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Unknown Depths of Earth....

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posted on Oct, 21 2004 @ 08:12 AM
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Originally posted by genesiss
yes but dont forget about the pyramid's off of florida's coast

What pyramids?

Disaster_boy
What are they doing out on Eurpoa anyway

I think there is more interest there becauseits extra-terrestrial and might habour life


if there has ben another moon landing where we have actually walked on the moon

I don't know myself, but I think that a lot of the funding for the moon missions and such was because of the "Space Race" and competition with the soviets. I mean, the soviets weren't supposed to be some technologically advanced country sending the victorious proletariot into space while the americans had failing schools. So there was an investment for a while. After that, interested dropped. Same with the ocean floor. There isn't a push from the gov or the public to explore it. Also, there isn't, as far as I know, a government agency dedicated to studying it, like NASA.




posted on Oct, 21 2004 @ 11:43 AM
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Thanks for all of your thoughts!

Good point Nygdan,but that begs the question as to why there isn't a govt agency dedicated to it?? most countries have a coast so isn't it a security interest to know what is actually down there?? as for a financial interest...imagine how many chemicals could be found.....maybe even oil deposits....if we can build offshore oil rigs with drill that extend for miles why not use a similar method to get probes into place?? communications cables are not as thick as drills....

I understand that the pressures are probably too much to contend with, but there are hazards equally dangerous in space. Radiation, for example, is a very serious hazard....but it has been overcome

my point about Europa is: if NASA are contemplating sending a probe there;

A) it has to get there, Jupiter isn't exactly near so theres a cost in fuel....and the hazards of space travel
B) Once its there it has to land....and then melt through 100km of Europa's surface ice.
C) Then the probe has to withstand unknown pressures from the ocean as the only life that can exist that far from the sun needs heat....found near to the moons core!!...its gonna be quite deep!!

anyway if you want more info have a look at this link:

www.solarviews.com/eng/europa.htm

If this is in the pipleline for the next few years then i am sure that the tech could be tweaked to have a look at our oceans!

The reason, I'm guessing, is that either E.T. is down there and the govt knows or E.T. is not down there and the govt know!!

If anyone can dig up info on those pyramids off Florida that would be great!! If some artefact/ruins are already known to be there, isn't that reason enough to get some minds running to find a solution as to how to get to them?



posted on Oct, 21 2004 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by Nerevar
most countries have a coast so isn't it a security interest to know what is actually down there??

Coasts yes, but the coasts are explored and monitored. The deep ocean isn't. As for why, well, I think its because the gov isn't interested in spending the money for academic purposes or for primary research. Nasa got a boost because it dealt with rocket tech, which has other applications, and because it was useful for the propaganda portion of the space race and competition with the soviets. If, instead of sputnik, they hade created a lab on the deep ocean floor, then there'd probably be a Ocean Floor Agency, and not as much of a Space Agency.


we can build offshore oil rigs with drill that extend for miles why not use a similar method to get probes into place??

Because operating an ocean oil rig is astoundingly expenseive. What would they be doing with it that isn't already done? its not like there is no research at all about the ocean floors. Google up on "ALVIN" and other deep sea vehicles for general info.




I understand that the pressures are probably too much to contend with, but there are hazards equally dangerous in space. Radiation, for example, is a very serious hazard....but it has been overcome

The ISS and Shuttle tend to stay in the confines of the protection of the earth's electromagnetic fields, as I understand it, so radiation isn't the problem it would be for a trip to mars.

Regardless, deep sea exploration and space exploration are definitly extremely difficult. The tech is up to it in both cases, I think that its the will to study the oceans that isn't there.



The reason, I'm guessing, is that either E.T. is down there and the govt knows or E.T. is not down there and the govt know!!

Doesn't stand to reason. Seems like they'd be able to study either and pick and choose what to reveal. I really think that its a matter of the governement simply not being interested in spending millions to study the oceans.


If anyone can dig up info on those pyramids off Florida that would be great!!

Are you talking about the ones that are supposed to be off the coast of cuba?



posted on Oct, 21 2004 @ 03:42 PM
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First off, there are no ETs on our ocean floors. There are some pretty alien-looking species down there:

www.pbs.org...

...But they aren't from freakin' outer space. They evolved where they are now.

Now, the floors of all four of our oceans have been topographically mapped with sonar. No cities, sorry. You can view the maps if you want at anytime.

pubs.usgs.gov...

There is nothing to find down there except new species of aquatic life. While that's awesome, most of the lifeforms are just variations of FISH, mollusks, worms, and echinoderms.

people.whitman.edu...

Now, to dispell the apparent myth, WE ARE EXPLORING THE OCEANS. We have given it the priority it deserves -- not very high. I don't know why people here have gotten the idea that we're not exploring the depths of the oceans...

The pressure at the deepest part of the ocean floor is 16,000 PSI. I'm not going to explain the basics of atmospheric pressure in this thread because you can google whatever you want to know.

To summarize,

1) No cities or large artifacts show up on maps of the ocean floor.
2) We are currently and always exploring the deepest possible ocean depths.
3) There are no lifeforms in the ocean that didn't originate here on Earth -- though I will admit some are REALLY REALLY alien looking.

Zip



posted on Oct, 21 2004 @ 04:19 PM
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There was a program on the BBC a few years back about previously unknown species in the deep depths of the Oceans. In fact it was repeated just a couple of weeks ago on cable, and I caught most of it again.

Absolutely fascinating the creatures that live down there, and this wasn't even anywhere near the bottom!

They showed huge casms that looked like giant mountain ranges, and the animals - many had bio-luminescence, it literally looked like they had a blue police siren on their head / tail / anywhere else!

Absolutely spell-binding, I would love to see whatelse they find as they go deeper



posted on Oct, 22 2004 @ 05:12 AM
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I think the last time man walked on the sea bed at a great depth was 1906 or some where in that period (give or take 10 years?) It was in a "diving bell",as others have posted-the dark depths are being explored,it costs millions and millions to mount most of these ops and the vehicles needed at these depths with the preasure involved are super special,with limited dive times-theres probably millions of new species down there but there not alien to planet earth-its a good post and im sure there will be the "odd little thing" that gets discovered from time to time that needs some explaining-but it wont be the "grey" race!



posted on Oct, 22 2004 @ 11:20 AM
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As has been said, we have been to the ocean floor. Not a lot of the floor, and not very frequently, but we have been there. The reason, as has also been said, is because of the tremendous pressures involved.

For comparison:
The pressure at the surface of the Earth, and in the ISS is 14.7 psi (pounds per square inch)
3000 feet below the ocean's surface, the pressure is about 1400 psi. That's only a tenth of the way down, and you're seeing a hundred-fold increase in pressure.
13000 feet down, the pressure is 5880 psi
20000 feet down, the pressure is 8820 psi
At the bottom of the Marianas trench, the lowest spot we know of on the ocean floor, 36,200 feet down (almost 7 miles down), the pressure is 16,200 psi, well over 1000 times what we have to support on the surface.

While there may be strange critters lurking in the depths, its physics, not conspiracy, that has kept us from finding them.



posted on Oct, 22 2004 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by VelvetSplash
There was a program on the BBC a few years back about previously unknown species in the deep depths of the Oceans. In fact it was repeated just a couple of weeks ago on cable, and I caught most of it again.

Absolutely fascinating the creatures that live down there, and this wasn't even anywhere near the bottom!

They showed huge casms that looked like giant mountain ranges, and the animals - many had bio-luminescence, it literally looked like they had a blue police siren on their head / tail / anywhere else!

Absolutely spell-binding, I would love to see whatelse they find as they go deeper


I watched this series i think i got it on DVD somewhere its excellent and very wierd.

this is the most scary looking fish i have ever seen!

Im just glad its all the way down there and not near the surface,..

Sharks i can handle but this! No chance!




posted on Oct, 22 2004 @ 01:36 PM
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the reason why we dont go too deep into the ocean like eveyrone desires is because of all the esnsity and pressure we would be enduring as we went deeper down. thats why we use cameras and other such technologies, small subs etc.

i always imagined a giant squid that is too heavy to swim because its grown to a point where its too fat to carry itself around. imagine a beast which lies at the bottom all its time and just catches lingering fish as food.


it would be bus length if not hundreds of feet long.



posted on Oct, 25 2004 @ 08:31 PM
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Originally posted by Kompaktor

Originally posted by LadyV

Originally posted by Byrd

Because it's a difficult environment... cold, dark, high pressures, poor communication ability. Most of our equipment will crush at that depth.


Yeah...but look at the obstacles to man being in space.....sorta the same thing....surely if we can manage that, we could also overcome said obstacles......I'd love to this happen! I think we would learn so much about our own history that has been buried beneath the water


I mean no insult, but it seems to me like you do not understand that space and the depths of the ocean are not the same. They are extremely opposite. In space, all you need is a sealed vehicle that can hold the crew. Communications travels as fast as it does on the ground. In the ocean, you need a vessel that can withstand the AWESOME forces that crush everything underneath it. It is undescribable how much force is pushed down on you while in the ocean.

And like Nygdan said, almost the entire ocean floor has been mapped in radar. If there was any structures, like the "Water World" in the previous reply, we would have noticed it.


If they have the ability or whatever to be that deep underwater, and for so long, and have the alien technology people are talking about, Im sure they can mask themselves from our pathetic radars.



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 01:57 AM
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The question I have is. If the pressure weight is so much stronger the deeper you go, then how are the animals that deep living then. Are you trying to tell me the life that deep in the ocean has skin that is tougher then any of our materials on subs??



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by Malkavin
Im sure they can mask themselves from our pathetic radars.

But by similiar reasoning they could mask themselves entirely, and no one would ever know that they're there. Then there still would'nt be this 'coverup' to keep them secret.

. Are you trying to tell me the life that deep in the ocean has skin that is tougher then any of our materials on subs??

They have adapted to the pressures in various ways. Are you questioning that they exist and that there is pressure there or are you trying to find out how they have specficially adapted? It is pretty impressive no?



posted on Oct, 30 2004 @ 03:19 PM
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if your house is burning down you dont run into the basement, you get out...well the sad truth is our house is burning down......think on that





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