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MRSA (Flesh Eating Disease) on the Loose

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posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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Dang that's scary! I am a wrestler and one of my main drill partners had MRSA 2 years ago but it's still in his veins obviously. How at risk am I for it? Even if its not on his body at the time, could I get it from having an open wound on my face and wrestling with him or anything? Because I have a wound right now and I wrestle with him daily.




posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by Pressthebutton
 


DO NOT WRESTLE if you have open sores or wounds. It's too risky to yourself and others. CA-MRSA outbreaks started a decade or so ago mainly in gyms with contact sports like wrestling. ...Take care of yourself, and read this:


2007: Community-associated MRSA: a dangerous epidemic

Although a relatively unspectacular, nonmotile coccus, Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen and a major public health concern. In addition to being a common food-poisoning agent, it can cause serious skin and soft tissue infections and life-threatening diseases. Furthermore, resistance to multiple antibiotics, most notably to penicillin and methicillin, is common in S. aureus and makes treatment especially difficult. However, the biggest current threat from this human pathogen is the pandemic spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), a crisis affecting many aspects of our social life and second only to HIV/AIDS in scope and importance.

Infections with MRSA have traditionally been limited to healthcare settings and individuals with risk factors for infection. Therefore, it came as quite a shock when MRSA infections unrelated to hospitals were reported in healthy individuals beginning in the late 1990s: first in children, later in professional football players and other sports teams, prisoners and men who have sex with men (MSM). The strains that cause these infections are remarkable because they combine antibiotic resistance with exceptional virulence and transmissibility, a phenomenon unprecedented with S. aureus. Moreover, while most S. aureus infections were previously thought to originate from nasal colonization, transmission of CA-MRSA includes body-to-body and sexual contacts. Within a very short period of time, CA-MRSA have become not only the most frequent causes of soft- and skin- tissue infections in the community, but are also replacing traditional MRSA strains in hospitals on a large scale.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:47 AM
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I am not a doctor, I have had many infections years ago, now use oreganol P73 every few months orally and it seems to keep it all in check, you can't take oreganol for more than a few weeks at a time and need to take iron supplements and b12 to prevent other problems(chelitis, red sores corner of mouth from b12 and iron deficiency), along with eating yogurt, seems the oreganol blocks iron. After a few scars I now am very aware of any tiny red bumps.Bio oil helps the scars go away after the wound heals.Silver (guardian gel) and Oreganol after a small dab of aspirin dissolved in alcohol and tea tree oil, is the best to help heal any starting infections, do not do this with deep or puncture wounds, I am talking about scrapes and bumps. I find that if treated as soon as possible the infection can be killed easily. Still believe the first time I had it it was from a friend that works in a hospital, second time from a dirty bar towel, third from a shirt that was dry cleaned, fourth, after a flight on a plane, started on my neck, fifth on back and side of leg from a tour bus, sixth from a pillow at a hotel, shoulder and neck.seventh lower back another hotel. If you see a red bump and less than a half hour later it is swollen and/or puss filled treat it right away, after a few times you know the "tinge" feeling it causes at first. Why take a chance. The quick treat also prevents boils, and skin infection. Get a cut, clean it, cover with silver gel and bandage, if its red the next day put some manaku honey on it. As you can guess, I have no faith in antibiotics anymore.To help heal a wound fast curcumin(turmeric) orally seems to work really well, and eating baby smoked oyster help with skin healing. Sometimes use tea tree oil and lavender with olive oil to protect exposed skin when I am in an area that might be contaminated.
also use ammonia or peroxide to clean and on food surfaces tea tree oil and white vinegar or silver colloidal solution
Any one have better suggestions, or a way to prevent it altogether?



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by timmhaines
 



If you see a red bump and less than a half hour later it is swollen and/or puss filled treat it right away, after a few times you know the "tinge" feeling it causes at first. Why take a chance. The quick treat also prevents boils, and skin infection. Get a cut, clean it, cover with silver gel and bandage, if its red the next day put some manaku honey on it. As you can guess, I have no faith in antibiotics anymore.To help heal a wound fast curcumin(turmeric) orally seems to work really well, and eating baby smoked oyster help with skin healing. Sometimes use tea tree oil and lavender with olive oil to protect exposed skin when I am in an area that might be contaminated.
also use ammonia or peroxide to clean and on food surfaces tea tree oil and white vinegar or silver colloidal solution
Any one have better suggestions, or a way to prevent it altogether?


Your "Stop it before it starts" approach sounds good to me.
HOWEVER, no one should rely on medical advice from the internet. Any infection that keeps getting worse must be seen by a doctor - MRSA can kill - or leave you disfigured and disabled for life.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in the year 2005, MRSA was responsible for an estimated 94,000 invasive life-threatening infections and close to 19,000 deaths (more than AIDS).

That said...

In my opinion, our world and biology are a variety of inter-connected "systems," each of which helps the others to integrate, assimilate and "come into harmony" with each other and the whole. In this light, antibiotics are "alien" - "antibiotic resistance" is not just about bacteria learning to survive and thrive in environments contaminated with alien chemicals, but also about bacteria sharing their abilities with us and other creatures living on our planet. From a global perspective, everything that happens in our various "systems" is designed to bring all the 'systems' together in balance and compatibility. So yeah, using "natural" treatments makes the most sense to me.



PS. Did you know? October is MRSA Awareness Month - just noticed. Tripped over one reference. Just one.






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