been defined to be: the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom.

Basically, we now have an atom that can keep time for us.





For beings in another part of the universe, they may have a 15 hour day, relative to ours.





Time is all in the eye of the beholder.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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reply to post by GR1ill3d
 


Would you consider distance to be merely a construct of our modern age with no real bearing on the rest of the universe?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to post by Unrealised
 


That's not time, that's the division of time. It's an important difference.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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Sat in my lougeroom passing time ..like you do when life is pressing in.
The wall clock stopped ...when? I do not know.
thought it was 2 pm it was really 4pm how would I know?
Just sitting passsing time?
Wife comes home looks at clock puts a new batery in it time is now as it should be.
I sit staring at the clock...passing time once again.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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Time is relative to the observer, in all instances, at all.. well "times".

If time speeds up as the universe expands, we would also "speed up" and not really notice, as time is linked to the space/time we inhabit.

For example, if we were an observer observing the universe from outside space/time, we may observe time accelerating relative to "our" time in our reference frame.

However as we are observers from inside the space/time we inhabit, if time itself accelerated, we would also accelerate, so we wouldn't notice.

Think a spaceship going relativistic speeds, so fast in fact, that time began to slow for the ship and the inhabitants, relative to everyoone outside the ship.

For us they would be moving very very slowly as they approched the speed of light. For those on the ship, they would still be going the normal speed, their watches would still count one second a second inside the ship, but everyone outside the ship, travelling at regular speed, would appear to be dashing about in fast forward, with days taking only minutes or seconds to pass.

Satellites orbitting the earth, already suffer from this effect, even though they are only gooing fractions of the speed of light. Their clocks are designed with this effect in mind, it is the basis of the GPS grid.

Hope this helped, I can link data, and. Further explain this common phenomena if needs be, it is simple physics, for anyone educated in the subject. Very easily described by Einstein, in many examples. Somtimes his way of explaining complicated subjects in simple terms helps to further ones understanding.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 02:32 AM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by IsawWHATtheyDID
 


The Earth's orbit around the Sun is one of many things used to divide time into definable periods. The actual rate of the passage of time has nothing to do with the Earth's orbit.


I think you may be postulating. Even though it is apparent that time exists outside of Earth's orbit, there is currently no way in discerning whether or not Earth's orbit effects the actual flow of time within it.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:08 AM
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Time is relative, as you may have heard. We perceive time as a function of change. The movement of the sun. Seasons. Chemical reactions. Plant growth. Clocks, speedometers, radioactive decay....... time in a waiting room goes slower. Time before something you dread behaves differently. As we are made of the same stuff as the materials we use to measure the passage of time, we won't be able to notice a difference. We only note what we can observe and we are puny. What we can see at long distance, such as other stars, distant planets, are only ghosts of the real items as they are no longer what is perceived and they were only emanations to begin with. Light reflected off a surface. X-rays, radio waves, and other parts and pieces of the electromagnetic spectrum. They are not at the same age nor the same location nor in the same condition. If time changes, we won't know it.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:39 AM
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"Things" in space are not expanding; what IS expanding is the nothingness of space itself -- i.e., the space between the "things" in our universe.

The time it takes for those things (particles of matter, energy, etc) to propagate a set distance through that empty space has not changed, but that empty space is getting bigger.


edit on 11/1/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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reply to post by onthedownlow
 


Relative to the Sun (and all other non-terrestrial objects...even at different altitudes within the Earth's own gravitational potential), the Earth's orbital velocity and gravitational potential both alter the rate of the passage of time as experienced by Earth-bound observers. This has been experimentally confirmed and is entirely due to relativistic effects.

This didn't seem to be what you were talking about.
edit on 1-11-2012 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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I would also add not to forget that time also slows down the faster you go. This has been experimentaly proven with the use of Concord and an atomic clock. So, yes, time is all relative on where you are and how fast you are going.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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I really don't know if there is a corrolation between time speeding up and the universe's expansion. But a couple of years ago I heard about this theory.


“Time is actually speeding up (or collapsing). For thousands of years the Schumann Resonance or pulse (heartbeat) of Earth has been 7.83 cycles per second, The military have used this as a very reliable reference. However, since 1980 this resonance has been slowly rising. It is now over 12 cycles per second! This mean there is the equalivant of less than 16 hours per day instead of the old 24 hours. “


Click here to read

I have not yet checked out if there is any info on ATS about this, so if there is please don't blas me. Will check it out later when I come back from picking up kids from school.

What do you think about this theory? Any input?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by UnlimitedSky
 


The Schumann Resonance is not speeding up. It is actually multiple resonances at frequencies of 7.8, 14, 20, 26, 33, 39, and 45 Hz, 7.8 being the fundamental frequency.
The Schumann Resonance is, for the most part, caused by lightning strikes sending photons oscillating around the planet. It's not a physical vibration (as sites like the one you linked like to claim)...it's an entirely electromagnetic phenomenon.
So, why is 7.8 the fundamental frequency? Because that's how long it takes those oscillating photons to encircle the planet one time. In order for that to change, the speed of light has to change and/or the size of the Earth has to change. Neither of those is happening.



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