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MRSA (Flesh Eating Disease) on the Loose

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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I have been tracking MRSA and other SuperBugs for years and posting about them on ATS. Here are a few of my related threads:
* 2011: Flesh-Eating Disease Bug Common in US Beef, Chicken
* 2007: Superbug "MRSA" Now Transmitted Sexually
* 2007: Superbug Epidemic in US - Now Threatening Canada
* 2006: Beyond Bird Flu: The Perfect Microbial Storm

Here is a quick overview of the mainstream headline history:


2005: Superbug linked to flesh-eating disease

Doctors have reported an alarming number of MRSA patients being attacked by a life-threatening flesh-eating infection in the US.

The patients seem to have caught a new form of the notorious "superbug" outside hospital. Several developed complications and needed lengthy stays in intensive care and reconstructive surgery.

The doctors, who identified 14 such patients during 15 months at their medical centre in Los Angeles County, California, warn in the New England Journal of Medicine that clinicians may not recognise that necrotising fasciitis, as the flesh-eating condition is properly known, can be caused by MRSA.



2008: The Great MRSA Epidemic: Is It Time to Worry?

Flesh-eating bacteria. A drug-resistant menace, spreading silently through hospital hallways.

If one were asked to come up with a recipe for a panic-inducing disease, it would be hard to come up with something more horrifying than methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus -- or MRSA.



2012: 'Flesh-eating' bacteria strain spread by sneezes and coughs

London - Medical experts in the UK have warned the public to be vigilant about their health to guard against infection by a highly infectious strain of MRSA called USA300, that causes a deadly form of pneumonia, skin boils and abscesses.

The deadly bacteria can be easily passed between people in public places through sneezes and coughs and through contact with the skin of an infected person.

'Community-acquired strains better at infecting the young and healthy'

PHYSorg.com explains that the hospital strains cause disease in hospital patients who are already weakened by illness. Medical institutions have in recent years been making progress in controlling the hospital strains. They are now concerned about the emergence of the community-acquired strains which attack young healthy people.

Thomas said that community-acquired strains are better at infecting young and healthy people because, unlike the hospital strains that are exposed to powerful drugs and disinfectants, community-acquired strains have not invested genetic resources to developing resistance to man-made agents. They are, therefore, able to develop more powerful disease causing toxins….



MRSA Bacteria Facts Information and Treatment Options

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. It may also be called multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA).

MRSA is, by definition, any strain of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that has developed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, which include the penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, etc.) and the cephalosporins.

…MRSA stands for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. …MRSA is so named because it cannot be treated by most of the known antibiotics - making it possibly deadly to those who are infected. …

Most people have heard about the recent rash of MRSA staph infections that have been found in schools and other communities in the United States. For those of you who aren't aware of what MRSA is, it's a deadly flesh eating bacteria that has taken thousands of lives globally each year



reply to post by Muckster
 

reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 

reply to post by littled16
 

reply to post by deadeyedick
 



edit on 22/10/12 by soficrow because: format
edit on 22/10/12 by soficrow because: format
edit on 22/10/12 by soficrow because: format
edit on 22/10/12 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by Komonazmuk
reply to post by soficrow
 


A bit of fear mongering on the OP's part;


Though most MRSA infections aren't serious, some can be life-threatening. Many public health experts are alarmed by the spread of tough strains of MRSA. Because it's hard to treat, MRSA is sometimes called a "super bug."


www.webmd.com...

I don't want either MRSA or "flesh eating disease" but OP was misleading.


If you work for a nursing home in my state, you have to sign a waiver that you are aware of MRSA and how contagious it is. If you have known anyone with MRSA, you would see what a nasty disease it can be. Also, many surgeons don't want to operate on you if you have MRSA and WILL decline to do so. OP is not exaggerating at all.

This is from the CDC:


The consequences of MRSA bacteremia are clear—many patients will die or experience a decline from their baseline clinical condition. The adjusted risk difference enables clinicians to use a targeted approach, directed toward patients with the highest risk for death—i.e., the elderly, patients with liver cirrhosis, patients with renal insufficiency, and patients from nursing homes.




Invasive Infections
•In 2005, about 94,000 persons developed their first invasive (i.e., serious) MRSA infection, of which approximately 19,000 died. Of these infections, about 86% are healthcare-associated and 14% are community-associated.
(Klevens et al. Journal of the American Medical Association 2007;298(15):1763-1771 [PDF 229KB/9 pages]
edit on 22-10-2012 by Gridrebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by littled16
 



We had a battle with MRSA several years back. 3 out of 4 people in the house had it after being unknowingly exposed by a kid that spent the night. MRSA is a variety of staph infection that is VERY contagious and highly resistant to antibiotics. It took almost a year to get rid of it ...numerous rounds of different combinations of medicines to get rid of it, and endless hours upon hours of cleaning and sterilizing every surface in the house, cars, etc.


Sorry to hear it but glad you're all okay. And you're right - MRSA IS a staph infection (not strep). Used to be relatively harmless but now it's bloody dangerous.



MRSA is not the same as the flesh eating bacteria, but it is tough and can kill you if it goes untreated.


Actually, MRSA does cause flesh eating disease: 2005: Doctors have reported an alarming number of MRSA patients being attacked by a life-threatening flesh-eating infection in the US.. ...You are lucky - and I am SO glad you got medical care, cleaned, sanitized and did NOT rely on colloidal silver to treat your family's infections!



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


The properties of staph are that it will "tunnel" from area to area, and will "tunnel" to the surface. This looks like a big, sucking hole. The hole will grow in the place of the lesion.

But its ability to move laterally across the body is limited to this small scale tunneling. It is "flesh eating", yes. But what is typically known as "flesh eating", and has been in the news recently with that girl that fell from the zip line, and the mom who was infected while giving birth, is strep. It moves along the fascia and can spread to infect very large portions of the body.

Just about any bacteria that infects tissue is "flesh eating" in that it causes death of the tissue that it comes in contact with to one degree or another. It doesn't really eat the flesh. It just causes it to die from disease, usually causing necrosis.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh
 



I have had two bouts with MRSA ...Contrary to what has been stated here, it does not "only affect people with compromised immune systems". However, they are the ones that are most likely to die from this infection or suffer serious consequences from it in a very short period of time.

Other than advanced arthritis in my hip, I am in good health, and take care of myself. If I had a compromised immune system, I most likely would have died, or lost my arm (first instance) or my foot/leg (second instance).


Thank you for sharing. You are quite right - and very lucky! Glad you're okay. …FYI - Hospital-acquired MRSA is worse for the elderly and immune-compromised but community-acquired MRSA strains are better at infecting young and healthy people.


Flesh eating disease is caused by the same bacteria as MRSA


Almost right.
…Flesh eating disease can be caused by MRSA. Flesh eating disease, or necrotizing fasciitis (NF), can be caused by several different bacteria acting alone or in combination: Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis and/or Aeromonas hydrophila. Not ALL infections get into the deeper layers of the skin and tissues to cause NF.



Necrotizing fasciitis or NF, commonly known as flesh-eating disease or flesh-eating bacteria syndrome,[1] is a rare infection of the deeper layers of skin and subcutaneous tissues, easily spreading across the fascial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. …

Type I describes a polymicrobial infection, whereas Type II describes a monomicrobial infection. Many types of bacteria can cause necrotizing fasciitis (e.g., Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis, Aeromonas hydrophila[3]).

Historically, Group A streptococcus made up most cases of Type II infections. However, since as early as 2001, another serious form of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis has been observed with increasing frequency,[5] caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).


Thanks again, sofi



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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For what it is worth, my own grandma is one of the rare survivors of this horrible bacteria... She got it in her old nursing home... And yes... It was going unreported to us! At the time we lived about an hour away.... So we only visited her once every couple weeks...

It was her room mate that called us and told us for the past three days she had been laying in her bed, unresponsive.... But that's an issue for another thread.

She got MRSA via the carelessness of a crappy nursing home... And no she is not there any more...

Anyway, We did not know what it was at first, we had her sent to the hospital and while in the ER.... There was this HORRIBLE stench... No one could figure out where it was coming from. It filled the entire ER. The nurses, janitors, doctors... Anyone who had a spare moment would search for it....

It wasn't until after the doctor did a check of her body that they found the source of the smell... It was her! She had these huge holes rotted through her abdomen! The smell was basically week old rotted flesh and there was this... Green stuff running out... That I can only compare with... A melted green crayon.

She was put in isolation immediately as the doctor pretty much knew what it was...They cultured it and yes, it was MRSA.

She was taken to ICU. She was there for about 6 months. She had surgery every single day... Sometimes several per day. Essentially, scraping out her insides... Trying their best to remove the infected bits...

Each time she went back to surgery, she was expected to die on the table...Yet some how... She made it through each one... They even thought she would need a colostomy...But... She was lucky enough to end up not needing that either...

Though she was kept on a respirator the entire time...Eventually though... She made it... She was weak... But my god she put up a fight like I've never seen before! She was given the option to just give up...But she fought... She figured...What has she got to lose?

She fought and some how made it... But her hospital stay was followed by another 3-4 months in rehab.... She lost most of the muscle in her abdomen, several organs...Luckily none she couldn't live with out...

It really stunned the doctors that she made it... This thing usually kills young and healthy people! She was an older person in not very good shape.... But she did...

Anyway, MRSA is nothing to mess with... It is a horrible thing to get and a horrible thing to watch some one suffer with... The problem is, it is resistant to most anti-biotics...It's just so hard to kill....

They put my grandma on several broad spectrum anti biotics... And that, on top of all the surgeries removing the infected bits... every day for 6 months is what saved her... That's how dangerous this stuff is...

If ever there were a reason to keep clean... and to watch your loved ones who happen to be in nursing homes....

MRSA is it!

I just hope they find a better and more successful treatment for it some day...

Now, sadly... She is dealing with Alzheimer's... And...Some day... When they find a cure for it... Likely, long after she is gone... Yeah, I will probably cry... Because... My god... The suffering I have seen her go through, from MRSA and now Alzheimers.... It's just... Awful and heart breaking.

Anyway, I just...Felt like sharing that... It may or may not be quite on topic...But... Somehow it just felt appropriate.

Thank you all for listenting.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 



MRSA is not the flesh eating disease that makes so many headlines. It is dangerous for sure....but it lives on your skin.

The real threat, and flesh eater, is strep. Yup, that same infection that gives you a sore throat. That is where the risk is. MRSA is typically a threat to someone with a decreased immune system. Strep, however, is what has been in the headlines.


Thanks for posting and for your passionate interest.
....Looks like all the "harmless" bacteria are evolving into Super Bugs. I didn't notice the strep headlines but have been following MRSA for years - and tracking its evolution from a relatively harmless mild infection into a dangerous Super Bug. Here are a few MRSA headlines from ATS and the mainstream media leading up to this thread. ALL are worth at least a quick scan:

* 2005: Superbug linked to flesh-eating disease. ...Doctors have reported an alarming number of MRSA patients being attacked by a life-threatening flesh-eating infection in the US.

* 2006: Beyond Bird Flu: The Perfect Microbial Storm

* 2007: Superbug "MRSA" Now Transmitted Sexually
* 2007: Superbug Epidemic in US - Now Threatening Canada

* 2008: The Great MRSA Epidemic: Is It Time to Worry? Flesh-eating bacteria.

* 2011: Flesh-Eating Disease Bug Common in US Beef, Chicken

* 2012: 'Flesh-eating' bacteria strain spread by sneezes and coughs. London - Medical experts in the UK have warned the public to be vigilant about their health to guard against infection by a highly infectious strain of MRSA called USA300



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Have you ever read The Stand? Not the movie, but the actual book. The first half is horrible, but the second half is amazing.

It addresses the super bug concept. It was my first exposure to the concept back int he late 80's when I borrow the book from a friend.

But you are right. We have managed to turn everyday killers into super killers. Either in the lab, or ust through forced evolution as a response to antibiotics.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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I have dealt with MRSA since a hospital visit a year ago. It was nasty and stubborn to get rid of. I took a combination of three antibiotics for months, washed with Hibiclens (chlorhexidine glauconite) daily.

The tricky part is that MRSA will stay with you. You can't just treat the wound and be done with it. It can live happily, latent in your nasal passages. I had to decolonize those with Bactroban (basically Bactrim in a petroleum jelly and you swab your nose with it, yuck).

Natural remedies helped too. Turmeric applied topically worked phenomenally to reduce swelling, redness and dry it out. It also hurt to apply because the tincture was made with a bit of ethanol! I also took tumeric orally three times a day (about 500 mg each).

Interestingly enough, I have lived with my partner and shared the same bed and he has not gotten infected. His doc even swabbed his nose for culture and it was negative! It is not as virulent as it seems, so long as your wounds are covered and you keep bedding, towels etc. cleaned. Very clean.

Oh, I also forgot to mention that cleaning the wounds with topical iodine multiple times a day was also essential.
edit on 22-10-2012 by TheOtter because: Iodine



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by Komonazmuk
 



A bit of fear mongering on the OP's part;


No - just awareness of this SuperBug's history and biological reality. …When a disease finds animal reservoirs, goes zoonotic and starts jumping back and forth between species, look out! Here's a brief overview of warnings about CA-MRSA from scientists and doctors:


2005: Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Its Emerging Virulence

Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are an emerging problem in the United States and many parts of the world. These infections originate in communities as opposed to hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections. If adequate measures are not taken to thoroughly understand and control its changing epidemiology and clinical presentation, it may become a significant public health problem in the near future.



2005: Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Los Angeles

Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening infection requiring urgent surgical and medical therapy. Staphylococcus aureus has been a very uncommon cause of necrotizing fasciitis, but we have recently noted an alarming number of these infections caused by community- associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA).



2006: Community-associated MRSA: Superbug at our doorstep

Clones of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are spreading with alarming rapidity and are replacing methicillin-sensitive strains of S. aureus as the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infection. Methicillin resistance among community isolates of S. aureus has already exceeded a staggering 70% in Houston2 and Atlanta3 and threatens to emerge in force north of the border. CA-MRSA is an “old foe with new fangs”4: a pathogen combining virulence, resistance and an ability to disseminate at large.5 Most CA-MRSA infections involve the skin and soft tissue; however, severe and sometimes fatal infections have been observed, including sepsis, necrotizing pneumonia, purpura fulminans, pyomyositis and necrotizing fasciitis, even in healthy patients.



2008: Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections (SSTI's) Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has become epidemic.

…In the United States, a single clone of CA-MRSA (USA 300 ST-8) has become the most prevalent cause of staphylococcal SSTI acquired in the community…

…SSTIs due to CA-MRSA predominantly affect children, young adults, and middle-aged adults [7, 8, 13, 43, 44]. The median age for adults infected with CA-MRSA ranges from 20 to 47 years [6, 44, 45]. …Many patients with CA-MRSA infections do not have recognized risk factors for the acquisition of MRSA

CA-MRSA strains can produce a variety of SSTIs, ranging from impetigo to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis…

In general, the prognosis for patients with SSTI due to CA-MRSA is very good. Death is quite uncommon, and the rate is certainly lower than that among patients infected with nosocomial MRSA [6]. However, the recurrence of lesions is frequent [28, 68].




2008:The reported number of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing rapidly. ...

CA-MRSA is associated with invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis (3), sepsis (4), and pneumonia (5). The USA300 strain, which is also found in Europe (6), was first isolated in the Netherlands in 2002.



2009: Managing CA-MRSA Infections

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) must be recognized now as one of the most common causes of infections acquired in the community. The majority of these infections involve the skin and soft tissue structures and confer significant morbidity on those affected. In addition, serious invasive and often fatal episodes of necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, endocarditis, and sepsis are being reported with increased frequency.


[lots more but out of space]

edit on 22/10/12 by soficrow because: order



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:55 AM
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ok... real quick.
MRSA Vs "Necrotizing fasciitis

MRSA is a Staphylococcal bacteria that has evolved into a strain that is now immune to "first line" antibiotics. namely "everything up to and including Methicillin". "usually" it was only an issue in hospitals, places with immune compromised patients & large number of antibiotic cleaning products (that which does no kill it, allows it to carry forward drug resistant genes. take that "creationism") generally at that point, the Doc will reach into his bag of tricks and find something akin to Vancomycin or stronger to beat the infection into submission. look for a new catch phrase in the coming years VRSA (Vancomycin Resistant Staph Aureus) . it's out there, so finish all of your antibiotics.


on the other hand "Flesh Eating Bacteria" is not one single bacteria... but a condition, "Necrotizing fasciitis". a condition marked by the rapid infection and death of skin cells in the fascia layer of skin. this infection gets nasty fast & spreads to other areas of the body just as quickly.

there are 2 types. Type I is polymicrobial. meaning it's not just one bacteria but numerous bugs. one infection creates a perfect incubator for another (ie. a aerobic bacteria will create a space for a Anaerobic bacteria to thrive). sucks, because you not only have to fight a rapidly moving infection, it's also a rapidly evolving infection as you could be dealing with 4-5 different bugs that have to be dealt with by 4-5 different antibiotics.

Type II is monomicrobial. same as type one, but it's only one bacteria. "Generally" it's a Group A Staph. which brings us back to it's "Frankenstein brother" MRSA.

and now you've done it, you made me link to a Wiki page.
Necrotizing fasciitis - wiki
edit on 23-10-2012 by jazkaat because: spelling...



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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I have dealt with MRSA since a hospital visit a year ago. It was nasty and stubborn to get rid of. I took a combination of three antibiotics for months, washed with Hibiclens (chlorhexidine glauconite) daily.
reply to post by TheOtter
 

The same regimen I had to deal with when I had MRSA. I took vancomycin delivered by pic line into my aorta for 4 weeks.
I got the MRSA through a mosquito bite on my right index finger. After two trips to the doctor and the pain and swelling not responding to two different antibiotics, I went to the ER. The hand surgeon told me that I was an hour away from losing my hand. I still have limited mobility and numbness in my index finger 5 years later.

ETA: I snorted a solution of diluted hibiclens followed by saline solution and my nasal passages tested MRSA-clean 6 months later (they were MRSA colonized before).
edit on 23-10-2012 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 06:34 AM
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Oh my, when I saw the drug called called vancomycin, it brings back memories from a few years ago that I try to forget. Here is my Mrsa story and thought of the topic:

It all started with a ruptured disc in my back L5-S1 and had surgery. Felt great with two weeks or so of recovery. Went back to work. Three weeks later, the back pain started again. But this time, it was different. I'd scream in pain as if every muscle was tightening up in my back while ten screw drivers were being screwed into my lower back. I dealt with it until my mother rushed me to 911 room.

There it was..... from an MRI showing the 'darker shadows around my spine' lives the dreadful....MRSA. Eating away at my spine, positivily contracted from my previous back surgery. This called for a spinal fusion, borrowing some bone off my hip (ouch! Sore there for months after)) to place into my spine area to make up for all the infection/MERSA they had to saw out from my spine. Took place about month or two after a ruptured disc surgury.

The disc surgery followed (within the month!) a thumb surgery due to PASTURELLA infection (here kitty kitty--cat bite). That's when i first met the 24/7 wire-connected antibiotic meds for eight weeks.

You think running a 5k benefit race with a ruptured disc is painful not knowing?? Yea.....try MRSA filled up in your spin for 30 days. My stomach is still sore from where they went in via the front, entering my spine to remove the mrsa. Strange, as you think it'd be the back. (Wait, that was just closed up from last months surgery *smirk* )

Anyways... two months of being best friends with Vancomycin connected with a tube 24-7- I had to share my MRSA story when i saw that drug! That drug must be so powerful....I didn't have to shower for weeks and you'd never smell it. Good thing... being how inmobile I was from three surgeries in a row in 2-3 months.

MRSA is more common than one thinks....this isn't some new virus or outbreak 'end of world' apocolyps; it's about a bad bad BAD bug that hospitals (nurses hate the word i found too) don't like to talk about because many of the cases are contracted in those facilities under top notch care. (About $64,000 poorer after a surgery gone bad. .. THATS what the disclaimers are requiring all your signatures are really for peoples! No one can be reliable except for self. If I only had a case.....I'd be living in my own island. Mersa-free of course :-)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by CheeseCurd
 

Wow! MRSA that deep in your body, especially the spine... You are truly lucky to be alive.

Vancomycin is really strong. I started off with an IV drip in my arm, and it burned a lot when it went in. I could even taste it.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 06:50 AM
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Originally posted by Muckster
reply to post by soficrow
 


Sorry, i'm no expert, but i thought that the "flesh eating bug" and "MRSA" were two different things.

Flesh eating bug

MRSA


You are correct in noting that most cases are caused by staph, but MRSA also qualifies. Apparently it has mutated. From your 2nd link:


Type I describes a polymicrobial infection, whereas Type II describes a monomicrobial infection. Many types of bacteria can cause necrotizing fasciitis (e.g., Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes), Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides fragilis, Aeromonas hydrophila[3]). Such infections are more likely to occur in people with compromised immune systems.[4]

Historically, Group A streptococcus made up most cases of Type II infections. However, since as early as 2001, another serious form of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis has been observed with increasing frequency,[5] caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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This scares me more than any other disease or plague out there. Something about flesh eating doesn't sound right.

If this was created and it got "loose" then who let it loose?



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver
This scares me more than any other disease or plague out there. Something about flesh eating doesn't sound right.

If this was created and it got "loose" then who let it loose?


I know that this may sound a little bit "out there" but we had an event occur in my neighborhood right before we had a huge MRSA outbreak in our area, which may or may not be connected to the MRSA outbreak that was first reported by the MSM in the northeast Texas area but in fact was happening all the way down here in southeast Texas as well.

Do you recall several years back when the space shuttle burned up on re-entry? There were pieces of it scattered all over eastern Texas, with most of the bigger pieces turning up around Hillister but other pieces landed all over east Texas as well as a few in western Louisiana. Well, we had a piece of it land on the railroad track several blocks down the road from my house. They closed the road on both sides of the tracks and shut down the trains. There were police, fire department, haz-mat team, etc. After a while there were several black vans and white vans- all with no markings and black tinted windows. They flew by so fast we couldn't make out the license plates other than they weren't regular Texas plates. They were down there all day, and the road and tracks didn't re-open until early evening. It never made the news, and the only reason we found out what was going on is because we have a friend who is a police dispatcher.

So anyway, almost immediately (within a few days) of this event people in the area started breaking out with MRSA. At first doctors were saying that it was all spider bites, but after the publicized outbreak in the area in northeast Texas several people went to the local news stations (got to watch some of the neighbor's 5 minutes of fame) and they got a local hospital involved to do tests- it was MRSA. And the worst cases involved people who lived closest to where the shuttle debris landed. Our family got it when a kid spent the night who happens to live within a block of where the debris hit. As it's very contagious it spread all over the area quickly. My best friend worked at a local hospital at the time, and they were overwhelmed with MRSA cases.

Ever since then there has been a lot of speculation whether or not something from the space shuttle debris that caused the original outbreak. We didn't even know what MRSA was when it started; people were told it was spider bites, at least until the MSM jumped all over it when it hit a major city (in this case the media actually brought about some GOOD). I mean, it could be coincidence, but when you have people who haven't left their own yards or had contact with other people breaking out with it you kind of have to wonder. We tend to believe maybe something they were doing medical tests on the shuttle that somehow got loose- my neighbor laughingly calls it "space spiders". All I know is that it was an awful big coincidence, and I don't think we will ever know if it was related or not. The outbreak lasted off and on for about a year or better. I've to this day never seen or known so many people with nasty boils in my whole life!



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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reply to post by TTAA2012
 


LOL
funny retort



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


MRSA has been around for soooo long! I bet anything if I swabbed your nose, it would be positive. It lives in the nares of a host. You can be a carrier and not even know it. Your house could be filled with it living on all surfaces and you are immune. BUT if you wipe your nose and hold onto the grocery cart and some immune compromised person touches it, then wipes a wound on their arm....WHAMMO!!!! Also, MRSA has a few different antibiotics to cure it, but people are worrying now because antibiotics are becoming resistant...

MRSA is easy to test and cure in carriers. Its a swab test up the nose, then 1 week of medication wiped along the inside of your nose. Meanwhile, you chlorox every hard surface in your house. Use Lysol daily on door knobs, drawer handles, light switches chairs...etc.....keep your nails clean and short because it can grow up under your nails.....

The most effective way to prevent MRSA infection is plain ol handwashing. Hand wash hand wash hand wash. You don't even need antibacterial soap. TWENTY SECONDS OF HANDWASHING!!!!!!

And if your out and about, how hard is it to keep a bottle of hand sanitizer in your car or purse? Easy...DO IT!!!!!

EDIT: Yes I too work as an RN and was tested nare positive and then treated. At my hospital we treat staff. Also, I too am far more concerned about hepatitis ABC and HIV than MRSA.
edit on 23-10-2012 by Starwise because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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Working in a hospital I am exposed to MRSA daily. It has been said that 90% of nurses are colonized with MRSA in their nose.

I'm sure going through the experience of an outbreak is scary to most that acquire it in the community (CA-MRSA), however, I think the majority here have blown it way out of proportion. I come home probably covered in MRSA, VRE, C.Diff, Pseudomonas, Candida, etc. on my scrubs and shoes... which translates to being in my car and my apartment. Unless you or someone in your family is immunocompromised (infant, chemo, elderly) you more than likely can fight it off. Most of you probably have it, or have come in contact with it and don't even know it. It's opportunistic and the fact that you showed any signs or symptoms only means you may have more serious health issues that need to be addressed. You can fight the MRSA, but you need to find out WHY your body allowed it to have an outbreak.

The wounds can be painful and irritating as well as embarrassing. In my years of nursing... I have never seen ONE sore on the outside of someone's body due to MRSA. And I work with severely critical ill patients who are prone to infection of all sorts. I have also cared for hundreds of MRSA patients over the years in many settings - from the community, OR, ICU and Labor and Delivery.

Catching MRSA or having a boil erupt on my skin is the last thing on my mind when hugging an MRSA positive patient. I worry much about HIV and worry about Hepatitis even more then that. MRSA will NOT "eat" you skin the same way or rate that Necrotizing Fasciitis will.
None of the above listed diseases would ever keep from hiking in the woods, camping, or doing any of the things I have done in the last three decades of my life.

Just thought I would clear a few things up.





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