Valve cover gasket oil leak?

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posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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I made this thread a couple weeks ago
www.abovetopsecret.com...
Mods please do not delete this thread I am making a new one because I ^ that one is dead.

I had a Valve cover gasket leak so I replaced the gasket. The leak was defiantly coming from the gasket valve cover, the rubber was so brittle. The first time I did it, I used no glue and found that it was leaking in the same spot so I resealed it with gasket silicon glue. I put the glue on the bottom half of the gasket not the top. The leak stopped but another one has formed in the back. I want to take off and try to seal it once again but I am weary because I have glued it. Before I take it off I want to make sure I have the bolts on tight enough. I was told not to tighten them to tight. I tighten them with a socket wrench until I felt heavy tension. Should I beyond that?




posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


I think you're supposed to screw them hand tight and then socket screw them one quarter turn more, but I could be mistaken. Are you sure you didn't over heat and warp something?



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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The valve cover its self may be out of true. you could check it with a strait edge across multiple points?

I would use high temp rtv silicone on the faces of the gasket put the thing together and let the rtv set an hour ish before snugging the bolts up. As said above do not tighten too far it wont seal correctly and will probably find a new spot to leak.

this is my preferred method, and im sure someone will correct me if im wrong.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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Gear head here....
RTV is great to use in areas of oil/heat. There is a tightening order on valve covers, much like tightening wheel lugs. Tighenening on opposite sides like a star pattern, it is easy to warp them. Are they Steel or Aluminum? RTV will help fill the "gaps" if that is the case. They are low torque, normally inch pounds not foot pounds My daily driver is steel valve covers and they are 72 INCH pounds...divide that by 12 and you have your foot pounds. Thats 6 ft lbs....very low. You should be able to work out the problem with the RTV. Good luck! You can shoot me a PM if you need anything I can help ya with.
Sean



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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Yes!!!! A thread I know all about.

Most modern cars have rubber gaskets. No more are the days of cork gaskets. Do the bolt holes in the gasket have a brass colored insert to prevent you from over tightening? If yes then just go about 3/4 turn or less past hand tight. If they don't then you don't want much more than hand tight.

As far as silicon goes. Its not required to install the gasket. But if it leaks why not use it. I only reccomend the black RTV silicon. The blue red and clear are junk if you ask me. Just use a thin layer on your head then another thin layer on the top of the gasket. Remember if it comes out on the outside it came out just as much on the inside.

Make sure both mating surfaces are clean. Any little piece of debris can cause a leak. Don't use a screwdriver or a chisle because these can gouge into the metal and cause a whole new set of problems.

If you need anything else don't hesitate to ask. I love working on anything with an engine.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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I agree that the valve cover might be the culprit. Do like the above poster stated and check it for true with a straight edge.

Use a new gasket with RTV and make sure the mating surfaces are CLEAN. Use brake cleaner to clean the head and valve cover.

And for sure, do NOT over tighten then bolts!!!!!!!!!!



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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i hate rubber gaskets.

use the cork.

you should never have to use rtv silicone on valve covers.

criss cross when tightening bolts, so that you tighten each one evenly.
don't crank one down then move to the next one right beside it.
move to the opposite end and opposite side of valve cover.
edit on 25-10-2012 by bjax9er because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:40 PM
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I called my local Autozone and asked them about it. The torque for the valve cover is 7-ft/lbs. I would get an inch pounds torque wrench for this as 7 pounds is on the low side of a foot pounds wrench. They also said there was no mention of a certain order but from the center out evenly is a good rule of thumb.

Also I would start at half that number. 3.5 foot pounds. Do hand tight center out then 3.5 center out and finish with 7 center out.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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I loosened the bolts up and drove my car around for a bit. After a while i started to hear a flutter at first i thought the fans just got caught in something and then i opened it up and heard it coming from the gasket. So I turned the car off and tighten them up once again but the noise still is. I can hear it when the car is in idle and while driving. I have to leave for work in 1hr and its a 30min drive. Should I be ok? I will open it tomorrow on my day off but for now I have no choice.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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If you've got oil in the engine to The full mark you may or may not make it. Every car has at least an oil pressure idiot light. Just watch it. Just drive it easy. Maybe leave 15 mins early just to be safe. And have oil with you.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity
I loosened the bolts up and drove my car around for a bit. After a while i started to hear a flutter at first i thought the fans just got caught in something and then i opened it up and heard it coming from the gasket. So I turned the car off and tighten them up once again but the noise still is. I can hear it when the car is in idle and while driving. I have to leave for work in 1hr and its a 30min drive. Should I be ok? I will open it tomorrow on my day off but for now I have no choice.

Fluttering after loosening? Do you have a proper breather vent on this? What kind of car is it? I would say safe to drive, but be aware, if it is losing a lot of oil quickly, you run the risk of running low and destroying the engine.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 09:02 PM
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Originally posted by Hr2burn

Originally posted by Infi8nity
I loosened the bolts up and drove my car around for a bit. After a while i started to hear a flutter at first i thought the fans just got caught in something and then i opened it up and heard it coming from the gasket. So I turned the car off and tighten them up once again but the noise still is. I can hear it when the car is in idle and while driving. I have to leave for work in 1hr and its a 30min drive. Should I be ok? I will open it tomorrow on my day off but for now I have no choice.

Fluttering after loosening? Do you have a proper breather vent on this? What kind of car is it? I would say safe to drive, but be aware, if it is losing a lot of oil quickly, you run the risk of running low and destroying the engine.



Its a daewoo lanos 01



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by 03Smoker
If you've got oil in the engine to The full mark you may or may not make it. Every car has at least an oil pressure idiot light. Just watch it. Just drive it easy. Maybe leave 15 mins early just to be safe. And have oil with you.


Exactly. Left for work 10min and put a extra bottle of oil in the car. On my way home the oil light came on so I added more.
Im going to tear it apart tomorrow and see if i can find out what the noise is.
I THINK it might just be air escaping. I looked at the leak while the car was on and the oil leak matched the noise. It spurted out at the same tempo. Probably going to replace the pcv as well just to be safe.



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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Originally posted by bjax9er
i hate rubber gaskets.

use the cork.

you should never have to use rtv silicone on valve covers.

criss cross when tightening bolts, so that you tighten each one evenly.
don't crank one down then move to the next one right beside it.
move to the opposite end and opposite side of valve cover.
edit on 25-10-2012 by bjax9er because: (no reason given)


exactly this ^ and dont trust anyone from autozone EVER unless you know the mechanic dont trust em most generic auto stores hire know-it-alls who know very little thats why they work at a parts store handing out parts to real mechanics. and ASE certified doesnt mean crapola unless you can get a list of previous customers.

on out of spec valve covers I would only use the black RTV or high temp silicone. the others are more permanent and harder to clean later also they harden the black stuff I use stays pliable so if it breaks off into the valve cover it wont harm anything.
edit on 10/26/2012 by -W1LL because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by 03Smoker
If you've got oil in the engine to The full mark you may or may not make it. Every car has at least an oil pressure idiot light. Just watch it. Just drive it easy. Maybe leave 15 mins early just to be safe. And have oil with you.


Exactly. Left for work 10min and put a extra bottle of oil in the car. On my way home the oil light came on so I added more.
Im going to tear it apart tomorrow and see if i can find out what the noise is.
I THINK it might just be air escaping. I looked at the leak while the car was on and the oil leak matched the noise. It spurted out at the same tempo. Probably going to replace the pcv as well just to be safe.


this could be a crank case vent or valve cover vent being clogged allowing too much pressure under the valve cover blowing out the seal.



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Its a daewoo lanos 01


I'm sorry for your loss...


only daewoo I would buy is the DR-200 but that's an Assault Rifle.



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 02:00 AM
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Well, it all depends on what engine you have. My engine of choice is the Gen1 SBC, which are notorious for this very problem. Take your valve cover of, remove all pieces of gasket and rtv from cover and head, then turn your cover upside- down, and liberally apply rtv. Set the cover in place, but DON'T tighten, yet. Let it cure overnight, then tighten it down hand tight then take the nut 1/2 turn past that. They should be snug, but don't put a lot of torque on it, just snug. it should never leak untill you have to take the cover off. This is what I've done for years.



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity
I loosened the bolts up and drove my car around for a bit. After a while i started to hear a flutter at first i thought the fans just got caught in something and then i opened it up and heard it coming from the gasket. So I turned the car off and tighten them up once again but the noise still is. I can hear it when the car is in idle and while driving. I have to leave for work in 1hr and its a 30min drive. Should I be ok? I will open it tomorrow on my day off but for now I have no choice.



The fluttering you heard was probably the PVC valve sucking air past the leak.

When dealing with valve covers, one thing is important.

A clean matting surface.

get some brake cleaner, spray on a rag and clean up the gasket sealing area.

Next use Permatex RTV silicone on the cover side. Place the gasket on the cover and let dry overnight.

Puta skim on the head side and let tack up for 30mins.

Install hand tight, 7ft lbs is not very much.

Stinky old slog isnt she?

lol good luck



posted on Dec, 25 2012 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Over tightening is the biggest reason for leaking gaskets (new gaskets).

Buy a torque wrench and tighten them to the PROPER torque and they shouldn't leak.

If your going to use RTV gasket sealer I recommend "The Right Stuff". It's pricey (about $15) but I have NEVER had it leak on anything.



posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Handle it with care to keep it clean.

• Place it on a clean work surface, preferably one that’s covered with clean rags or towels. Or, place the head inside a clean plastic bag and keep it sealed until it’s time to install the head.

• Never set a clean head on the ground or shop floor. The weight of the head can cause dirt to stick to the head and end up on the gasket.

• Clean hands are a must when installing the head gasket and head. Greasy fingers can pick up a lot of dirt that may end up on the gasket or head surface. Grease and oil can also interfere with a good seal, so keep the gasket as well as the head and block surfaces as clean and dry as possible during gasket installation. rubber-sales.com...





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