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Where should new archaeological research be directed

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posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by isyeye
I would like to see more exploration done just off the shorelines of our world's oceans. There's a lot of ancient history waiting to be discovered underneath the water. Over the years we've begun to understand how ancient civilizations often sprung up around the shorelines, and as the water tables rose, they would move inland.

There's no telling what may be uncovered one day beneath the waters of our world.


I am actually in this field of study and am currently completing my degree at university. Every year there are leaps and bounds in the technology required to make this more feasible. There is a possibility of finding older sites than what we know now to be the beginnings of civilization.




posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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I'm going to go with the Chinese pyramids. There is evidently some information being suppressed in those pyramids.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Have some Celtic plaid experts look at the plaid dug up along the silk road in China and get their ideas about it. I saw a show about thios and not once did they mention that plaid design is communicative and not just a bunch of lines. Rank and position, office in the tribe can be told just by looking at the plaid.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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anyplace war is happening, and has happened for an eternity.

and even then, don't disregard the results and the control we see today, for it is all foretold and a backstory, at the same time....



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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I think the first thing that should be done is to illustrate the reasons why archaeology is important and relevant to contemporary issues and society at large. Much of the population sees archaeology as just being an interesting hobby, rather than a legitimate occupation. This is of course an incorrect assumption.

It's not hard to understand why though. While archaeological finds are exciting to us and interesting to the public (well some of the public), many political decision makers and organizations are skeptical as to why they should fund or care about archaeological expeditions (unless they have something to gain from it politically or ideologically).

I like to use the analogy of psychiatry to archaeology. A psychiatrist psychoanalyzes a person in order to establish the current issue, how the current issue arose, and what can be done to correct the issue. In the same way, an archaeologist looks at the contemporary issues of a geographical location like a city, state, or nation, and digs into the past of that place to understand the unique pathways of communication, power, and transportation that have been molded by the cultural influences that have history there. Once understood, an archaeologist can work in collaboration with other planners and decision making organizations to correct an issue or at least suggest where corrections can be made.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:14 PM
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Originally posted by angryhulk
reply to post by isyeye
 


Agreed.

95% of the worlds oceans remain unexplored... Don't quote me on that but I'm sure I heard it somewhere...


If you mean to an archaeological level then it would be 99.999~% but then much less than .001% of the land area has been surveyed and excavated too

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reply to post by MonkeyFishFrog
 


Excellent, best of luck, if you need inspiration try to see the Vasa and the Kyrenia ship museums - impressive what the archaeologists were able to do with the technology of that day

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reply to post by Logarock
 


Why don't you post an image of the kilt
edit on 23/10/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:31 PM
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Originally posted by abaeterno
I think the first thing that should be done is to illustrate the reasons why archaeology is important and relevant to contemporary issues and society at large. Much of the population sees archaeology as just being an interesting hobby, rather than a legitimate occupation. This is of course an incorrect assumption.

It's not hard to understand why though. While archaeological finds are exciting to us and interesting to the public (well some of the public), many political decision makers and organizations are skeptical as to why they should fund or care about archaeological expeditions (unless they have something to gain from it politically or ideologically).

I like to use the analogy of psychiatry to archaeology. A psychiatrist psychoanalyzes a person in order to establish the current issue, how the current issue arose, and what can be done to correct the issue. In the same way, an archaeologist looks at the contemporary issues of a geographical location like a city, state, or nation, and digs into the past of that place to understand the unique pathways of communication, power, and transportation that have been molded by the cultural influences that have history there. Once understood, an archaeologist can work in collaboration with other planners and decision making organizations to correct an issue or at least suggest where corrections can be made.


Well,some of us are curious,just like some are curious about ufo's and bigfoot.
That is the lot you get here,but not many in other places or in the common crowd.
In the general populous,they don't give a hoot.
It's only those that are interested in history and such,which seems to be alot less than it use to be.
I understand why these sciences are important,and I believe that sometimes these scientists have blinders on.
They need to broaden they're spectrum of understanding and learning.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Here is my families kilt,don't know why I'm posting it.......




The Doyle's & McDowell's are descendants of the Vikings, who settled along the seacoast in pre-Norman times; and in fact the Doyle's are and were always more numerous in areas adjacent to the sea coast, which tends to confirm this view. DubhGall, it may be mentioned, is the word used in early times to denote a Norseman or a Scandinavian. One authority, however, Rev. John Francis Shearman, asserts that the eponymous ancestor of the east Leinster Doyles was DubhGilla (a Norseman), son of Bruadar, King of Idrone (county Carlow), in the year 851. DubhGhall son of Amhlaibh (=Olaf), Prince of Leinster, was slain at the Battle of Clontarf, and Eoghan O DubhGaill is recorded in Waterford in 1291.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982

Well,some of us are curious,just like some are curious about ufo's and bigfoot.
That is the lot you get here,but not many in other places or in the common crowd.
In the general populous,they don't give a hoot.
It's only those that are interested in history and such,which seems to be alot less than it use to be.
I understand why these sciences are important,and I believe that sometimes these scientists have blinders on.
They need to broaden they're spectrum of understanding and learning.


Howdy Kdog

If the 'big boys' won't study a subject to the degree you want, do it yourself or hire people to do it. Its been done before. The organization that grew out of Cayce's business funded a number of studies in Egypt.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Well,you did ask for our opinion,didn't you?

BTW: this is the part that you are being an ass and you should show a little consideration.

edit on 23-10-2012 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by kdog1982
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Well,you did ask for our opinion,didn't you?

BTW: this is the part that you are being an ass and you should show a little consideration.


Yes I did and my suggestion was in ernest, my apologies if you deemed it annoying



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:32 AM
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I would like to see people, especially school age kids encouraged to utilize Google Earth to search out anomalies and areas of interest that deserve additional investigation. Big companies like Google could give prizes to them for discoveries. National Geographic or PBS could do spin off reality series. It would be a way of engaging our youth in exploration!



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I would like to do more work on the Trans-Pecos rock art. Hopefully after July 2013 I will have the time to visit Shumla and make some contacts and start doing some geomapping (if they haven't done this already.) Wish I could get into Mexico safely to look over some of this material.

I'm particularly interested in palimpsest-style rock art and whether the underlying figures were simply ignored or whether they were used or modified.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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Hmmm, red haired, Caucasian mummies in china wearing kilts....Celtic perhaps!
edit on 24-10-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by LUXUS


Hmmm, red haired, Caucasian mummies in china wearing kilts....Celtic perhaps!
edit on 24-10-2012 by LUXUS because: (no reason given)

Yes
they represent the eastern most frontier of the Celtic people.
They were out there for trade with the ancient Chinese kingdoms.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


One thing I would like to know more about, locally, are the petroglyphs on the south bluffs of the San Joaquin river within the city of fresno. They are litttle know nothing has been written about them as far as I know.
I stumbled across them while fishing as a teen.
Otherwise I'd like to see more work done on very early human or prehuman expansion into the new world .



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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Eastern and southern Anatolia. They just keep finding the most interesting stuff there!

But also, there was a discovery about a year or so ago in South America. I want to say Peru, but I am not sure. It was textiles that dated back about 12 to 14,000 years. I found this remarkable because this would insinuate that the immigrants coming across the Bering straits would have cut a straight bee line for this region to even get close to this time line. I would like to know more about this and the timeline.
edit on 10/24/2012 by Jeremiah65 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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Id love Jersey Channel Island's to be looked at more we have so much over here i wont post loads of links about it


Neolithic Man Originally part of the mainland, the islands were formed after the Ice Age around 8000 BC. Jersey like the other Channel Islands, is steeped in history and discoveries in the 20th century have shown evidence of mankind dating back to 4000 BC (New Stone Age) when tribes, possibly from Spain moved here. Although most traces of ancient tombstones have been broken up in centuries gone by, the most famous of the remaining is at La Hougue Bie. These first inhabitants were probably a small dark pre-Celtic race and were later followed by fair haired Gauls. See Ancient Monuments for more details.



www.islandlife.org...



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Jeremiah65
Eastern and southern Anatolia. They just keep finding the most interesting stuff there!

But also, there was a discovery about a year or so ago in South America. I want to say Peru, but I am not sure. It was textiles that dated back about 12 to 14,000 years. I found this remarkable because this would insinuate that the immigrants coming across the Bering straits would have cut a straight bee line for this region to even get close to this time line. I would like to know more about this and the timeline.


If they came down the coast by boat then the time line makes more sense. I'd agree with you that Turkey - well all of Asia Minor actually- is the key point of earth to find out about how the main sequence began for civilization. Unfortunately since we started getting interested in that part of the world cultural barriers and wars have made the area difficult to systematically study - I remember driving from Iskenderum to Batman, Turkey (yes there is a town called Batman in Turkey) and noting the tells that showed up every few kilometers.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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Really its quite simple, the small guy who might have found something top dogs don't care about! Seems to me if they did not find it it is of no value. Most get blown off and become forgotten, thrown away as nothing but sediment, or another plain explaination.
Really there should be a open place to bring things to to be looked at really. Not some school/collage that wants braging points. People outside the mainstream who want to look, explore and see things for what they are!






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