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Magnetics?

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posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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A quick and sort of oblique question: How fast does a magnetic wave travel? Does it travel at the speed of light? Does the magnetic speed differ in a vaccum vs. other mediums?

Another thing I want to bring up, and somewhat of an extension of a previous thread I have made: could it be that the mythical "graviton" is really just a photon? Could it be that a photon is the tangible, base particle of energy, in which it exists at the intersection of the two waves of "Electromagnetism" ie: Electric wave, magnetic wave?

I was thinking about mass and what not, and the idea of the total count of photons being the "mass" with the atomic structures (atoms) acting as shells to harbor the photons.

Anyway.





posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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I'm pretty sure the Higgs Boson is what give particles their mass and is also the mystical "graviton"




posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by roughycannon
I'm pretty sure the Higgs Boson is what give particles their mass and is also the mystical "graviton"



That theory is definitely fascinating, and the research and experimentation going on at Fermi and the LHC are on the cusp, for sure.

What I don't understand is the Higg's field interacting with other differentiated particles thereby 'giving' them mass. That would imply that photons must have mass too, which also wouldn't surprise me.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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i studied magnetism some time ago and most of the info i found on it has gotten pushed out of my head, but i recall that it is 'instantaneous', thus it's 'faster' than light.
not sure if it exists as a waveform or particles, i think it actually acts like a 'link'.
this one may make your head hurt
this link may help get you started



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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When something generates a changing electric field, this change in the electric field in turn causes a change in the magnetic field. This is the "wave" that propagates through space at the same frequency as the original disturbance at the speed of light.

The speed of light and the speed of any EM "wave" differs depending on the medium it's traveling through. Visible light is just a EM wave of a certain frequency/wavelength. You can probably find a graph online of the EM wavelengths and what lengths correspond to what type of "light": X-ray, infrared, ultraviolet, different colors of visible light, etc.
edit on 25-10-2012 by Mayson because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Soloro
 


All particles have mass, in fact the discovery of the Higgs, simply proves that everything in the universe is energy, and we are working towards proof on how that energy can become atoms.

On your thoughts on magnetism, Look at wiki.

"A magnetic field may be represented by a mathematical description of the magnetic influence of electric currents and magnetic materials. The magnetic field at any given point is specified by both a direction and a magnitude (or strength); as such it is a vector field.[nb 1] The magnetic field is most commonly defined in terms of the Lorentz force it exerts on moving electric charges. There are two separate but closely related fields to which the name "magnetic field" can refer, denoted by the symbols B and H.

Magnetic fields are produced by moving electric charges and the intrinsic magnetic moments of elementary particles associated with a fundamental quantum property, their spin. In special relativity, electric and magnetic fields are two interrelated aspects of a single object, called the electromagnetic tensor; the split of this tensor into electric and magnetic fields depends on the relative velocity of the observer and charge. In quantum physics, the electromagnetic field is quantized and electromagnetic interactions result from the exchange of photons.

Magnetic fields have had many uses in ancient and modern society. The Earth produces its own magnetic field, which is important in navigation. Rotating magnetic fields are utilized in both electric motors and generators. Magnetic forces give information about the charge carriers in a material through the Hall effect. The interaction of magnetic fields in electric devices such as transformers is studied in the discipline of magnetic circuits."

That being said how fast does an electron travel around a nucleus? (pssst... The speed of light.)



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by tinhattribunal
i studied magnetism some time ago and most of the info i found on it has gotten pushed out of my head, but i recall that it is 'instantaneous', thus it's 'faster' than light.
not sure if it exists as a waveform or particles, i think it actually acts like a 'link'.
this one may make your head hurt
this link may help get you started


Now are you talking about a magnetic field, or the Point of magnetism on say a ferromagnet.

As far as I understand magnetism, the fields strength and activity, differs depending on distance from the point of magnetism.



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 03:15 AM
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Someone told me that those elemental magnets inside a magnet (if they are all directed in one direction you get stronger magnetism). He told me, that those elemental magnets are in truth atoms whose electrons are spinning in the same direction OR moving in the same direction around the nucleus I´m not sure about the last.



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 03:27 AM
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I bought some rare earth magnets off if eBay.

I thought I was going to do something with them.

The funny thing is that they are sitting on top of my fridge. I am not even using them to hang my kids school work or pics with.

I might try to work on my magnetic motor idea someday.

Sorry, a little off topic I know, but it is really late land I am not all with it at the moment.
edit on 26-10-2012 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)





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