Meteor? Or...

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posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime

Originally posted by Char-Lee

Just for fun....what would it look like if some big ole ships were entering the atmosphere? Does that show like a meteor? Would it be on HUGE spike?


It might look like a meteor if the ships are ionizing the atmosphere around them, and the more the ionization the bigger the spike. Otherwise, big ole ships aren't what the system is designed to detect.


Thanks for the response.
What about particles from the CME are those picked up on this instrument?




posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Good question. I'm not sure if it can detect aurora or not. Watch it the next time one occurs and see what happens.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Good question. I'm not sure if it can detect aurora or not. Watch it the next time one occurs and see what happens.


Thanks. Appreciated.
I want to say

"your smart...make it go"...

But somehow I don't think you would understand.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


What brings you so far from home?



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by Char-Lee
 


What brings you so far from home?


Now I KNOW you are really smart!



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Is that the Pakled test?
I should start using that myself.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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Maybe the atmosphere is reverberating or something. That happens occasionally.



posted on Nov, 14 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Thanks for all your interest.

At Meteorscan we detect returned radar signals from meteor trails. The straight line of “spikes” that you are referring to are the DIRECT radar “blips” coming from our radar source in France.

When you see a continuous line on our screens it is due to Tropospheric Ducting ("Tropo" or "Ducting" for short) caused by temperature inversion low down in Earth's atmosphere. Where warmer and colder layers meet, a "duct" will be formed where radio waves (typically VHF and UHF) are "piped" along the duct where they escape many hundreds - or thousands - of miles away. Foggy conditions (which are also caused by temperature inversion) are often a good indication of this happening.

So, this is an unwanted direct signal from our Radar Source in France, caused by Tropospheric Propagation.

Try out our MultiScreen: www.merriott-astro.co.uk...

We normally don't have these lines of “spikes” because the radar is out of sight over the horizon, but during Tropospheric weather conditions the radar signal is trapped and follows the curvature of the Earth to reach us as a direct signal, which is actually what we don’t want!

Think of it as the radio waves are acting like a mirage – like when you can “see” over the horizon.

Approximately, our Radar Area covers England, Spain, France, Belgium, Netherlands, West Germany.

The blue baseline is the normal, ever present, natural, background radiation, part of which is the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) from the Big Bang 13.7 Billion Years ago!

To see how our normal meteor detections look, visit here (the blogger is one of our Team):

www.g7fek.co.uk...

Thanks for your interest.

Incidentally, we also detect Space Junk, the International Space Station (ISS), other Satellites, The Moon, Lightning Strikes.

I shall try and upload some images now for you. Here's hoping (first time).
Nope - Silly Blogsite - won't let me upload images. What a bunch of Dummies!

Iain.
Meteorscan Team
www.meteorscan.com...
www.normanlockyer.com...

edit on 15-11-2012 by METEORSCAN because: Additional Information



posted on Nov, 15 2012 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by METEORSCAN
 


Thank you this site is very helpful.





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