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Hurricane Sandy - the Stats are In!

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posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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I was curious about just how much rain and snow fell during Sandy and came across the statistics which I figured many others here would be curious to know. Well here they are:


HIGHEST RAINFALL TOTALS BY STATE:
Andrews AFB, Md.: 15.3" (unconfirmed)
Easton, Md.: 12.55"
Wildwood Crest, N.J.: 11.67"

HIGHEST WIND GUSTS BY STATE
Eatons Neck, N.Y.:94 mph
Montclair, N.J.: 88 mph
Westerly, R.I.: 86 mph

HIGHEST SNOW AMOUNTS BY STATE:
Redhouse, Md.: 29"
Clayton, W.Va.: 33.0"
Champion, Pa.: 13"

TOP WAVES:
39.67 feet 500 miles southeast of Atlantic City, N.J.
32.5 feet just outside New York Harbor entrance
21.7 feet lower Lake Michigan

TOP STORM SURGES:
The Battery, N.Y.: ~9 feet above normal
Kings Point, N.Y.: ~12.5 feet above normal
New Haven, Conn.: ~9 feet above normal



There's many more results found on the page here -
www.accuweather.com...

I don't think Sandy was hyped at all.
Not quite the end of the world but damn close if you were in the worst of it.
So now we know, for the record followers out there.

Here's some graphics for further edification:


To see the extent of the storm:

(graphic cropped)
Source: www.dailymail.co.uk...
edit on 31-10-2012 by Asktheanimals because: added pictures




posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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So basically... if this was in Florida it would be called "mild rain" or "scattered showers with some wind"



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


Well, if a foot of rain is a summer squall to you.
I'd hate to see your water bill.


Are you a dolphin by any chance?
Manatee mb?
edit on 31-10-2012 by Asktheanimals because: added comment



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 10:18 PM
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Interactive Map Provided By Google

Informative to look at.

Interesting to note, they are not listing any FEMA disaster recovery centers.
edit on 31/10/2012 by TheSparrowSings because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


I'm trying to imagine a 32.5 foot wave in New York Harbor .... all the yuppies in their hi-rises watching the storm and NO ONE captured it on film.


I was in New Jersey (Newark) just last year around this time, I can't imagine all the devastation. It's one thing to see Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana or Texas getting hit by a Hurricane because I would never, ever, ever go to any of those states. Ever. But this storm I was constantly pointing out all the places along the WV through NY seaboard I would go every other summer. Sad.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:09 AM
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I think after Sandy's level of destruction, we need to rethink how meaningful our classification system is for hurricanes.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:26 AM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by Asktheanimals
 


I'm trying to imagine a 32.5 foot wave in New York Harbor .... all the yuppies in their hi-rises watching the storm and NO ONE captured it on film.


I was in New Jersey (Newark) just last year around this time, I can't imagine all the devastation. It's one thing to see Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana or Texas getting hit by a Hurricane because I would never, ever, ever go to any of those states. Ever. But this storm I was constantly pointing out all the places along the WV through NY seaboard I would go every other summer. Sad.




i'm assuming the measurement was taken from a buoy and i doubt anyone could visually see the entrance to the harbor during the storm.

in any case the flooding is exceptional to say the least for the coastal area's. we didn't get but 3.5 inches of rain where i am and i actually got by without damage or power loss on this one.


i feel for the millions who didn't fair so well though.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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Wind hit 140 on top of Mt Washington during the storm.

Why doesnt that count?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
Wind hit 140 on top of Mt Washington during the storm.

Why doesnt that count?


Perhaps because nobody has a house up there.
Same here in Virginia - they reported that the winds on top of Mount Rogers (almost 4,000ft.) at 104 mph.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by Rockpuck
 


Come on man, you're smarter than that. Those states you mentioned are wonderful states, with lots of rich history, interesting people and sites, and they are a large part of the blue-collar backbone of our country. I'm disappointed.

reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


As for the storm, it wouldn't be a big deal in Florida, but that is because Florida doesn't have tunnels and subways, our homes aren't 300+ years old, and the people that live in our impoverished areas are mostly from the caribbean islands and are used to this kind of thing. Plus, our building codes and emergency services are geared toward mitigating this type of storm.

If a common blizzard from the NE hit Florida, we would be devastated! We don't have snow plows, our pipes are exposed, our agriculture would be ruined, people don't even own coats!

It isn't fair to compare this storm in NY to this storm in Florida. It is major devastation for the NE, and I feel for the people up there.
edit on 1-11-2012 by darkhorserider because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 

They also had record snow fall in The Great Smoky Mountains.


The snow that blanketed Mount LeConte during Superstorm Sandy set a record for the month of October, according to the National Weather Service.

The third highest peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park received 32 inches of snow this week, creating drifts as deep as 7 feet. Park officials say the previous record for October snowfall on Mount LeConte was a mere 6 inches set in 2010.
knoxnews.com

One lady that works at Mount LeConte Lodge has been blogging about the snow and conditions.

She posted this photo this morning:

CREDIT: www.highonleconte.com



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 

One other list of stats I think some are over looking is the pressure readings. I think that has a lot to do with the amount of destruction that we are seeing.

From your link:

RECORD LOWEST PRESSURE (ON LAND):
Atlantic City, N.J.: 948.3 mb (28.00" Hg)
Philadelphia, Pa.: 953mb (28.23" Hg)
Harrisburg, Pa.: 963mb (28.46" Hg)
Scranton, Pa.: 971mb (28.69" Hg)
Trenton, N.J.: 958mb (28.31" Hg)
Baltimore, Md.: 965mb (28.49" Hg)
Harrisburg, Pa.: 964mb (28.46" Hb)


For perspective, here are the normal pressure readings for hurricanes (from this link.)

Cat 2: 979-965mb
Cat 3: 964-945mb



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


What would you think of 30 inches of snow in Florida?
edit on 1-11-2012 by hououinkyouma because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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Those areas should start working on dealing with storms and hurricanes like this in the future, as global warming increases the possibility that the North East will see more of these regularly.




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