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Why you have to love the universe

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posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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it happened to me before that when asked why you love the universe....you might not have the answer right there...and wanted to share with you my reply because I know many of you will love it...

when thinking about all those colours out there..all those marvelous huge objects and systems...all the billions of galaxies..you know the rest
....when thinking that mankind can one day travel to other systems..discover new planets with species etc...when you know that if you stop dreaming now just because you cant...no mankind will ever do that..you know you have to keep dreaming and loving the universe..one day there will be a space traveler there thanking you




posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Well for one thing. Photos like this are simply breadth taking:




And I currently have this as my wallpaper.
edit on 30-10-2012 by ssj2gohan83 because: Smaller image.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by ssj2gohan83
Well for one thing. Photos like this are simply breadth taking:




And I currently have this as my wallpaper.
edit on 30-10-2012 by ssj2gohan83 because: Smaller image.


Wow!! is that real or a composit?



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


That is indeed real.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by ssj2gohan83
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


That is indeed real.


Grabbed me the biggest one they had



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Yes its a composite


The image is a composite of separate exposures made by the WFC3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. Six filters were used to sample broad and narrow wavelength ranges. The color results from assigning different hues (colors) to each monochromatic image. In this case, the assigned colors are:

F140W (J-H) red
F657N/F665N (H-alpha) red
F814W (I) red
F606W (V) green
F438W (B) blue


Source

6 different exposures all black and white taken at different wavelengths are then colored in by a professional artist at NASA who also adds the twinkle effects to selected stars. Almost all deep field space photography is done this way. The original 'data' is nowhere near as pretty or as detailed.

edit on 30-10-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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wow this thread attracted interesting people so far

the picture posted is awesome...

is there any way we can see how the real image look like?



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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To think this is the amazingly narrow bandwidth of only the visible light spectrum of those structures.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by tkwasny
 


wow

we take many many things for granted..like the mechanism behind how wee see them at the first place

many times ...it is unreal



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by tkwasny
To think this is the amazingly narrow bandwidth of only the visible light spectrum of those structures.


No, thats not just the visible light spectrum



Six filters were used to sample broad and narrow wavelength ranges.



edit on 30-10-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)






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