Voyager 1 Detects Weirdness At Solar System Edge

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posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


I mean, is there not a chance that our proximity to the centre of our solar system, our position, within the shell of the termination shock, and indeed the heliosphere, makes us somewhat unprepared for making informed assumptions about the fine detail of what may occur at the transition points between the various layers of radiation, cosmic rays that surround our system.

That's sort of the point of going out there. Isn't it?
Learning. Like learning that the bowshock doesn't exist. And we didn't have to get out there to find that out.
www.sciencedaily.com...




posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Which is sort of what I was getting at. It seems silly for science to express suprise when there was garunteed to be some utterly improbable crap happening at the edges of our solar system! Dont get me wrong, I am more than understanding of the fact that the very reason we sent the probe in the first place, was to learn these things. What I do not understand, is the way the results are recieved by the scientific community.

If I had the grades to go to university, I would hope I wouldnt have the sheer audacity to act suprised when learning something new! In the same way, how can the people who monitor these projects, with the intent of learning from them, then why in the name of Dirac would they act all suprised when they discover gaps in thier logic and therefore thier theories? If we thought we bloody well knew it all, then why send the damned thing in the first place?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


It seems silly for science to express suprise when there was garunteed to be some utterly improbable crap happening at the edges of our solar system!

I don't really see science expressing surprise, it's more of a, "huh, look at that."

But what's wrong with that? Scientists tend to get excited about "surprises". It's their job. They thought there was a bowshock. There isn't. Surprise! Now...let's figure out why not! They expected a decrease in high energy particles at the heliopause. There was an increase. Surprise! Now...let's figure out why. The more surprises the better.

It seems like you're falling into the meme that "scientists think they know everything". It ain't like that. Some scientists are pretty sure they're right about some things. Other scientists love it when those guys are shown to be wrong and a lot of those guys who are shown to be wrong love it too. I've known a few. That's really how they are.
edit on 11/1/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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Interesting, I've always found entering deep space the most interesting about all the space exploration. It would be nice if it could take pictures from whereever it is, even a picture back at the now distant solar system.

I wouldn't say it would take millions, the distance passed beyond the solar system is heck of a move, in a hundred years it may be flying in some other system with planets. Is there a concrete path or direction Voyager 1 is going?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:48 PM
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There is no increase, look at the two graphs.

The first one shows a nominal increase in highly energetic particles > 70 MeV, barely measurable. Look at the scale. A barely noticeable increase of 0.4 particles / sec.

The second graph shows almost all of the particles > 0.5 MeV ( Thus including the ones above ) and it has dropped to almost zero.

Saying there is a surprising increase is simply exaggerated, about like emptying a coin purse and there is a dollar remaining but no quarters and saying there is a sudden increase in dollars in your purse.

There could be a number of reasons for this level of higher energetic particles, maybe they concentrate in this particular region, or they are remnants of a massive solar eruption months ago, or they are part the "ether" that does connect the solar systems as proposed by the Electric Universe theory.
edit on 1-11-2012 by H1ght3chHippie because: typ0s x2



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


A Legit Reason ......


Ribbon at Edge of Our Solar System: Will the Sun Enter a Million-Degree Cloud of Interstellar Gas?
ScienceDaily (May 24, 2010) — Is the Sun going to enter a million-degree galactic cloud of interstellar gas soon?


www.sciencedaily.com...


NASA: our solar system passing into INTERSTELLAR CLOUD that 'should not exist', may collide
www.abovetopsecret.com...


in 2008

Space / StarsHow a Cloud of Space Dust Could Wipe Out Life on Earth
Seemingly innocuous specks could throw off the whole solar system—and we might not see them until it's too late.

by Jeffrey Winters
From the Whole Universe special issue; published online December 30, 2008
discovermagazine.com...:int=1&-C=



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by Imtor
Interesting, I've always found entering deep space the most interesting about all the space exploration. It would be nice if it could take pictures from whereever it is, even a picture back at the now distant solar system.

I wouldn't say it would take millions, the distance passed beyond the solar system is heck of a move, in a hundred years it may be flying in some other system with planets. Is there a concrete path or direction Voyager 1 is going?


Here you go:


Voyager 1 is not heading towards any particular star, but in about 40,000 years it will pass within 1.6 light years of the star Gliese 445, which is at present in the constellation Camelopardalis. That star is generally moving towards our Solar System at about 119 km/s (430,000 km/h; 270,000 mph).[33]


Voyager 1 Current Status

Gliese 445 is 17.6 light years away.
edit on 1-11-2012 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
What I do not understand is why the scientists are so confused by increases in activity. To me it makes perfect sense For example, when you grab one magnet in your right hand, and one in your left, and push the two north poles together. You will feel the resistance these objects have toward eachother, and although it is invisible to the naked eye, you know that there is force being exerted by these objects, that keeps them from touching. You do not for one moment imagine that there is a place between these forces, which is empty of all interaction, and indeed it is not logical to assume that there ought to be.



i think that is what happens as we get closer to the edge. Voyager will be pushed right back to us. This solar system is ours and we will be here until our end.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:22 PM
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Firstly..."according to theory..."

Secondly, we teach people fact based on theory and then we wonder why we discover things are different than we thought later on.

Why can't people admit theory is theory instead of purporting it to be fact to make them look more intelligent than they really are?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 09:45 PM
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very interesting find. I wonder what other information will come out on this.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by Josephus
 


I say it hits the shell of a giant turtle that the universe is riding on, lol. Well as for Dec. 21 or so I wonder if we do breach in to interstellar space if we receive a signal we either want to hear or don't want to hear, lol. Exciting times. Lets hope we don't piss off the turtle.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 03:39 AM
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reply to post by pacifier2012
 


Scientific Theory is actually stronger than what we call facts. Scientific Theory is a hypothesis (educated guess) that has been tested, data collected, reviewed, pulled apart, verified, and continues to get tested forever, if the hypothesis doesn't line up with the data then it is changed or even scrapped. A fact is just a statement of what we believe to be true, however it doesn't go through the testing and verification that a Scientific Theory goes through.

Look up the definitions of a Fact and a Theory. Is history fact? Actually history is written by the victors so indeed it's not fact it's one side of a story.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 04:38 AM
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I don't know why, but I have this weird thought.
-----
Nasa: Voyager will be breaking the heliopause in 5....4.....3.....2.....1.....
Voyager 1: *doink*
17hrs later.
Nasa: Ummm, voyager 1 has run into some unexpected results today. It would appear our solar system is a giant snow globe of sorts.... The heliopause is a giant bubble...
-------
From here it can go a number of ways.

______

God: Ha ha, you fools. I created your world, and you challenge my greatness!!!
*appocolypse*

Or it could also go like this.

*huge swarms of UFO's land on Earth*
Alien 1" Excuse me, earthling. Tell me, what was it like to be a star on The Intergalactic Entertainment Network"
*Alien Paparazi, and reporters the world over knock on every man woman and child's doors*
All the world leaders, and "Celebrities" disrobe their flesh suits, and reveal they were all highly payed intergalactic actors.

Universe's greatest reality show. "Earth"

Or we will find out we're all part of a giant simulation that was never programmed for Man, or any of it's creations to leave the heliosphere. At which point, the system could crash, restart, or who knows for that matter. Maybe we will all wake up tomorrow to the blue screen of death.

In all seriousness though, this is truly exciting. I simply hope once they pass the heliopause we don't lose contact with Voyager due to currently unknown disturbances. I'm sure there are sound theories as to what will happen, but what if the conditions in, or outside the heliopause disrupt the signal, or damage sensitive instruments. It's a valid thought is it not?
edit on 2-11-2012 by Hijinx because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 04:41 AM
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Originally posted by Fakshon
reply to post by pacifier2012
 


Scientific Theory is actually stronger than what we call facts. Scientific Theory is a hypothesis (educated guess) that has been tested, data collected, reviewed, pulled apart, verified, and continues to get tested forever, if the hypothesis doesn't line up with the data then it is changed or even scrapped. A fact is just a statement of what we believe to be true, however it doesn't go through the testing and verification that a Scientific Theory goes through.

Look up the definitions of a Fact and a Theory. Is history fact? Actually history is written by the victors so indeed it's not fact it's one side of a story.


fact/fakt/
Noun:

A thing that is indisputably the case.
Information used as evidence or as part of a report

the·o·ry/ˈTHēərē/
Noun:

A supposition or a system of ideas intended to explain something, esp. one based on general principles independent of the thing to be...: "Darwin's theory of evolution"
A set of principles on which the practice of an activity is based: "a theory of education"; "music theory".

sup·po·si·tion/ˌsəpəˈziSHən/
Noun:
An uncertain belief.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm...... I think you have them backwards mate.

Seems facts are indisputable, and a theory is an uncertain belief of ideas....


Oh, and History, ( His story) is one side of the events that took place. There are always different accounts as to what happened, even in the history books. The issue is commonly in history the victor get's to tell the tale, and unfortunately a lot of things are not told. There are facts in history, how ever there are also theories, and much of history isn't available so it's educated guesses. Look at any "current" wars, you're not told everything now, you won't find out for many years to come, or not at all. Then someone will look for evidence to piece together what did happen.

edit on 2-11-2012 by Hijinx because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 05:46 AM
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Just a quick question that possibley can't be answered.

Just imagine if Voyager had an infinite power source. It set off from Earth and travelled through space in a Northerly direction. Would it keep on going and going and going never to be seen again.

Or would it eventually come back to Earth after billions of years arriving at the Southern end?

Answers on a post card please.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
Can't help but wonder without the gravity well of a nearby star, if voyager's molecules would disintegrate and it dissipate into nothingness?


If anything, I wouldn't be surprised if it's speed accelerated.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:29 AM
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In a thread here long ago, probably in the archives I speculated that once we leave our gravity well we may find that general realativity and the physics we understand will be much different without a huge gravity well effecting everything. My hope was that once we leave the Solar system that travel would be much faster oening the door to travel between the Stars. One way to look at my speculation would be that all space outside large gravity wells is simiar to what they expect to find inside worm holes. In other words a space craft leaving our suns gravity well will be able to travel close to light speed if not faster. All light we have studied is under the effects of our gravity well. We have never tested physics outside of a massive gravity well. There is no telling what we may discover. I hope it opens the universe up for us.

Imagine a week long trip to Alpha centauri but it take 12 more months to reach it's inner planets due to the gravity well of that Sun. Still by far something we could do.


Here is my old speculation post about this from 2010 one of many I posted about this I think over the years.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 2-11-2012 by Xeven because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


hmm i don't know much about this topic but i will try to study up on this to gain an understanding on this topic . i love learning new things !



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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reply to post by AlexIR
 


Unfortunately.... as the Voyager's travel further away from earth their nuclear energy reactors are losing power... which is the original reason why the camera's were switched off... coupled with the fact that when they actually left our solar system there wasn't really anything else to take pictures of, unless you like pictures of dots of light... so the camera's were the first items of equipment to be turned off....

Now they are having to turn off one instrument after another to conserve enough energy to actually get the signal back to earth.... a signal which now is equivalent to less than half a watt of power! Amazing how we pick up that weak signal from billions of miles away isn't it!!

So, the vessels can continue to travel and relay information, but with decreasing levels of detail due to less instruments operating....

PA



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by Loki1LouAmardd2Revan3
 


The BBC showed a marvelous program a couple of weeks ago about the Voyager missions... it took you through the complete mission, from conception to present day, including all the amazing discoveries and photos from the early days... excellent program... watch if you can!

Available on BBC Iplayer...

www.bbc.co.uk...

Goes into wonderful detail....

Enjoy.

PA





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