Photography faster than the speed of light.

page: 1
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:13 PM
link   
Femto-Photography: Visualizing Photons in Motion at a Trillion Frames Per Second...


Abstract We have built an imaging solution that allows us to visualize propagation of light. The effective exposure time of each frame is two trillionths of a second and the resultant visualization depicts the movement of light at roughly half a trillion frames per second. Direct recording of reflected or scattered light at such a frame rate with sufficient brightness is nearly impossible. We use an indirect 'stroboscopic' method that records millions of repeated measurements by careful scanning in time and viewpoints. Then we rearrange the data to create a 'movie' of a nanosecond long event.


The following pictures are taken at 1000,000,000,000 frames a second; what does this mean? Photography is now faster than the speed of light. In the photos you are looking at light in slow motion...yes you read that right slow motion capture of photons.

Laser pulse shot through a bottle:





The project director Ramesh Raskar for the MIT team giving a TED talk about the technology of Femto photography:



More photos and video can be found here: Link to image source at MIT




posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:15 PM
link   
The video of the light passing through the bottle made my jaw drop.

Awesome


Gotta love TED.


Why do i have a urge to use this on house hold items i can destroy and see what it looks like at 1 trillion frames/second
edit on 24-10-2012 by MDDoxs because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:33 PM
link   
reply to post by MDDoxs
 

There's a lot to consider on many levels with this technology, imaging around corners, capturing and restructuring the light particles; as one use.

And then to think of this image shot with the same camera would take a year to watch.



Jaw dropping indeed.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:19 PM
link   
Use Search!
a camera that takes 1 trillion frames per second

If unsure try typing in a few words from article title. You will probably find the older thread.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by ZeroReady
Use Search!
a camera that takes 1 trillion frames per second

If unsure try typing in a few words from article title. You will probably find the older thread.
Your url is broken but I'm pretty sure this is at least the 4th time this has been posted, so I agree, use search. I would search something like:

trillion frames second

As that is probably going to appear in several of the articles on this topic.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:56 PM
link   
They created LIDAR tracking.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:38 PM
link   
I ALWAYS search.

I searched for Femto...and it came back with a single thread a long time ago talking about an application of the technology. Not the technology itself being faster than the speed of light at all anywhere in it.

If other posters cannot name the actual technology FEMTO in their posts how is that my fault? Searching photography brings back over 10,000 posts.

Plus your link is dead...how about previewing and checking your posts before cluttering up a thread about awesome science with junk.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:53 PM
link   
reply to post by BigBrotherDarkness
 

thanks for the article star for you.

i understand that light slows down as it propagates through a diamond medium. perhaps they should take a looksie at that!
regards f.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:33 PM
link   
reply to post by BigBrotherDarkness
 


well....it is more of a trick of photography.

They take several cameras, and then link all their individual frames together to create the "million FPS" resolution you see here. Anyone with a whole bunch of cameras, and an ability to stitch the photo's together in a timeline, can do this.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by BigBrotherDarkness
I ALWAYS search.

I searched for Femto...and it came back with a single thread a long time ago talking about an application of the technology. Not the technology itself being faster than the speed of light at all anywhere in it.

If other posters cannot name the actual technology FEMTO in their posts how is that my fault? Searching photography brings back over 10,000 posts.

Plus your link is dead...how about previewing and checking your posts before cluttering up a thread about awesome science with junk.


The users telling you to use the search function...ignore them. I would rather have a million repeat threads posted than to have the current trend of YouTube threads.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 12:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by BigBrotherDarkness
 


well....it is more of a trick of photography.

They take several cameras, and then link all their individual frames together to create the "million FPS" resolution you see here. Anyone with a whole bunch of cameras, and an ability to stitch the photo's together in a timeline, can do this.


Close! It is actually one camera, and it is stitched together from multiple events. So the camera is not capturing one photon, it is capturing many, many, many photons sent at different times and then creating a single event out of numerous events.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:02 AM
link   
reply to post by fakedirt
 

It would be very interesting to watch as pulse of photons are shot through a variety of objects...I hope they do this.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:05 AM
link   
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


I haven't even taken in the tech part side; I am still in awe that this is light, captured frame by frame as it travels...and enjoying the glow of that.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by BigBrotherDarkness
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


I haven't even taken in the tech part side; I am still in awe that this is light, captured frame by frame as it travels...and enjoying the glow of that.



If it was a single photon captured like that, it would be beyond breathtaking. What they have done is still ingenius, but not the technical marvel it appears to be at first glance.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:17 AM
link   
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


In the ted talk he says that's what it is; a single pulse shot like a photon bullet, I pretty sure I am filtering his accent correctly.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:43 AM
link   

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by BigBrotherDarkness
 


well....it is more of a trick of photography.

They take several cameras, and then link all their individual frames together to create the "million FPS" resolution you see here. Anyone with a whole bunch of cameras, and an ability to stitch the photo's together in a timeline, can do this.


But this isn't about the "million FPS" resolution, it's about a shutter speed, how long the cameras aperture is open to the light. In this case the shutter speed is faster than the speed of light, thus it captures light in movement, much like the propeller of a plane seeming to be not moving.

Capturing Movement




posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 01:54 AM
link   
reply to post by ANOK
 


It's not actually how this one works since I have decided to read up on how the tech side works...I needed to be able to field that side so I could understand any discussion better...still amazing to see a small ball of light in stop motion frame by frame no matter how they did it.


Basically, nanosecond laser pulses are shone on an object. In front of the camera is a narrow slit, so that only a thin slice of the laser light can be seen at one time -- the technical name for this device is a "streak camera." The laser pulses, with very complex timing circuitry, are then picked up by an array of 500 sensors in the camera -- but only one "scan line" at a time (thanks to the narrow slit). Using mirrors, the camera's angle of view is changed over time until each of these one-dimensional slices can be built up into a complete 2D image. This process, which takes about an hour, has led to one of its creators -- Ramesh Raskar -- to dub this trillion-FPS wonder "the world's slowest fastest camera."



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by ANOK
But this isn't about the "million FPS" resolution, it's about a shutter speed, how long the cameras aperture is open to the light. In this case the shutter speed is faster than the speed of light, thus it captures light in movement, much like the propeller of a plane seeming to be not moving.



You do realize you just said the shutter speed is faster than the speed of light. You do realize NOTHING is faster than the speed of light. If the shutter speed actually was faster than the speed of light it would attain infinite mass, which theoretically would suck the entire universe into a giant black hole.

You should read up on the camera and how it works.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:19 AM
link   

Originally posted by BigBrotherDarkness
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


In the ted talk he says that's what it is; a single pulse shot like a photon bullet, I pretty sure I am filtering his accent correctly.


Then he would be wrong, it is multiple pulses which is turned into a single event.



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 02:25 AM
link   
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


Yeah I wasn't literally saying a camera aperture was faster than light, just making an analogy with a regular camera. I should have been more clear.

But now I realise I made a mistake, for some reason I was thinking still photography not video. So a 'million FPS' is right.





new topics
top topics
 
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join