Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

my biggest secret about the pineal gland...

page: 1
97
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
+49 more 
posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:21 PM
link   
So,

I want to share with you all a secret that I have jealously kept to my self. It has to do with the pineal gland and brain development in general.

Have you ever yawned and noticed the pressure in your head? The rush of blood you can literally hear through your sinuses. Well those muscles in your head are not just involuntary. You can learn to control that flow of blood into your brain.

I once was a kid very involved in strange mental practices. I see it as normal, even natural but have been told it is not. I don't know. I think our bodies have secrets to them we must develop that are not inherently expressed.

So. If you are up for the challenge here we go. You start by trying to get a small rush of blood. It might help to open your mouth and get a feel for the muscles I am talking about. It is not necesary but you need identify the muscles first so you can focus on them. They draw the blood from your neck pass it by your temples through the opening under your ear in your skull. This blood then flows to the front of your skull and IMO then directly into your pineal gland.

The first try's are hard. Really hard. You might feel like your head will explode or you will go insane before achieving the first "pump" of blood. Think of it like learning to move a toe after you suffer nerve damage. Like rehabilitation. Take it slow and steady. That is the trick.

Once you have identified the muscles focus on getting a single rush, if you can think to it next time you yawn do.

So you know what I mean and are trying to flex them. Once you get the first flow, try to increase their duration. Whenthose muscles get tired try to increase the intervals of your flexing. Switch it up.

The point being in developing a rhythmic pumping of them in which a constant flow is being generated into your brain. The process is augmented in meditation. Please do.

OK so the benefits...oh well....everything. The things that will come to mind will astonish you. The rest of your body will be vitalized. You will gain muscle tone and great physical strength. You will get smarter. You will develop psychic traits. I don't want to fill the thread with promises and hype....but you will notice almost immediate results after only a few days of an hour or two.

It is hard at first and kind of frustrating. You might look and feel like a victim of scanners from the movie.
The truth is after enough trial and practice you will be able to create long flows using your whole skull.

IMO the brain does more than store data. I think it treats blood and charges it with your life force. It empowers your body with a stronger bioelectric field. This in turn feeds your brain better blood.

OK. Side effects....
Your eyes will tear up. You will get into a heightened emotional state but this is purely physical. Your head will feel nice and tight. Pressureized and strong. Like when you flex your arm, it feels good.

You will want to breath deeper breaths. Maybe its just me. But I feel like my blood is not oxygenated the way I want after. Has led me to some theories....

There is more but that is it for now.....



EDIT:
I forgot to mention that your eyes will instinctively close. You can't do it with them open for some reason.
you might see a tunnel form like you are coming out of it. I have my theories about that as well but more later once people can collaborate.

edit on 21-10-2012 by BIHOTZ because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:34 PM
link   
sorry sounds real interesting but am having trouble identifying the muscles you're referring to.

Where do they start and end ??

Are they internal or run externally ??

Do they run down the front of your face or the side of your head ??

Sorry for the questions but I wasnt sure what muscles you meant.



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:43 PM
link   
reply to post by fastbob72
 


Back and sides inside your neck. Internally. Try to make yourself yawn. Best way to identify them.

Look at a diagram of human muscle groups. They start midway In your throat and run up to your skull around your ears and temples.

edit on 21-10-2012 by BIHOTZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:49 PM
link   
Really interresting intel right there!

you sir got a flag!



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:58 PM
link   
www.bookrags.com...

Most of the activity is in your skull starting where your brain stem is. I referenced the yawning reflex because it is a good visual aid for the muscles involved. It is also very much neurological in nature but that is not important now. You will feel the blood flow from the sides of your skull and inside of it up by the frontal lobes. Then inside dead center.

It starts at the base of the skull but the muscles are in the neck as well. The thoracic muscles are involved but they just "push" or pump the blood into your skull. If you are hyper flexing them you are doing something wrong.

Don't just look away from your screen and try. Meditation and body awareness are important to get started. The initial identification and development is hard. It will not be easy. Patience and slow nerve impulses to the muscle group are necessary. You will get a natural feeling of how to do it eventually. You can't half ass it though.

edit on 21-10-2012 by BIHOTZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 05:58 PM
link   
Really interesting thread. I know the exact 'pressure' sound you are talking about. If you ever played the 1990ish version of tomb raider when you moved the boulders for puzzles they would make this exact noise. My friend and I discussed it once when we were younger but I'd never thought anything of it until you made this thread. I will implement this into my meditations. thank you.



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 06:17 PM
link   
Interesting stuff!
When i yawn i make noises like a baby dinosaur, is that related? Or am i just a complete weirdo?



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 06:28 PM
link   
reply to post by OpenEars123
 


Well it is like sneezing. We all have our preferred way. You don't have to yawn every time. Another way to identify the muscles is to pop your ears. Same muscle group. If you have every taken a flight and stabilized the pressure in your sinuses then you have flexed the right muscles. It is also neurological in nature. I am not good with medical terminology but if some one else is help us out here.

As you develop methods post them here to help out others I failed to convey this to.

Breathing is involved as well as muscle impulse but the best way to go about it is body awareness.

And no you are not a wierdo....LOL I sound like a banshee when I sneeze.


+37 more 
posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 06:44 PM
link   
reply to post by BIHOTZ
 


When you yawn, it increases blood flow to your scalp, not your brain.

Your brain is largely supplied by blood vessels that run beside your spine. You'd have far greater control over blood to your brain by clenching muscles in your throat.

The pineal gland is buried deep in the brain and is very low (close to the spine). It is not right up in your brain but is at the top of your spine. If you have your head centered and at rest, and drew a horizontal line back from the tip of your nose, that line would probably go through the pineal gland.

The sound you hear when you clench the muscles in your skull is due to pressure constriction in your ears, which are located higher than your pineal.

I am unconvinced.



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 06:54 PM
link   
reply to post by BIHOTZ
 

This is interesting. Recently i learned about tickling the amygdala, and the effect achieved
sound remarkably similar to those you describe, but can be achieved in a much simpler manner.

It is best to just copy and paste this short summary, as it is clear and concise.


Twenty years ago Dr. James Austin, a neurologist, had a mystical experience. As a result, he did not join a religious order, nor, for that matter, did he begin one. What he did begin was a new field of scientific exploration called neurotheology.

In a nutshell, neurotheology is the study of what goes on in the human brain when one is having a peak spiritual experience. While scientists, yogis and philosophers have speculated on the biological aspects of spirituality for centuries, it is only since the advent of sophisticated brain imaging techniques that we have been able to actually see “pictures” of the brain and thus explore the physical aspects of transcendence.

In 2001, a slender volume called Why God Won’t Go Away inspired a cover article in Newsweek magazine and introduced neurotheology to the wider public. When one of the book’s authors, radiologist Dr. Andrew Newberg, hooked up a long-time Buddhist meditator to a SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) scanner, he discovered that a portion of his frontal lobes lit up like a Christmas tree when he was in deep meditation. This led Newberg to surmise that this area of the brain may be partially responsible for feelings of spiritual transcendence. When he tested his theory on a group of Franciscan nuns at prayer, the nuns’ scans showed similar results to those of the Buddhist meditator, adding weight to his argument.





Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.


edit on 10/22/2012 by semperfortis because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 06:57 PM
link   
Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.
edit on 10/22/2012 by semperfortis because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 07:03 PM
link   
Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.




www.dreamviews.com...... Last comment on the page

Sorry for posting the whole comment, but it is very informative.

Is this anything similar to what you describe?

Here is a recent radio interview with Neil Slade, who goes into detail.
www.americanfreedomradio.com...

This could rock all our worlds, man.

edit on 21-10-2012 by OutonaLimb because: (no reason given)
edit on 10/22/2012 by semperfortis because: (no reason given)
edit on 10/22/2012 by semperfortis because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 07:13 PM
link   
reply to post by BIHOTZ
 


BIHOTZ, Star & Flag for starting this thread, you have piqued my interest and now I need to work on this technique. I can understand theory behind this, its the mechanics of getting the muscles to contract that will take time.

The yogis realized the benefit of increasing the blood flow to the brain and that's why inverted postures like headstand, shoulder stand, down dog, plow, forward bend, etc, are given star status in the yoga practice. I would truly love to find another way to improve the flow of blood to the brain, specifically the pineal gland, as I have high blood pressure and headstands are considered contradictive (sp) in such cases.

You've given me something to work on, thanks.

Namaste,
YogaGinns



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 07:17 PM
link   
I would also check the safety of this practice.

There are many people the may have complications.

Very interesting read...



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 07:46 PM
link   
I've been ablet do what you are describing since I was born. I can also do it with my eyes open no problem.



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 07:54 PM
link   
just in case it was lost in the above cluster I posted:


To locate your amygdalae (that’s the plural – there are two of them, one in each hemisphere), place your thumbs against your ears and middle fingers on the outside corners of your eyes. About 25mm inside your head from where your forefingers naturally come to rest on your temples is where your amygdalae reside.


Picture your amygdalae sitting there inside your brain, hyperactively warning you to “fight or flee.” Neurons like bolts of lightning are firing madly backwards, down to your brain stem, screaming, “Go! Go! Go!” For Lingo, the trick was to get that energy flowing forward, to the “rose garden” of the frontal lobes. He and his Brain Lab students and colleagues experimented with a variety of methods to reach that goal. In the end, one of the most powerful tools he discovered was simple visualization.

Visualize a feather softly tickling the anterior (forward) part of the amygdala, first on one side, then the other. If you prefer, use a pair of feathers and do both sides at the same time. That’s all there is to it. Just remember, gentleness (you’re using a feather, not a cattle prod!) and directing energy forward, into the frontal lobes, are the keys to success.


I urge everyone to try this. It certainly works for me, and I look forward to developing
this new found interaction further.
I believe it is what the OP has been inadvertantly doing -tickling his amygdala.



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 08:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by OutonaLimb
just in case it was lost in the above cluster I posted:


To locate your amygdalae (that’s the plural – there are two of them, one in each hemisphere), place your thumbs against your ears and middle fingers on the outside corners of your eyes. About 25mm inside your head from where your forefingers naturally come to rest on your temples is where your amygdalae reside.


Picture your amygdalae sitting there inside your brain, hyperactively warning you to “fight or flee.” Neurons like bolts of lightning are firing madly backwards, down to your brain stem, screaming, “Go! Go! Go!” For Lingo, the trick was to get that energy flowing forward, to the “rose garden” of the frontal lobes. He and his Brain Lab students and colleagues experimented with a variety of methods to reach that goal. In the end, one of the most powerful tools he discovered was simple visualization.

Visualize a feather softly tickling the anterior (forward) part of the amygdala, first on one side, then the other. If you prefer, use a pair of feathers and do both sides at the same time. That’s all there is to it. Just remember, gentleness (you’re using a feather, not a cattle prod!) and directing energy forward, into the frontal lobes, are the keys to success.


I urge everyone to try this. It certainly works for me, and I look forward to developing
this new found interaction further.
I believe it is what the OP has been inadvertantly doing -tickling his amygdala.


Wow..

As soon as I started the "tickling", i felt a head ecstasy for a couple of seconds and then lost it. I'm absolutely amazed at what I just experienced and I encourage any of you to give it a shot.







posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 08:30 PM
link   


There is an easy way to observe the amygdalae at work. There is a direct connection between the amygdala and the olfactory nerves, or sense of smell. Find something foul smelling – vinegar or rotten eggs do the trick for most people. Take a whiff. When you instinctively draw back from the source of the smell, your amygdalae are largely responsible for your feeling of repugnance. Now try the same thing with, say, a fragrant rose. What happens? A feeling of pleasure washes over you. Spring is in the air! The amygdalae have done their job once again, orchestrating the neurochemical pleasure response.


This part I found very interesting, as this is where abductees say they have implants put in up their noses.
So this implant must therefore be interfering with the amygdala.

I was told my amygdala was damaged, due to an abusive situation I was in as a child, which gives me a heightened sense of fight or flight. I try not to over react, as I have problems in the flight scenario.

I still don't know how to heal the amygdala.

This may be where panic attacks come from, in some people what do you think?



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 08:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by reflexlm

Originally posted by OutonaLimb
just in case it was lost in the above cluster I posted:


To locate your amygdalae (that’s the plural – there are two of them, one in each hemisphere), place your thumbs against your ears and middle fingers on the outside corners of your eyes. About 25mm inside your head from where your forefingers naturally come to rest on your temples is where your amygdalae reside.


Picture your amygdalae sitting there inside your brain, hyperactively warning you to “fight or flee.” Neurons like bolts of lightning are firing madly backwards, down to your brain stem, screaming, “Go! Go! Go!” For Lingo, the trick was to get that energy flowing forward, to the “rose garden” of the frontal lobes. He and his Brain Lab students and colleagues experimented with a variety of methods to reach that goal. In the end, one of the most powerful tools he discovered was simple visualization.

Visualize a feather softly tickling the anterior (forward) part of the amygdala, first on one side, then the other. If you prefer, use a pair of feathers and do both sides at the same time. That’s all there is to it. Just remember, gentleness (you’re using a feather, not a cattle prod!) and directing energy forward, into the frontal lobes, are the keys to success.


I urge everyone to try this. It certainly works for me, and I look forward to developing
this new found interaction further.
I believe it is what the OP has been inadvertantly doing -tickling his amygdala.


Wow..

As soon as I started the "tickling", i felt a head ecstasy for a couple of seconds and then lost it. I'm absolutely amazed at what I just experienced and I encourage any of you to give it a shot.






Cool my friend. I have been doing this for about a week now, and it is intense every time.
Try moving the imaginary feather around a little to locate the exact appropriate
spots. I place the amygdala just above both eyeballs, and in about one inch
from the front of the skull. Make sure you tickle the front of the almond shaped
amygdala, and an ecstatic feeling will be ensured everytime.
Sometimes i replace the feather with one of those mechanical rotating soft
tickly dusters. Man oh man!
Who knows where this will go, but i look forward to getting there!

This is paradigm shifting stuff. Bon Voyage!



posted on Oct, 21 2012 @ 08:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by AriesJedi



There is an easy way to observe the amygdalae at work. There is a direct connection between the amygdala and the olfactory nerves, or sense of smell. Find something foul smelling – vinegar or rotten eggs do the trick for most people. Take a whiff. When you instinctively draw back from the source of the smell, your amygdalae are largely responsible for your feeling of repugnance. Now try the same thing with, say, a fragrant rose. What happens? A feeling of pleasure washes over you. Spring is in the air! The amygdalae have done their job once again, orchestrating the neurochemical pleasure response.


This part I found very interesting, as this is where abductees say they have implants put in up their noses.
So this implant must therefore be interfering with the amygdala.

I was told my amygdala was damaged, due to an abusive situation I was in as a child, which gives me a heightened sense of fight or flight. I try not to over react, as I have problems in the flight scenario.

I still don't know how to heal the amygdala.

This may be where panic attacks come from, in some people what do you think?



I am sorry for your pain Aries.
I suggest you try the feather exercise, ensuring to locate properly and tickle the front
of your amygdala, and on both sides. The purpose is to stimulate/gravitate towards
the frontal lobe/creative parts of the brain, steering away from the rear reptilian/fight
or flight aspects, I think. It works everytime for me.

It can't hurt you to try at least, surely.

Listening to this interview with Neil Slade will surely be educational.
www.americanfreedomradio.com...

And his website: www.neilslade.com...

Good luck my friend.






top topics



 
97
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join