MRSA (Flesh Eating Disease) on the Loose

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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MRSA (Flesh Eating Disease) on the Loose


www.the-scientist.com

Wild animals harbor and transmit the most infamous and life-threatening drug-resistant germ, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)…

“[MRSA] can move all over,” epidemiologist and senior author of the study Tara Smith of Iowa told KCRG, a local ABC affiliate in Iowa. “It extends beyond your typical human environment: hospitals, gyms, homes. It can also be in the wild environment,” she added, and “animals can be reservoirs and transmit it to people.”
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Flesh-Eating Disease Bug Common in US Beef, Chicken
Superbug "MRSA" Now Transmitted Sexually
Superbug Epidemic in US - Now Threatening Canada
Beyond Bird Flu: The Perfect Microbial Storm




posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Flesh Eating Disease (MRSA) developed in hospitals and used to be confined there. Then it spread into gyms, locker rooms and homes and became "community-acquired." Then it became a "sexually transmitted disease." Now, it's loose in the world - in wild animals and birds, pets, livestock and dolphins. As the article says, "many scientists speculate that drug-resistant germs from farms or clinics could spread through sewage, water runoff, or trash."

This is scary stuff - I personally know one man who died after getting scratched while travelling and a woman who lost all the flesh on her leg after getting infected at home.



More information about MRSA:

MRSA (Flesh-eating disease)

The initial presentation of MRSA is small red bumps that resemble pimples, spider bites, or boils; they may be accompanied by fever and, occasionally, rashes. Within a few days, the bumps become larger and more painful; they eventually open into deep, pus-filled boils.[3] About 75 percent of community-associated (CA-) MRSA infections are localized to skin and soft tissue and usually can be treated effectively[citation needed]. But some CA-MRSA strains display enhanced virulence, spreading more rapidly and causing illness much more severe than traditional healthcare-associated (HA-) MRSA infections, and they can affect vital organs and lead to widespread infection (sepsis), toxic shock syndrome, and necrotizing ("flesh-eating") pneumonia.

…The most common manifestations of CA-MRSA are skin infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis and pyomyositis (most commonly found in the tropics), necrotizing pneumonia, infective endocarditis (which affects the valves of the heart), and bone and joint infections.[5] CA-MRSA often results in abscess formation that requires incision and drainage.

Also see: PubMed Health: MRSA




www.the-scientist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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Who needs zombies when your flesh can eat itself?

That has to be a horrible disease, it makes me sick just thinking about it.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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That thing sure is scary stuff... I used to think hiking in the woods was OK, not sure about that now...
It's spread all over, not only in the US...

If you want to see an extreme case, search for "Ms Karunawathi"... Be warned, though!



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Sorry, i'm no expert, but i thought that the "flesh eating bug" and "MRSA" were two different things.

Flesh eating bug

MRSA



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 



MRSA is not the flesh eating disease that makes so many headlines. It is dangerous for sure....but it lives on your skin.

The real threat, and flesh eater, is strep. Yup, that same infection that gives you a sore throat. That is where the risk is. MRSA is typically a threat to someone with a decreased immune system. Strep, however, is what has been in the headlines.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Well over 90% of MRSA cases are untreated and unreported. They are skin lesions or boils suffered by people who have hidradenitis suppurativa. At any moment a person with this disease can have a dozen boils, each smelling of rotting flesh and draining a grayish/brownish pus. Or just a simple serosanguinous fluid (clear/amber/orange). This is, in my opinion, grossly undiagnosed in a large portion of people with varying degrees of severity of the disease. Most overweight people have a degree of it.

A majority of those left are suffered by those with severely comprimised immune systems, like nursing home patients. The MRSA infects already sicken tissue (like bed sores).



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:39 PM
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who is MRS A....is she married to MR A



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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We had a battle with MRSA several years back. 3 out of 4 people in the house had it after being unknowingly exposed by a kid that spent the night. MRSA is a variety of staph infection that is VERY contagious and highly resistant to antibiotics. It took almost a year to get rid of it (albeit not permanently because it continues to live in the body and can come back if your immune system gets weak) and it even put my husband in the hospital on I.V. antibiotics. It took numerous rounds of different combinations of medicines to get rid of it, and endless hours upon hours of cleaning and sterilizing every surface in the house, cars, etc.

MRSA is not the same as the flesh eating bacteria, but it is tough and can kill you if it goes untreated.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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6 or 7 years ago in my meth addiction days i noticed that this disease loves a weak immune system.
Many users around me and myself seemed to be a hot spot for legions very similar to a brown recluse bite.
A healthy body most of the time can defeat this.

However do not underestimate the ability of this infection to adapt and try to overcome.

edit on 22-10-2012 by deadeyedick because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 06:16 PM
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I personally have had two bouts with MRSA. The first bout put me in the hospital on IV medications for 3 days and an additional 14 days of oral antibiotics that had some horrendous side effects that I suffered from, the least of which was "dry mouth". I was less than 72 hours into the infection when I was hospitalized, and during treatment my blood pressure "bottomed out" several times due to the medication and I was literally on death's door for the first 48 hours.

The second bout was less than a year later, and put me in the hospital for 2 days on IV medications, and an additional 14 days of oral antibiotics. The second time, the infection spread much quicker, less than 24 hours.

This infection is nothing to play with, and almost always requires hospitalization with IV antibiotics and close medical supervision for anything more than a "surface" or very mild case, and each subsequent infection moves more quickly through the system, and requires a higher dose of IV drugs for each subsequent infection if it occurs within 3 years.

I was told by medical staff, and not widely known or distributed information, that it takes your body 3 years to "recover" from the damage that the antibiotics do to your system.

Contrary to what has been stated here, it does not "only affect people with compromised immune systems". However, they are the ones that are most likely to die from this infection or suffer serious consequences from it in a very short period of time.

Other than advanced arthritis in my hip, I am in good health, and take care of myself. If I had a compromised immune system, I most likely would have died, or lost my arm (first instance) or my foot/leg (second instance).
edit on 10/22/2012 by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh because: add



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by scarybear
That thing sure is scary stuff... I used to think hiking in the woods was OK, not sure about that now...
It's spread all over, not only in the US...

If you want to see an extreme case, search for "Ms Karunawathi"... Be warned, though!




I think that their is more danger catching it from a human than hiking in the woods.
More than likely a human that has been dealing with it would carry a mutation that is more potent than what is found just about everywhere in nature.

It is EVERYWHERE.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by littled16
 


Flesh eating disease is caused by the same bacteria as MRSA, specifically Group A streptococcus.

Group A Streptococcus:

Staphylococcus aureus
Clostridium perfringens
Bacteroides fragilis
Aeromonas hydrophila

The difference between MRSA and Necrotizing Fasciitis (Flesh eating disease) is that the Staphyloccoccus aureus bacteria in MRSA is "antibiotic resistant", thus it's name Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh
reply to post by littled16
 


Flesh eating disease is caused by the same bacteria as MRSA, specifically Group A streptococcus.

Group A Streptococcus:

Staphylococcus aureus
Clostridium perfringens
Bacteroides fragilis
Aeromonas hydrophila

The difference between MRSA and Necrotizing Fasciitis (Flesh eating disease) is that the Staphyloccoccus aureus bacteria in MRSA is "antibiotic resistant", thus it's name Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.


Strep and Staph are two completely different entities. Staph is a bug that has this hard golden shell (hence the "aureous" in its name) that prevents efficacy in many common antibiotics as a treatment.

Strep is a completely different animal GAS, or Group A Strep, cause all manner of illnesses like impetigo, meningitis (the very deadly bacterial form), and sinusitus (very common in the same time of year as strep throat).

They are not the same. They are similar int he same way that cats and dogs are similar. But two completely different bugs that cause two completely different sets of disease process.

ETA: MRSA= Methicillin Resistant Staphococcous Aureous. Not Streptococcous. There are not many drug resistent straints of strep, thank god. It is quite a nasty bug.
edit on 22-10-2012 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I stand corrected. Thank you for pointing it out! I didn't even notice the staph and strep when I was typing it.

Now I feel dumb


Either way, MRSA or Flesh eating disease...nasty stuff.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:39 PM
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MRSA might be resistant to Methicillian, but it does respond to... silver. I know of two cases where MRSA was cured with 22ppm silver gel. I was one of them. I got it after slamming my elbow on a counter. My elbow was the size of a tennis ball by that night. Then the red, swollen tissue began it's march down and up my arm. I, being nurse, immediatly started Rocephin IM. It just kept getting worse. I was REALLY worried, Iknew I could lose me arm!
So, my wife went to the health food store and asked the guy what to do. He sold her some silver, and told her the story of another guy who was in the hospital and the silver cured him. So I trieed it. 12 hours later, the redness and swelling was 50% gone. In three days, totally gone. All I did was rub it in wice a day.
I also have seen studies that show that MRSA can't live on silver surfaces. Some toilets are impregnated with silver as well.
I'm never without a tube of silver around the house now.
And the big upside is MRSA doesn't get resistant to silver.
The medical establishment is starting to cathc on. In my practice I've seen honey and coconut oil impregnated wound dressings.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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Originally posted by davjan4
MRSA might be resistant to Methicillian, but it does respond to... silver. I know of two cases where MRSA was cured with 22ppm silver gel. I was one of them. I got it after slamming my elbow on a counter. My elbow was the size of a tennis ball by that night. Then the red, swollen tissue began it's march down and up my arm. I, being nurse, immediatly started Rocephin IM. It just kept getting worse. I was REALLY worried, Iknew I could lose me arm!
So, my wife went to the health food store and asked the guy what to do. He sold her some silver, and told her the story of another guy who was in the hospital and the silver cured him. So I trieed it. 12 hours later, the redness and swelling was 50% gone. In three days, totally gone. All I did was rub it in wice a day.
I also have seen studies that show that MRSA can't live on silver surfaces. Some toilets are impregnated with silver as well.
I'm never without a tube of silver around the house now.
And the big upside is MRSA doesn't get resistant to silver.
The medical establishment is starting to cathc on. In my practice I've seen honey and coconut oil impregnated wound dressings.


This lady i know, and personally despise, is probably the best nurse I have ever met. Especially as a gerontological nurse. She swore by Silvadene cream on wound care for her elderly patients. Sometimes it goes by the name Thermazene. It is expensive as hell, but it is a great, great wound curing agent (instant relief for diaper rash). She said "it helps with epithelialization of the skin cells", whatever that means. I CAN say that it was the best wound care medication I have ever seen, especially on the MRSA infected decubitis.

I don't believe in colloidol silver But I do belief in silver sulfadiazene.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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Apply oregano oil to boils and take internally for a week.

Problem solved.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


A bit of fear mongering on the OP's part;


Though most MRSA infections aren't serious, some can be life-threatening. Many public health experts are alarmed by the spread of tough strains of MRSA. Because it's hard to treat, MRSA is sometimes called a "super bug."


www.webmd.com...

I don't want either MRSA or "flesh eating disease" but OP was misleading.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan

Originally posted by davjan4
MRSA might be resistant to Methicillian, but it does respond to... silver. I know of two cases where MRSA was cured with 22ppm silver gel. I was one of them. I got it after slamming my elbow on a counter. My elbow was the size of a tennis ball by that night. Then the red, swollen tissue began it's march down and up my arm. I, being nurse, immediatly started Rocephin IM. It just kept getting worse. I was REALLY worried, Iknew I could lose me arm!
So, my wife went to the health food store and asked the guy what to do. He sold her some silver, and told her the story of another guy who was in the hospital and the silver cured him. So I trieed it. 12 hours later, the redness and swelling was 50% gone. In three days, totally gone. All I did was rub it in wice a day.
I also have seen studies that show that MRSA can't live on silver surfaces. Some toilets are impregnated with silver as well.
I'm never without a tube of silver around the house now.
And the big upside is MRSA doesn't get resistant to silver.
The medical establishment is starting to cathc on. In my practice I've seen honey and coconut oil impregnated wound dressings.


This lady i know, and personally despise, is probably the best nurse I have ever met. Especially as a gerontological nurse. She swore by Silvadene cream on wound care for her elderly patients. Sometimes it goes by the name Thermazene. It is expensive as hell, but it is a great, great wound curing agent (instant relief for diaper rash). She said "it helps with epithelialization of the skin cells", whatever that means. I CAN say that it was the best wound care medication I have ever seen, especially on the MRSA infected decubitis.

I don't believe in colloidol silver But I do belief in silver sulfadiazene.


Silvadene cream is typically used in burn wounds. We also used it in surgical dressings. No matter the form though. Colloidal silver, 22ppm silver gel suspended in aloe, silvadene... it's the silver that does it. There just needs to be enough of it, and I foudn the 22ppm (parts per million) worked well.





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