MRSA (Flesh Eating Disease) on the Loose

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posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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I think some of the posts that are being placed are people with typical staph infections, not MRSA. I wish it was no big deal like some of the posters here are saying. You clearly did not have a MRSA infection. What you have or had was a garden-variety staph infections like Impetigo. We are talking about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by VAPatriot
I think some of the posts that are being placed are people with typical staph infections, not MRSA. I wish it was no big deal like some of the posters here are saying. You clearly did not have a MRSA infection. What you have or had was a garden-variety staph infections like Impetigo. We are talking about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).


Impetigo is not caused by staph. it is caused by strep.

Regardless, it isn't like MRSA is some kind of Rambo staph. It is just like any other staph, but is resistant to antibiotics. Untreated, it is just like any staph and no more or less capable of killing someone.

"Superbug" doesn't mean "more virulent". It means "resistant to treatment".



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by KentuckyMan
I don't get what all the hype is about on this thing.

My father in law has it my wife has it...

It start's off like a boil..just pop it and suck all the crap out of it and take some antibiotics lol

It's nto a BIG of a deal as yall think lol

Not to mention i live with my wife for 11+ years share bodily fluids and have 3 kids we dont got it lol

ITS ALL HYPE!!!!!


BTW my wife got it after our 3rd kid she had a C section and got it from the hospital before she left...
So dont leave hospitals out as prob the main agent in it spreading lol
edit on 23-10-2012 by KentuckyMan because: (no reason given)


Well, and it isn't like you can trace it back to them, either. Staph is part of our natural flora living on our skin. You are literally covered in staph. Only occasionally does it actually create an infection, where it goes from living ON our skin, to living IN our tissue.

I would bet that almost half of the population has MRSA colonies somewhere on their body. Maybe it takes over and expands to cover more of the body, maybe not. The internal dynamics of the way bugs move and grow has a lot to do with the types of antibiotics you take, and how often you take them.

But MRSA, like any other staph, is present on a lot of people. You can contract it from a scratch, if staph infects the wound. And why wouldn't it? It is already on the skin, and likely commingles when an injury happens.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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MRSA is not common in people, half of the people here mixing up regular Opportunistic Staph with MRSA infection. The infection is the same BUT MRSA can't be killed with normal antibiotic.

Staph is an opportunistic bacterium. Soon as they see the host drop in immune system or heavily medicated, they come on the offensive. MRSA is obtained from Hospital setting most of the time, its very unlikely to find it in everyday setting, unless someone is shedding them off everywhere.

MRSA or rather Methicillin is not a everyday Antibiotic, as the level of Antibiotic goes up, the danger of side effect as well, it includes deafness and blindness, Vancomyin are our last resistance at the moment, but VRSA are known to exist but not widespread.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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I survived Mrsa, staph... whatever.

It can be life threatning. Don't make the mistake of thinking its a cyst/pimple vs mrsa. I had it, took the core out myself with tools, didn't have to have stiches. Now i have a "stab looking wound" on my side...

To be man...



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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After the months of antibotic treatments I was still scared it would come back. Nasal swabs were coming back good, but I wanted to be very sure not to infect anyone around me. I began taking two homeopathic remedies for good measure, Manuka Honey and Allicin Garlic. Both are natural antibiotics. Just thought I would put this out there as a bit of information.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by DirtyLiberalHippie
 



Yep it is common, but to suggest it is not a "real threat"? That is ignorant to say the least.... It is more than just dangerous, it has a habit of being LETHAL... Healthy or not! Yep, it lives on your skin and often times, if you do a swab can be found in your nose.... This doesn't mean it isn't a VERY lethal and usually unstoppable threat, my friend. It is..... Very lethal and pretty unstoppable.


Thanks for your consistently informed and reasonable posts. Much appreciated.


.....Many posters here are dealing with old out-dated information. CA-MRSA is a lethal, virulent Super Bug - the kind of 'harmless' staph people are talking about has mutated and evolved to be very dangerous.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 





The most common cause of impetigo is an infection with Staphylococcus aureus (staph infection). Streptococcus is the other cause of impetigo (this bacteria is well known for causing strep throat).


Impentigo



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 



Impetigo is not caused by staph. it is caused by strep.


Much of your info is on track but lots is out-dated and inaccurate. Please keep posting but catch up fast, kay?




Nonbullous impetigo is caused by Staphylococcus aureus, group A beta hemolytic streptococci (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes), or a combination of both. Most infections begin as a streptococcal infection, but staphylococci replace the streptococci over time.

Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), which can be hospital or community acquired, is an increasingly common cause of impetigo[4] ; this pathogen is observed more often with the nonbullous form of impetigo than the bullous form. Over the last decade, an increasing number of community-acquired MRSA and gentamicin-resistant S aureus strains have been reported as a cause of impetigo.[5]




...it isn't like MRSA is some kind of Rambo staph. It is just like any other staph, but is resistant to antibiotics. Untreated, it is just like any staph and no more or less capable of killing someone.

"Superbug" doesn't mean "more virulent". It means "resistant to treatment".


Please, PLEASE read more. CA-MRSA is not ordinary old staph - new mutations have made staph incredibly virulent, widespread and dangerous. Other posters and I go to a lot of trouble to search and link important information - it's just respectful to at least scan it.




Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious threat to worldwide health. Historically, MRSA clones have strictly been associated with hospital settings, and most hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) disease resulted from a limited number of virulent clones. Recently, MRSA has spread into the community causing disease in otherwise healthy people with no discernible contact with healthcare environments. These community-associated MRSA clones (CA-MRSA) are phylogenetically distinct from traditional HA-MRSA clones, and CA-MRSA strains seem to exhibit hypervirulence and more efficient host : host transmission. Consequently, CA-MRSA clones belonging to the USA300 lineage have become dominant sources of MRSA infections in North America. The rise of this successful USA300 lineage represents an important step in the evolution of emerging pathogens and a great deal of effort has been exerted to understand how these clones evolved. Here, we review much of the recent literature aimed at illuminating the source of USA300 success and broadly categorize these findings into three main categories: newly acquired virulence genes, altered expression of common virulence determinants and alterations in protein sequence that increase fitness. We argue that none of these evolutionary events alone account for the success of USA300, but rather their combination may be responsible for the rise and spread of CA-MRSA.



Deny ignorance.



edit on 23/10/12 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:49 PM
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As somone with a family history of overactive auto immune disorders im not worried. If there is some sort of pandemic all my antibodies will have something to play with.

Good luck to the rest of you though.

edit on 23-10-2012 by Wertdagf because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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I think that the answer they are searching for is Copper

Some of you may be suprised at just how important copper is.

Antimicrobial Properties of Copper


Numerous antimicrobial efficacy studies have been conducted in the past 10 years regarding copper’s efficacy to destroy a wide range of bacteria, as well as influenza A virus, adenovirus, and fungi.[93]

MRSA

Also some other interesting pieces you may find useful to share is
Copper Deficiency
You will find this interesting because it imho signals a cure for Alzheimer's Disease
Neurotransmitter
I could go in but dont want to spoil the thread.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Additive Restores Antibiotic Effectiveness Against MRSA

Researchers from North Carolina State University have increased the potency of a compound that reactivates antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an antibiotic-resistant form of Staphylococcus that is notoriously difficult to treat. Their improved compound removes the bacteria’s antibiotic resistance and allows the antibiotic to once again become effective at normal dosage levels.





Some of the MRSA strains we work with require 512 micrograms per milliliter of the antibiotic of choice to control growth – 500 times over the limit. Adding our compound brought the level down to one microgram per milliliter again.”


Source

This is very good news. This just released today.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by VAPatriot
 


Great stuff. Keep it coming mi amigo.

Deny ignorance.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by Sissel

Originally posted by VAPatriot


Most MRSA infections are allegedly treatable with vancomycin, a powerful intravenous drug, but the new USA600 strain has proven itself to be nearly impervious to the drug. Now for MRSA patients the mortality rate is 20 – 50%.


Those are horrifying statistics, and it makes you wonder how many deaths from MRSA are covered up as being listed as another cause.





The death rate from MRSA in the United States continues to climb as MRSA goes under reported by U.S. healthcare facilities and 85% of all MRSA infections originate in healthcare facilities. Well over 19,000 Americans die from invasive MRSA every year and 2,600 from community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). MRSA continues to be a secret and silent killer.

Read more here: www.heraldonline.com...=cpy



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh
I personally have had two bouts with MRSA. The first bout put me in the hospital on IV medications for 3 days and an additional 14 days of oral antibiotics that had some horrendous side effects that I suffered from, the least of which was "dry mouth". I was less than 72 hours into the infection when I was hospitalized, and during treatment my blood pressure "bottomed out" several times due to the medication and I was literally on death's door for the first 48 hours.

The second bout was less than a year later, and put me in the hospital for 2 days on IV medications, and an additional 14 days of oral antibiotics. The second time, the infection spread much quicker, less than 24 hours.

This infection is nothing to play with, and almost always requires hospitalization with IV antibiotics and close medical supervision for anything more than a "surface" or very mild case, and each subsequent infection moves more quickly through the system, and requires a higher dose of IV drugs for each subsequent infection if it occurs within 3 years.

I was told by medical staff, and not widely known or distributed information, that it takes your body 3 years to "recover" from the damage that the antibiotics do to your system.

Contrary to what has been stated here, it does not "only affect people with compromised immune systems". However, they are the ones that are most likely to die from this infection or suffer serious consequences from it in a very short period of time.

Other than advanced arthritis in my hip, I am in good health, and take care of myself. If I had a compromised immune system, I most likely would have died, or lost my arm (first instance) or my foot/leg (second instance).
edit on 10/22/2012 by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh because: add
Sounds like you had one bout and never recovered the first time.Nasty stuff my daughter had it as well and like you was hospitalized for three days.By the time we realized something was wrong(I never heard of mrsa) she had a high temperature and was throwing up.Luckily the antibiotics took care of it.
I had a bad car accident back in 2008,thankfully all I got out of it was 4 broken ribs.Long story short due to complications(excess fluid in my lungs) I ended up back in the hospital with pneumonia.I was put on iv antibiotics if I remember correctly it was Leviquin.As of today I wake up every morning unable to walk on my achillies tendons as they are completely stiff and takes awhile to loosen up,well I found out that was one of the side effects of these antibiotics.They can cause your tendons to rupture and may never heal,mine haven't and probably won't.i believe there was a tort case involving this antibiotic.

So what can be a blessing as I realize they(antibiotics) have saved many lives,the doctors or nurses should give patients all possible side effects of all meds so you know what to look for.My advice?ask them because they won't volunteer the information.
edit on 23-10-2012 by TWILITE22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by VAPatriot
I think some of the posts that are being placed are people with typical staph infections, not MRSA. I wish it was no big deal like some of the posters here are saying. You clearly did not have a MRSA infection. What you have or had was a garden-variety staph infections like Impetigo. We are talking about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

I have proof i had mrsa, and still do. Have had repeated constant infections of mrsa for over a year.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by phroziac

Originally posted by VAPatriot
I think some of the posts that are being placed are people with typical staph infections, not MRSA. I wish it was no big deal like some of the posters here are saying. You clearly did not have a MRSA infection. What you have or had was a garden-variety staph infections like Impetigo. We are talking about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

I have proof i had mrsa, and still do. Have had repeated constant infections of mrsa for over a year.


Is that you in your avatar picture? If so, you might consider eating a low carb diet to shed a few pounds. At best, you will decrease infection. At worst, you will have excess skin to remove, thus removing the apocrine glands and greatly reducing risk of infection.

Have you ever looked into hidradenitis suppurativa

Beyond that, don't bother proving things to anyone on ATS. It is a CT website. Your proof will cause cognitive dissonance.
edit on 23-10-2012 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 06:53 PM
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What I had was MRSA. They had me in the quarantine floor of the hospital and wherever I went, like for x-rays and such, I had a yellow gown draped over me to signify that I was infectious.

They cut the infected finger open down to the bone from the end joint to the middle of my palm. The wound was left open for a week after I left the hospital, and I had to soak it in saline solution every 6 hours.

I returned to have it stitched up after it had been open for a total of two weeks. It sucked.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


Thanks for sharing.
...You're lucky you didn't lose your finger! And remember, this stuff tends to recur, so take good care.





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