Manhattan Power Plant "transformer" Flash Bears Resemblance to Fukushima Blue Glow. Discuss.

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posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:44 AM
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Wanted to share, CNN reports that a "transformer explosion" on lower Manhattan Island (NYC) (power plant?) caused a "blue and green flashing glow" seen by lots of people (and caught on film by cnn).

In Japan there was a "blue glow" reported at Fukushima... 3/11/11.


Could it be possible that a nuclear power plant has been severely affected by the huge waves generated by freakstorm Sandy and CNN is calling it a transformer explosion, or am I just silly?

"Localized Criticality" i.e. uncontrolled reaction in a power plant might emit a blue glow @.@......

fukushima,



...manhattan....



Did I miss something??

P.S. Yahoo reports also:

EXELON CRISIS


NEW YORK (Reuters) - Exelon Corp declared an "alert" at its New Jersey Oyster Creek nuclear power plant due to a record storm surge, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said, warning that a further water rise could force the country's oldest working plant to use emergency water supplies to cool spent uranium fuel rods.

The alert -- the second lowest of four NRC action levels -- came after water levels at the plant rose by more than 6.5 feet, potentially affecting the pumps that circulate water through the plant, an NRC spokesman said late on Monday.

Those pumps are not essential since the 43-year-old plant was shut for planned refueling since October 22. However, a further rise to 7 feet could submerge the service water pump motor that is used to cool the water in the spent fuel pool.


Exelon said in a statement that there was no danger to equipment and no threat to public health or safety.
The incident at Oyster Creek, which is about 60 miles east of Philadelphia on the New Jersey Coast, came as Sandy made landfall as the largest Atlantic storm ever, bringing up to 90 mile per hour (mph) winds and 13-foot storm surges in the biggest test of the industry's emergency preparedness since the Fukushima disaster in Japan a year and a half ago.
edit on 30-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)

...


...

The NRC spokesman said the company could use water from a fire suppression system to cool the pool if necessary. The used uranium rods in the pool could cause the water to boil within 25 hours without additional coolant; in an extreme scenario the rods could overheat, risking the eventual release of radiation.

edit on 30-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)



Constellation Energy Nuclear Group's 630-MW Nine Mile Point 1 nuclear power reactor in upstate New York did shut down due to a problem putting power onto the grid, although it was not clear whether the trouble was related to the storm, the NRC spokesman said.

The relatively small 636-megawatt Oyster Creek plant also experienced a "power disruption" at its switch yard, causing two backup diesel generators to kick in and maintain a stable source of power, Exelon said.

Tillman said another Exelon reactor at the Limerick facility in Pennsylvania was reduced to 91 percent power after Sandy caused a problem with the condenser.
edit on 30-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by KhufuKeplerTriangle
 


huh... interesting.. seems awfully big to be a transformer.. but hard to say in the dark of night... hmm good images.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:54 AM
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Damn. That's bright. This can't be dangerous though, right? I mean it isn't radioactive is it?

Here's some footage.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:56 AM
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doesnt every household smoke detector contain some radioactive components? (it says so on so many sticks i seen)

it's not a stretch to suspect manhattan power plants have some significant level of radioactive components that likewise can be mutagenic, toxic, or lethal if combusted or otherwise released into the air.

figures they wouldn't disclose the fact that even non-nuclear power plants still have nuke components, we're surronded by hundreds of the nuclear ones as it is.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 03:57 AM
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reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 

thanks to cnn and the japanese LOL! @.@

but the flash looked a lot alike. i have no idea what kind of power stations are out there, just a similarity of the light.

a few hours back i could not stop thinking about cherenkov radiation, by the way

eek! Isn't that strange?

There is an awful lot of trouble happening in NYC all at the same time... wtc site flooded, then this Fukushima-esque flash in the early morning..

over 50 houses on fire and no water to fight them.
water flooding into a train station and into the subways. airports in NY closed.

post-tropical cyclone
hypercane sandy
edit on 30-10-2012 by KhufuKeplerTriangle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by KhufuKeplerTriangle
 


an electrical short creates a blueish arc - blue glow explained

combustion of copper creates a green flame = green glow explained



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


Cherenkov radiation is only visible when immersed in water, so I've read.


I don't think radioactivity is a concern, anymore. When the god of science fails, we get things like 'all the radioactivity will harmlessly disperse'. This is an expert opinion, btw.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:31 AM
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Originally posted by Xaphan
Damn. That's bright. This can't be dangerous though, right? I mean it isn't radioactive is it?

Here's some footage.


Suspicious looking video. It is easy to fake such video these days,
and I wouldn't rule out the possibility in this case.

Plenty of proven fake video has come out of Japan.

I believe there is an agenda underlying sandy, the U.S. elections and nuclear power plants.

I guess the next few days will tell alot.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:37 AM
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I'm pretty sure there isn't a nuclear power plant in lower Manhattan. That's where the explosion occurred. You can tell that it was in the city itself just based on the buildings behind the explosion.


More transformer explosions:
At a house fire:


Toronto:


At a San Francisco 49ers football game:


All have the blue glow, none were nuclear or radioactive.
edit on 10/30/2012 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)
edit on 10/30/2012 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 04:41 AM
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Go on youtube and have a look for exploding transformers. There are many many videos as I found out myself because I was curious of how it looks when one explodes


The effects can be pretty weird and it can give off a crazy lightshow.

You say it looks the same as fukushima, of course it would, it probably had dozens of transformers in it's vicinity. Expect for a few local power cuts i wouldn't worry too much.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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update on nuclear power plants shut down/on alert/unusual events

By Associated Press, Published: October 29 | Updated: Tuesday, October 30, 2:32 PM

Constellation Energy Nuclear Group's 630-MW Nine Mile Point 1 nuclear power reactor in upstate New York did shut down due to a problem putting power onto the grid, although it was not clear whether the trouble was related to the storm, the NRC spokesman said.

The relatively small 636-megawatt Oyster Creek plant also experienced a "power disruption" at its switch yard, causing two backup diesel generators to kick in and maintain a stable source of power, Exelon said.

Tillman said another Exelon reactor at the Limerick facility in Pennsylvania was reduced to 91 percent power after Sandy caused a problem with the condenser.



WASHINGTON — Three commercial nuclear power reactors remained shut Tuesday in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy while another plant — the nation’s oldest — was still on alert.

Nine Mile Point Unit 1 reactor on Lake Ontario, northwest of Syracuse, N.Y., shut down automatically around 9 p.m. Monday when an electrical fault occurred on a power line used to send electricity from the plant to the grid, according to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
The second reactor at the site lost one of its incoming power lines, causing a backup generator to start. That reactor was continuing to produce electricity.

Another nuclear reactor, Indian Point’s Unit 3, about 25 miles north of New York City, was shut down Monday because of external electrical grid issues, said Entergy Corp., which operates the plant. The company said there was no risk to employees or the public, and the plant was not at risk due to water levels from the adjacent Hudson River, which reached 9 feet 8 inches before beginning to subside. Another unit at the plant continued to operate at full power.

At the Salem plant in Hancocks Bridge, N.J., near the Delaware River, the Unit 1 reactor was shut down early Tuesday because four of its six circulating water pumps were no longer available, according to PSEG Nuclear, which operates the complex. The pumps are used to condense steam on the non-nuclear side of the plant.

Another Salem unit has been offline since Oct. 14 for refueling, but the nearby Hope Creek plant remains at full power. Together, the Salem and Hope Creek plants produce enough power for about three million homes per day.

Since the condensers are unavailable at the Unit 1 reactor at the Salem plant, steam was being vented into the atmosphere. NRC spokesman Scott Burnell stressed that the steam being vented does not come into contact with radioactivity deep inside the nuclear generator, and does not pose a health threat.

The oldest U.S. nuclear power plant, New Jersey’s Oyster Creek, was already out of service for scheduled refueling. But high water levels at the facility, which sits along Barnegat Bay, prompted safety officials to declare an “unusual event” around 7 p.m. About two hours later, the situation was upgraded to an “alert,” the second-lowest in a four-tiered warning system.

The NRC, which oversees plant safety, said conditions were safe at Nine Mile Point, Indian Point, Salem, Oyster Creek and all other U.S. nuclear plants.

A rising tide, the direction of the wind and the storm’s surge combined to raise water levels in Oyster Creek’s intake structure, the NRC said. The agency said that water levels are expected to recede within hours and that the plant, which went online in 1969 and is set to close in 2019, is watertight and capable of withstanding hurricane-force winds.

The plant’s owner, Exelon Corp., said power was also disrupted in the station’s switchyard, but backup diesel generators were providing stable power, with more than two weeks of fuel on hand.

In other parts of the East Coast, nuclear plants were weathering the storm without incident.
:???:

The Indian Point nuclear power plant about 45 miles north of New York City was shut down Monday night because of external electrical grid issues. Entergy Corp., which operates the plant, said there was no risk to employees or the public.

— An "unusual event" was declared at the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Lacey Township, N.J., when waters surged to 6 feet above sea level during the evening. The reactor was offline for regular maintenance and the event was quickly upgraded to an alert, the second-lowest in a four-tiered warning system.



posted on Oct, 30 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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There are no nuclear power plants on Manhattan Island.
The closest one is Indian Point about 45 miles away.





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