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Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:53 PM
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Excellent.

Baffin Island is stunning. Now I have a good reason to go and have a look around.




posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by reficul
 


why is there a round house in newport that is of totaly european style that shouldn't be there.

you live on east coast ri/ma?
not many people know of that(unless maybe you take a tour or something), i went to school down there, the sun actually does go through the little window at top of the circle structure during certain times of the year. living in newport/middletown for 7 years, we explored a bunch more in places regular people shouldnt go, theres tons of building on some of the old mansions and farms along the shores that dont look like they belong there. but you have to go down many dirt roads that say, do not enter ^^ and some bring you to the navy base, BAD DO NOT GO DOWN THAT ONE heh.

forgot to add, its not really a house looking struture, it has about 6 stilts and a round top with a window that sun goes through at certain times of year. the whole struture is round in nature.
edit on 22-10-2012 by ~widowmaker~ because: add
edit on 22-10-2012 by ~widowmaker~ because: sp



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:10 PM
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The Lenope indians are thought to be possibly Old Norse coming across the ice to Canada from a Viking settlement in Greenland and then traveled down to Minnesota where they split up. They were trying to get to a place where they had other vikings I guess. I think that was about 1200 AD if I remember right. I know a guy who understands Old Norse and he can talk to the Lenope in their native language. The words are run together though. Technically they were viking settlers.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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Thanks for posting this!

I am fan of history---and have also traveled to Newfoundland, not common in the tourism industry in which I work. In New England, too, there is talk of the Vikings having stopped in Cape Cod on the tip in Provincetown. There are supposedly Viking artifacts that have been discovered there in the past.(Cape Cod ossuary, I believe the artiifacts are called.)

I think there is good evidence that the Vikings traveled west--and came across the New World--traded and stayed for a time.

We know they were in Greenland, or at least the diaries of Leif Erikkson might point to this.

Many people in New England believe the Norsemen were there:


The Boston area is graced with not just one, but three public monuments commemorating Leif's visit to the area. One of these monuments marks the precise location of Leif's house in Cambridge, near the banks of the Charles River. How do we know the location of Leif's travels so precisely?


source: www.hurstwic.org...
edit on 23-10-2012 by MRuss because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 04:23 AM
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reply to post by CosmicEgg
 


The Vikings were from Scandinavia:
Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
edit on 23-10-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Fascinating stuff Hans

More sites will be found I'm sure
But like has been said they left a pretty light footprint that will be hard to find.
I bet that ant good sites further south would have been reoccupied by subsequent settlement and are buried underneath modern cities in many cases.


Most probably, a friend of mine has spent 45+ years looking for signs of Vikings in New England, if they were there their site was probably built over.

I'll speculate that their might be another site along the St Lawrence and perhaps a lumber camp in Labrador - somewhere too. Wood was needed in Greenland and Labrador had lots
edit on 22/10/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)


A little off topic, but what does your friend think of the Knights Templar providing Colombus with navigation details to the New World, and the Knights themselves having "disappeared" there following Viking/Scandanavian trade routes? There are many New England sites with a possible connection to the Knights, such as the Newport Tower.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:08 AM
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Originally posted by violet
reply to post by CosmicEgg
 


The Vikings were from Scandinavia:
Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
edit on 23-10-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)


You're seriously telling me that? I live in northern Europe. Jeez....



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:11 AM
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Originally posted by violet
reply to post by CosmicEgg
 


The Vikings were from Scandinavia:
Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
edit on 23-10-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)


Yes they were. However, Greenland and Iceland were settled by Norse vikings and thus were technically subjects of the Kings of Norway.

Interestingly enough, the Landnamabok (Icelandic Book of Settlement) talks about how Iceland was originally settled by Irish monks, before the Norse ever got there.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:22 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks for posting this Hans. As you know, a subject that totally fascinates me.


These sites appear to be similar to L'Anse Aux Meadowes in that they appear to be seasonal / occasional camps rather than the whopping great permanent settlement we all hope to find evidence for! The evidence of trade isn't surprising either. In fact, that is exactly what i would expect to find, to be honest. The image of the marauding Viking warrior, whilst correct, was also far removed from 90% of Viking life. Look at the extensive trade networks set up around the "world" of that era. Look at the attempts by Cnut for fiscal parity with the Byzantine Empire - Europe's first attempt at monetary policy!

In point of fact, England was targeted specifically because of the wealth there. Whilst Denmark and Norway had around 3 mints each, there were over 70 in England as well as the worlds most advanced tax system. Whilst that appear off topic to some, it is actually completely relevent in the sense that it is further evidence of the lengths the Vikings would go to for securing trade rights and fiscal policy. Trade with Native Americans is inevitable when you stop to think about it.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:16 AM
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Quechua language and Amayara has similarities to finnish, finnish is one of the oldest languages in Europe if not oldest when Norwegian is quite young language, There similar grammar and place forms in both Quechua and finnish , even alphabets are pronounced in same way and there are words which are same and means same things in both languages. We all know languages changes by time but grammar in modern finnish has not changed from the ancient finnish.
Here is some alphabets which as pronounced same starts at 1:28

and finnish alphabets


I believe history is not even close to being right.. there are more questions than answers. Vikings and Scandinavians most likely were in South America before other Europeans but still there is lot information in shadows we are not aware about.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:18 AM
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reply to post by ~widowmaker~
 


well the natives of the time were not making any structure like that,and it is said that 'it has always been there'!
the stone work is of european style masonary.


The Newport Tower (also known as: Round Tower, Touro Tower, Newport Stone Tower and Old Stone Mill) is a round stone tower located in Touro Park in Newport, Rhode Island (USA). It is commonly considered to have been a windmill built in the mid-17th century. However, the tower has received attention due to speculation that it is actually several centuries older and represents evidence of pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by Blue Shift
Ah, the Indiana Jones-like thrills and glory of archeology. Otherwise known as lying in a cold square hole in the ground, slowly using a paint brush to loosen the dirt from a piece of broken pottery.
And?

You make that sound like a bad thing! Actually, now I really regret not going to that CNEHA conference, aside from the fact that this year it was held in one of my very favorite places. Now this info is not exactly new, but it is nice to see it hit the media again. It makes sense that there are Norse sites on Baffin Island, given its proximity to Greenland. And it also makes sense that there would be sites south of L'Anse aux Meadows, as a butternut was found there...way too far north. As I've said, scuttlebutt around Red Bay, Labrador, is that they figure the Basques very likely predated Columbus as well, but right now that's conjecture awaiting definitive proof.

I'm currently reading Deacon's Madoc and the Discovery of America. It was written in 1966, when the discovery of L'Anse aux Meadows was still fresh news, and it carefully builds a case for the Welsh having arrived in 1170. Again, not finished but I anticipate applying his arguments to what we now know some 45-odd years later. It is clear that our picture of 'Who Discovered America' (including First Nations) is rapidly changing, which only adds to its fascination.

Thanks for the thread...S&F4U!



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by ZeroKnowledge
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thank you for those links, never read it before. Vikings and Indians certainly met ,there was certainly a trade involved and indeed Indians wanted to buy weapons and were refused. But i would not call them partners due to clear mention of hostilities.
Of course article speaks about different location so everything is possible.
Lots of info and i did not read the text from second link yet - too long.


Considering Native American and Norse cultural and historical trends - conflict was inevitable between the two, however I suspect trade did take place and their is evidence for it. Due to the small populations they probably learned to avoid one another

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Originally posted by auto73912621
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Go look for the georgia stones!


Er why?

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reply to post by Flavian
 


Yeah it appears they were using North America for resources - the skaeling made, along with the Norse with limited population and only a small technological advantage in weaponry, a place they wouldn't wanted to have settled in - AFAWK

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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


Hey that right in your neighborhood. Let me know what you think of the Madoc book, I read it a long time ago and don't recall much of what it said other than the conclusion
edit on 23/10/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by jude11
But according to America, Columbus is still the hero of discovery with regards to North America.. Columbus day is a National holiday that should be repealed and abolished for the sham that it truly is.

Because we all know that this is nothing but a glorified piece of non history.

1492...Yeah, right.


Peace


Nah just refashion it as a celebration of a joining of the world and a remembrance of the loss to Native Americans



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
The Lenope indians are thought to be possibly Old Norse coming across the ice to Canada from a Viking settlement in Greenland and then traveled down to Minnesota where they split up. They were trying to get to a place where they had other vikings I guess. I think that was about 1200 AD if I remember right. I know a guy who understands Old Norse and he can talk to the Lenope in their native language. The words are run together though. Technically they were viking settlers.


I think you mean Lenape also called the Delaware Indians? You sure your friend isn't speaking Unalachtigo or Unami?

You might want to start a separate thread on the Lenape having a Norse component



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 





A little off topic, but what does your friend think of the Knights Templar providing Colombus with navigation details to the New World, and the Knights themselves having "disappeared" there following Viking/Scandanavian trade routes? There are many New England sites with a possible connection to the Knights, such as the Newport Tower.


I believe his term for that was #$@&$ baloney for the first (he was redleg Marine), as for the Newport tower, Colonially built. He didn't discount that someone else might have gotten to the East coast of America, just that they left no trace, and if they did try to settle were wiped out by or incorporated into the Indians living there, as did a number of the earlier known explorers - except the Norse
edit on 23/10/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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Originally posted by reficul
they dig up white guys in michigan that are way too old to be there
they dig up white guys wearing plaid and have red and blonde beards in china,that shouldn't be there.
they find chinese anchkors off the coast of california that shouldn't be there
there are huge heads made of stone found in mexico,many of them representing races of men that don't belong there!
what part of 'the historians are lying to us' don't you get?!
explain where the people of jonestown went.(ya pocahantis stuff)
why is there a round house in newport that is of totaly european style that shouldn't be there.
why is there an effigy of a fallen templar knite chiseled in stone on a hill side on westford ledge?
it shouldn't be there!
peris reis map shouldn't exist!
need i say more!?


Oh my a lot of silly stuff; okay sure the Piri Reis map should exist it just doesn't show what Hapgood made up about it!

I think you meant Roanoke

New Port tower - Colonial

Nothing unusual about white guys in Asia

Chinese anchors from Chinese fisherman who came over in the 19th century

Etc

Try doing some research

...oh and why would all the historian in the world lie to you? Are you important or something?



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


I have literature on this Lanope stuff somewhere. I've listened to two lectures on the Lenope Indians, one last year and one this. There are people researching this along with the Indians that spoke Old English somewhere in Virginia I think. The evidence of the old English speaking Indians is in the historical records from the around the time of the original colonization of the United States. The Indians were speaking old English and were frustrated with the English for not understanding them. Someone knew Old English and worked things out. I belong to the Ancient Artifact Preservation Society. They have members and speakers, some well known and fully accredited, that meet for a long weekend each year. My granddaughter got to work watching the table for a guy who finds ship wrecks. They have found a lot of treasures, he has a big museum of his own.

Yeah, I can't spell worth a damn. I memorize sequences and theories by translating them into my own style. Can't remember people's names well either. I have no interest in spelling or names. I can recognize faces and can recall information well from conversations.
edit on 23-10-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by Hanslune
 


I have literature on this Lanope stuff somewhere. I've listened to two lectures on the Lenope Indians, one last year and one this. Yeah, I can't spell worth a damn. I memorize sequences and theories by translating them into my own style. Can't remember people's names well either. I have no interest in spelling or names. I can recognize faces and can recall information well from conversations



Well my spelling and grammar is terrible too, that's why I married an English teacher. If you find the Lenape stuff start up a thread, I appreciate it



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Very interesting stuff rickymouse, the time frame for the introduction of a posssible norse component I find very interesting. I read an article by an anthropologist that stated there was large depopulation event amongst related tribes along the southeastern great lakes region into the upper Hudson river valley in the 12th-13th century
The only analogous event was European introduced disease from much later.





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