Voyager 1 Detects Weirdness At Solar System Edge

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posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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I am surprised that Voyager 1 can still send back data that deep into space. Our technology is really pushing it`s limits this time. If it does enter interstellar space, and is able to send back data and maybe a picture, I am sure we will find something amazing. Maybe it will show us another solar system with plants...or maybe we will have our first contact with other life forms. Those things are highly unlikely, at best I hope to see data which tells us a little about the nature of interstellar space. We may learn a little about what kind of spacecraft we would have to build to survive that deep into space and also be able to support human life.




posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by freedomwv
 

It's going to be a very, very long time before Voyager encounters another planetary system. Millions of years, if ever.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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This is so exciting... I am really anxious to know what, if anything, may happen when it crosses over.

Hopefully something good will happen and the bubble wont deflate!



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by Pervius
If we've always been part of the Milky Way Galaxy our Solar System would be on the same galactic plane as the Milky Way.


Think of the violent nature by which our Sun and solar system were formed (and they formed well after the Milky Way itself formed -- or even the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy, for that matter.

Our Sun is at least a third-generation star. That means that there were at least two other generations of "ancestor" stars (probably several ancestor stars) that came before our Sun -- and provided material for our Sun and Solar system. Those several "ancestor" stars probably went through nova or supernova explosions to create the material that gave birth to our third-generation solar system.

I would think that with all of those nova and supernova explosions creating all of that dust and other materials that contributed to our relatively younger solar system, there would not be any relationshipo between the galatci plane and our solar system (even if we were always part of the Milky Way and NOT the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy -- and idea which some astronomers have questioned).



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 12:55 PM
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Wow this is such an awesome finding. I'm very excited myself. Please keep us posted of information you find! I think it's really interesting that there are "levels" so to speak surrounding our solar system. Course that could just be our way of comprehending it.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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What I do not understand is why the scientists are so confused by increases in activity. To me it makes perfect sense that there ought to be an increase in interesting particle reactions when two walls of force or energy are in conflict. Never mind the specifics of what those fields, or forces are, or the particles which make them up.

For example, when you grab one magnet in your right hand, and one in your left, and push the two north poles together. You will feel the resistance these objects have toward eachother, and although it is invisible to the naked eye, you know that there is force being exerted by these objects, that keeps them from touching. You do not for one moment imagine that there is a place between these forces, which is empty of all interaction, and indeed it is not logical to assume that there ought to be.

On some level, two massive forces pressing against one another, interact with one another. There must be exchange of force somewhere, and that could be expressed in various ways! There is no reason that I can understand, why the prevailing theory ought to be, that there is a gap of boring tedium between them. What utter madness!
edit on 1-11-2012 by TrueBrit because: edited to fix grammar issues.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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Found this simple analogy explaining "Termination Shock".


upload.wikimedia.org...

edit on 1-11-2012 by nOraKat because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by nOraKat
 


Your link seems a little lacking. It just takes you to a Wiki page called "File".



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Great thread - does anyone know what would happen to a plutonium battery if it entered the atmosphere of an alien planet. And once again was that gold plaque with we are here a good idea? Maybe one day because of voyager 1 and 2 we are all going to be in da poop



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
What I do not understand is why the scientists are so confused by increases in activity. To me it makes perfect sense that there ought to be an increase in interesting particle reactions when two walls of force or energy are in conflict. Never mind the specifics of what those fields, or forces are, or the particles which make them up.

For example, when you grab one magnet in your right hand, and one in your left, and push the two north poles together. You will feel the resistance these objects have toward eachother, and although it is invisible to the naked eye, you know that there is force being exerted by these objects, that keeps them from touching. You do not for one moment imagine that there is a place between these forces, which is empty of all interaction, and indeed it is not logical to assume that there ought to be.

On some level, two massive forces pressing against one another, interact with one another. There must be exchange of force somewhere, and that could be expressed in various ways! There is no reason that I can understand, why the prevailing theory ought to be, that there is a gap of boring tedium between them. What utter madness!
edit on 1-11-2012 by TrueBrit because: edited to fix grammar issues.


Maybe this is like something you see when you study fluid dynamics. When there are two "fluids" flowing past each other there is a bit of a dead zone that is created. You can feel something like it when you drive your car past another one going in the opposite direction. You're pushing air at 50mph in one direction and the other car is pushing air at 50mph in the other direction so that, when you pass, the air in between your cars is going 0mph and the air on either side is still going 50mph. You feel the force pressing your cars together 'cause air flows from high to low pressure and the faster air is at a higher pressure than the slower moving air.

Now this isn't really the same, but it might help you visualize how there could be an area where interstellar "air" and the suns "air" smack into each other and cancel each other out. Heck even with the magnets that you used in your example, you would find that there were places where the magnetic field of one magnet and the magnetic field of another magnet cancel out and the sum of the total magnetic fields is zero.

You can even see something like that with gravity. There are points orbiting the sun/moon system where the two gravities cancel out and you get a stable "orbit".

I'm sure there are plenty of examples (I'm also sure that some of mine aren't entirely correct).



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by andy06shake

Originally posted by Josephus
I say it's going to crash into a wall; in the vein of Jim Carrey's boat in The Truman Show. Perhaps this will happen on December 21st.
That could cause a societal shift back here at home.


Since it takes considerable amount of time for any signal from the probe to propagate back to Earth i really dont think December 21st 2012 has any relevance. 122Au is quite some ways away. Dont see the connection myself. I like your Truman Show analogy through!
edit on 31-10-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)


By my calculations, it takes about 16.5 hours for a signal to reach the probe (or from the probe to Earth).

I'm pinning my hopes on the event being a type of graduation for Humanity...not quite Star Trek Warp barrier being seen by the Vulcans kind of stuff, but along those lines.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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One of the best things about being alive today is the constant revising of what we think we know about the universe and our own origins. That, and science's new found humility, as each new discovery sends them back to the drawing board in frenzied excitement.




posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by Pervius
If we've always been part of the Milky Way Galaxy our Solar System would be on the same galactic plane as the Milky Way.

And when you look up in the night sky the Milky Way would be East-West. But it's not. We are 90* off of the Galactic plane of the Milky Way.

We are part of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy, that crashed into the Milky Way Galaxy. It's exactly 90* off of the Milky Way's galactic plane.

The 'weirdness' that Voyager 1 detected, is because of the ongoing crash going on. Of course the real scientists already know this.


We are in the same galactic plane as the Milky Way:


The galactic plane is the plane in which the majority of a disk-shaped galaxy's mass lies.


Galactic Plane

Our solar system stays within that area.

Our sun is most certainly NOT at a 90 deg angle with the Galactic Plane. The sun's axis is tilted 67.23 deg from the Galactic Plane,

Our view of the Milky Way from here a Earth does not stay in any one direction (East - West, North - South, etc). It moves about as the months go by, due to the Earth's 23.5 deg tilt.

Our sun's motion has been observed, and confirmed to be in orbit around the center of the Milky Way. If our sun had come from Sagittarius DE, this would not be the case.

There is NO cosmic law of any kind that says when a star forms in a galaxy, it's rotational axis must be parallel with the plane of the galaxy it is in. Star formation is random and chaotic, and many factors come in to make the direction of axial spin when a star forms.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by freedomwv
 

It's going to be a very, very long time before Voyager encounters another planetary system. Millions of years, if ever.


We don't know that for a fact Phage, that's just speculation. I find it amusing how people here on Earth assume that they entirely understand the distance of space. The fact is, they don't.

And let's not forget the fact that either Voyager unit could come into contact with an Alien spacecraft, and then brought back with them to whatever system they came from. ~$heopleNation



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 


We don't know that for a fact Phage, that's just speculation.
Quite a bit more than speculation. Why not read up on it?


And let's not forget the fact that either Voyager unit could come into contact with an Alien spacecraft, and then brought back with them to whatever system they came from.
Sure. And it could morph and escape and come back to destroy us and we could go back in time and capture a whale and...



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by SheopleNation
 


We don't know that for a fact Phage, that's just speculation.
Quite a bit more than speculation. Why not read up on it?


Read up on what, More reckless speculation by one species on one planet in a Universe of probably billions? LMAO! I love how you guys think that you know everything my friend.



Sure. And it could morph and escape and come back to destroy us and we could go back in time and capture a whale and...


If you're into Star Trek maybe, otherwise that was nothing but sarcastic mindless garble.

Surely you're not making a joke about the possibility of life existing out in the Universe? Why so close minded about that possibility, as well as the possibility of either Voyager making contact? ~$heopleNation

edit on 1-11-2012 by SheopleNation because: TypO



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 


Surely you're not making a joke about the possibility of life existing out in the Universe?

Nope.

And stop calling me Shirley. (I guess the joke doesn't really work in print).



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Mayson
 


I am concerned that we are applying things that we know from our close up inspections of controlled circumstances, to things that are happening, quite literally beyond the ability of mankind to observe directly. Although the very very basic movement and interaction of forces and particles is likely to be pretty much recognisable no matter where in the universe one is, I am getting the feeling, increasingly, that things may be stranger, the further from the centre of the Sol system you go.

I mean, is there not a chance that our proximity to the centre of our solar system, our position, within the shell of the termination shock, and indeed the heliosphere, makes us somewhat unprepared for making informed assumptions about the fine detail of what may occur at the transition points between the various layers of radiation, cosmic rays that surround our system.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by SheopleNation
 


Surely you're not making a joke about the possibility of life existing out in the Universe?

Nope.

And stop calling me Shirley. (I guess the joke doesn't really work in print).


Oh it works fine. That is if one has seen the movie Airplane. ~$heopleNation



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Precisely my friend.
Our observance can only be calculated from our point of view here on Earth. Anything is possible, no scientific theory is etched in stone, and we probably don't even know half of what we think that we know about this vast Universe. ~$heopleNation





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