Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada

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posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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While refreshing my self with the glooscap legends I found this ,

After the earthquake,the old temple was claimed by the Penobscot,being previously on the Passamaquoddy side of the river. The "king" of the Penobscot turned it into a royal castle. They changed its name to Norumbega, being previously called Temple of Umglebemu. The Penobscots called the defeated Amphibian God "Kei Checqwalis".The mountainitselfis todayis calledMt. Tuck. Part of it (northeast side) is called Ft. Knox. Anotherinteresting feature is the "GondolaCove" in Sandy Point. Early Italian explorers supposedly once saw a ships prow sticking out of the mud during a spring ice-out. They described it like a gondola they had seen in Venice (Viking Longboat?).


Hmmmm
The source

en.m.wikipedia.org...




posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


I read that that disease may have come up from down south and possibly have been introduced by the Spanish conquistador or explorer that came before Columbus. I guess the Spanish carry diseases that don't effect them at all. It may have been smallpox or something like that. This is also still evident with what happened in Haiti with the soldiers recently.
edit on 23-10-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


well its nice to know that there are stoops like you out there to justify why stuff is that should not be!
don't worry,jesus is coming back to save you,and satan put dinosaur bones on earth to test your faith!
thank 'god' for columbus,lest america (oops barbados) would not have been (re)found.
gee,i didn't know it was lost!



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:24 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by rickymouse
 


Very interesting stuff rickymouse, the time frame for the introduction of a posssible norse component I find very interesting. I read an article by an anthropologist that stated there was large depopulation event amongst related tribes along the southeastern great lakes region into the upper Hudson river valley in the 12th-13th century
The only analogous event was European introduced disease from much later.


That sounds interesting, what evidence do they have to base that theory on?



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by reficul
reply to post by Hanslune
 


well its nice to know that there are stoops like you out there to justify why stuff is that should not be!
don't worry,jesus is coming back to save you,and satan put dinosaur bones on earth to test your faith!
thank 'god' for columbus,lest america (oops barbados) would not have been (re)found.
gee,i didn't know it was lost!


Howdy reficul

No you seem to only be interested in one side of the debate, the items you mention have mundane answers to them.

What will you do if JC doesn't come back? People have been waiting for that carpenter to show up for his next appointment for about 70 generations........

~wink



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by reficul
reply to post by Hanslune
 

don't worry,jesus is coming back to save you,and satan put dinosaur bones on earth to test your faith!



You're being sarcastic, right? You don't really believe this?

(please say no)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan

Originally posted by reficul
reply to post by Hanslune
 

don't worry,jesus is coming back to save you,and satan put dinosaur bones on earth to test your faith!



You're being sarcastic, right? You don't really believe this?

(please say no)


Statements of extreme conservatism often sound like a parody!



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 



"Viking", as we generally consider it, was actually an era that was fairly short lived. The marauding and fearsome Scandinavian merchant-warrior (to use both terms loosely) is well remembered, but would the invasive viking have been here searching for loot?

That is interesting to consider. I am not familiar with the Atlantic Coast tribes and their lore. I could imagine that the smaller and less formal settlements of the tirbal culture would lend itself to being more easily eliminated by bands of viking marauders. Like, wipe out an entire group in an attack. Being fearsome enough to have been etched deep enough in our memory to still be commonly talked about today, I would expect that they would have left some sort of an impression on the local indians should they have interacted with them.
edit on 24-10-2012 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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Interesting thread, and I am not surprised at all, there is way too much we don't know, but I'll keep posted. Thank you!

dubz



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I am not sold on the idea, however I do believe there are several interesting sites that have KT symbols. I am not really a fan of the KT and Columbus connection, but the KT using Viking routes to reach America (where they met their demise through war or assimilation) I still find fascinating and believable. Thanks for the thread, I love these kinds of findings as they are so rare, and so hard to prove.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:04 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


of coarse i was joking about JC and dino bones!!!! and as for atlantic tribes go,the mic mac indians of nova scotia have tales of a white skinned traveler who spent some time with them. his name was 'glooscap'.
some say it was henri sinclair, from the orkney isles in northern scotland.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by reficul
 


The Indian legends hold him to be a creator and leader. Where does the 'white traveller' come in, or are you joking again?



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by rickymouse
 


Very interesting stuff rickymouse, the time frame for the introduction of a posssible norse component I find very interesting. I read an article by an anthropologist that stated there was large depopulation event amongst related tribes along the southeastern great lakes region into the upper Hudson river valley in the 12th-13th century
The only analogous event was European introduced disease from much later.


That sounds interesting, what evidence do they have to base that theory on?

Hi Hans,
I spent several hrs last night trying to track that article down, but couldn't find it.
The anthropologist was studying one of the groups of tribes in the upstate area, and found abandoned vilages
and seasonal sites that had a period of non occupation. There weren't signs of wafare, just a lack of people. If I remember correctly it was about the time that agriculture was introduced and the same time that these tribes "confederated". The tribe also has " law giver" legend about an individual who brings them new ways of living , like giving up thier cannibal ways.
That's actually how I found the article, I was reading on " law giver" legends of the north east Indians and it was a referenced and linked article.
Her supposition was that a new disease was introduced from the outside,,but there was only limited exposure among the native americans, as the surrounding tribes don't have a depopulation event at that time. So she figured it was virulent and had a high mortality rate and it killed the hosts before they could travel very far.
It kinda fits with what rickymouse said about a new disease from the south, which was the direction agriculture moved in from.
It was a fascinating read.
edit on 24-10-2012 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 12:40 PM
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Fascinating subject, well worthy of further investigation and discussion I reckon.

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the 2007 movie "Pathfinder" yet?

LINK TO WIKI INFO ON PATHFINDER MOVIE

Though historically....erm... questionable! It does depict vikings arriving in the new world, and the native Americans attempts at repulsing them. It's quite a violent film, but the action sequences are great, and the conflict and contrast between the two cultures makes for a good watch.

I have it on DVD, but I'm sure you'll be able to download it somewhere?

Anyway, I'd love to hear more about the TRUE early explorers of the Americas!

GTD



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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Maybe these Vikings are responsible for that giant rune rock in Minnesota all those years ago?

Who knows...



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Along with your story, I have often wondered What is this?.

I am sure it is something simple and not old, but I wonder. I found a number of similar sites in the eastern sea areas of Canada.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by straddlebug
 


No idea



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Howdy Punkinworks

Well there were some nasty diseases in the new world before the westerners showed up; so it could have been that, even a flu that had developed in say the Yucatan could have been deadly to those to the north, or it could have been a 'insert' from the west, or just a mis-remembering of the later plagues that swept the area. The new world wasn't disease free, I believe four diseases were notable in the new world, bejel, chagas disease, pinta and syphilis



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Hanslune
 



My thoughts:

Christopher Columbus was a northern European. I can buy that he was Scottish. Regardless, I believe that he, or his family, hailed from the northern regions. As well, he was a nobleman from these northern regions.

I believe that the northern people knew of the New World, and had for generations. And Christopher Columbus was just following through on knowledge he had from his northern roots. I would be surprised if the Spanish royals didn't already know, too. Or, at least to the extent they cared to (the knowledge is abstract, of little use to them at the time, until they were ready to monetize the knowledge).


No Columbus was genoese, but he had access to scandanavian nautical knowledge. He made a trip to Iceland in 1475, and his father in law was a ships master with the knights of Christ, in Portugal.
The knights of Christ were the remnants of the templars in Portugal.
Did you notice that Columbus' sails flew the standard of Templars, red cross,on a white field.

There is circumstantial evidence that the Portugese reached the new world as early as the 1470's
, when the Spanish got to Brazil in the early 1500's there were already Portugese sugar plantations on a fee offshore islands.
The Portugese crown did its best to keep knowledge of its newly discovered lands from it trade competitors, the Italian city states and the Spanish. Many of the early expeditions' information and charts were seen as a state secret and were kept very secret.
And seeing how it was from iceland that the scandanavians jumped off for the new world, it is very plausible that he could have gained knowledge from them about the new world.
Clearly the scandanavians had much more contact with the new world than just the failed out post
L'anse aux meadow and the newly discovered site, but those sites were just seasonal camps used for lumbering and fishing and would have left very little trace. But they did leave traces that aren't fully accepted yet.
One thing most people don't understand is that the Viking period ends when two things happen, the first is the fuedalizing of scandanavia society, by the new monarchies in Denmark and Sweden, then christianization.

Another thing people don't think about the place in society that many of the earlier explorers had, they were mostly outcasts, forced to leave home because of being banished for crimes or fueds with other clans in the tribe.
When they settled Iceland and greenland it was as much to get away from everyone else as it was about exploration. And by the time the mainland was fully christianized the outlying settlments were stubornly hanging on to their pagan ways.
So there was an impetus to keep the knowledge of new lands from the church and crown. Also these people didn't appreciate the kings, whom they had no real connection with, forcing them to pay taxes on thier goods they worked so hard to export to the mainland.
There are even records of ships full of lumber from the new world being taxed in danish ports, lumber that had to have come from much farther south than is the currently accepted limit of scandanavian exploration.





but we can't tell people the truth...Columbus and Verrazno both templars..both who's job was to set up the new atlantis in a more formal network connected to europe.

west indies by design, newport by design..connected by the Golden Triangle of trading slaves, rum, etc back and forth

most people still don't know columbus was related via marriage to the Scotish/Norman Sinclair family ...



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by SuperTripps
 


Sure you can but why tell them things that are fabrications or unevidenced conspiracy theories?





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