"You shouldn't take medicine for mental illness"...

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:26 AM
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I am thankful I had never heard of ATS when my situation arose. Mental Illness is no joke, I would never wish my experience on my worst enemy. However that experience helped me actually grow and work on releasing past trauma buried deep in my psyche. I never thought I would be thankful for those two years of what I could only describe as pure hell.

You seem like a very smart individual. After my diagnoses, I did as much research as possible on what they labeled me with. If you have the time you may find the work of Carl Jung interesting, with out his works I wouldn't have been able to integrate my experiences and more than likely would not be here today.

Something I left out of my previous post that may give you a heads up on the pharmaceutical industry. OP please watch the video, and thank you for the post. I wish you the best!




edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


A friend pointed out to me that if you suffer from depression, that it rears its head in the fall.

And I think she is very right.

So keep that in mind.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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People who go around thinking that forms of mental illness can be cured by carrots and sunshine as you say (lmao) really have no clue what mental illness is in the first place.

I will give them my husband for 2 weeks without medications, they will end up in the ER themselves.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:08 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Yes, seasonal affect disorder (SAD) is definitely part of it. I counter that by staying outside for as long as possible to get sunshine, and using the lightbulbs that emit the same frequencies that natural light does. They cost a bit more, but in my opinion are well worth it.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by Miri08
 
Good for you! it's very difficult to realize you need help and the medicine! many mentally ill and challenged people live in denial and think they dont need it when THEY DO! so you just keep on keeping on and don't let people tell you what you know is best for you.. no one knows you and your illness like you do.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I don't think it is necessarily SAD. For some reason changing to fall triggers depression for a lot of people.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 08:32 AM
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From my personal experience... fall is hard because it means the Holidays are approaching.

Also, support systems for somewhat isolated or introverted people tend to fall apart during the fall and winter as "normal" people tend to be both busier ( shopping, high work demand, etc ) and less willing to be social during the shorter, fall and winter days. So an isolated person becomes even more isolated during the cold months.

Combine the extra isolation with the melancholy from the Holidays and things can get quite rough.

~Heff



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


I do not believe mental illness can be solves with sunshine and rainbows, but I do feel it's necessary for people to do a bit of independent research into their diagnoses before accepting the new label into their idea of "self"
My previous post tried to explain my perspective from being thrown into such matters unexpectedly. However I ran out of room and had to reply again causing the posts to be separated by the dreaded page divider of doom



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by AwakeANDreaming
reply to post by nixie_nox
 

of room and had to reply again causing the posts to be separated by the dreaded page divider of doom


Can I steal that? lol

You are absolutely right in that people need to be seriously educated about their diagnosis. These are hard to diagnos in the first place, and the wrong medications can send someone spiraling out of control.

My husband was diagnosed for depression for over 15 years. I was the one who figured out it was bipolar.

I also believe that general practitioners or PCP should have nothing to do with psychiatry and send folks to a pdoc.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Of course you may steal that lol nobody owns anything if everyone is free, that's why this ship is going down!


Sorry! Let It Be Sung
edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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A psychiatrist prescribes medication for, usually, one of two reasons: one the person is depressed, and needs a sort of "pick-me-up" to help the healing/dealing process starts (more on this in a bit). The second is because a person is mentally unstable and needs certain chemical imbalances restored (think bipolar).

Now, medication for depression, in my opinion as a univ. student in psychology, is a great thing, but it should only be a temporary state. It's purpose is to regulate your emotional state (very broad definition there), so that a person can begin to bring themselves back into their lives and society. However, with this being said, it should never be used as a crutch. When a person on medication begins to feel better about themselves, when the medication has started to kick in, that is when the patient should begin to evaluate (with aid of a psychologist/psychiatrist) why they are depressed. Once that information is known, it should be acted upon and eventually that problem should be solved. Once it is? Great! Off the medication you go! (Sometimes even before that!).

I have been on antidepressants myself, and that is exactly what I did. I used them until I was settled (a week or two), started figuring out the problem on why I was depressed, dealt with it, and got myself off the meds. The meds are great for clearing your head and letting you get to the root of a problem you might not otherwise have seen.

People believe that a psychologist is there to give you "happy" thoughts, and while we do try to boost your self-esteem, but stroking your ego is not what we are there for. We understand that telling a depressed person to think "happy" thoughts does not, and will not, make you happy. Asking a depressed person to be happy is like asking a fish to breath out of water.

Holistic alternatives to antidepressants may work for some, especially those who are low on the depressed scale, but honestly? That little pill gives you a high, regulating, dose no fruit or vegetable can give you. Where as I might be willing to agree the holistic approach is good for small day-to-day issues that can bring a person down, I cannot agree that a person with chronic, or major, depression go the holistic way.

Please understand this is a very broad generalization, and remember: never self-medicate.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


You may be on to something. All my fun summer activities ended, and now the holidays are looming.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by Munku
 





The second is because a person is mentally unstable and needs certain chemical imbalances restored


I respectfully disagree with the latter part of that statement. I am not disagreeing that the person is mentally unstable. In my humble opinion "chemical imbalance" is a cop out. We have been conditioned to except that as a "fact" when the reality is not one test or shred of evidence exists that can prove this is the problem. When you go to the Dr. they do not check your brain for an "imbalance" and then prescribe you a medication to counter act it. Think Diabetics/Insulin. What happens is the Dr. makes a subjective decision, often times they have to diagnose/prescribe the patient with "something" just so the persons insurance will front the bill.

I am currently in my 3rd year of psychology/human services as well, after my experience with a pretty sever psychiatric disorder and seeing what the system looks like from the inside out, I decided this is where I want to try and make a difference. I remind you I am not against medicine at all, I am against it as being the first approach towards someone problems/mental illness. Heck we prescribe kids 4 years old with meds to cure an imbalance we cant even prove exist! We have ZERO idea the long term effects of these drugs, yet we pass them out like candy as a first approach toward healing the patient.

edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by AwakeANDreaming
 


But people can have a chemical imbalance. Too much or too little serotonin, dopamine, or other neurotransmitters can cause an imbalance. And while it is true that there's no diagnostic test for a chemical imbalance, trial and error does work. It's just inefficient.

People seem to not understand that every thought has a chemical signature, along with the foods we eat. If more people understood this, maybe it would help.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by AwakeANDreaming

People seem to not understand that every thought has a chemical signature, along with the foods we eat. If more people understood this, maybe it would help.


I agree 100%, it is just when you go to the Dr. you are not told this. You are told you have "_________", and you get sent home with a new medication and a new label to throw onto you idea of "self". Mental Illness has a horrid stigma these days. We are used to healing everything with a pill as the first and often times ONLY healing the patient receives.

I feel we should look at the patient and their situation as a whole first. Cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, etc before we use medicine as the first method. Even more so on children



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I do not intend to come of as arrogant or argumentative with you, please do not take my words in that way. It is hard get tone through simple words. I admit I hold a certain bias in this situation because the way I was at first ran through the current mental health field. I can tell you the worst part was the label that came with my diagnoses, the second was the stigma behind it.

I did not find the current system conducive to actually healing, quite the contrary what I encountered in my State, PA could have ended badly for me. I do not wish to go into details, but I assure you we can do better. That is why I now hope to make a difference in the life of someone who may end up in a position like my own. Just to clarify I am not saying medicine is bad in any way shape or form.
edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by Miri08
 


its quite possible that the medicine is causing those things, im crazy too so a i feel you man, but i would never ever let the state medicate me EVER!!


my ex girlfriend said she was depressed and all that and she would never go without her meds, but we broke up because i realised she could easily get past it and she just wanted and excuse to not give a f**k, im not saying thats you just saying,

I think a diagnosis by a psychiatrist and a presciption for medication just reinforce this paradigm of ''ive got [insert condition] and thats that, all i can do is try and work with it, because theres no hope of ever being rid of it''

Ive been in some very very dark places my friend, VERY dark places, and now im out the other end and i did it without any help from psychiatrists (though ive been to loads) or medication (well, legal medication anyway, but thats a whole other thread)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by simplyLOVE
 


I can relate. However I disagree that I am "crazy". I would still argue that is why it is so easy for us to except these labels thrown onto our friends and loved ones. This is a crazy world we live in these days, When you name something it gives you a good feeling because you believe you now understand it, when in fact that is not true. It also gives those without the label the notion that they are in sane, that is comforting and dangerous.

I was a "normal" person, heck I didn't even read ATS yet. My moms side of the family has schizophrenia in her genealogy (it is now shown triggers can activate these genes), resulting in the suicide of her father. About two years ago after certain events I was diagnosed with this disorder. I was told I had a debilitating brain condition that would get progressively worse over time, told I had apply for social security disability because without insurance I could not afford the plethora of meds I would need to take for the remainder of my adult life.

I was scared out of my mind. The meds made my dreams discussing, when previously my dreams were amazing. After 7 days in a mental hospital, felt embarrassed beyond belief because of my new label. Finally decided this is not who I am, I am not crazy. I am the most loving person I know, seriously. I started doing my own independent research into my diagnoses, and decided to get off the meds work on healing my fragmented psyche. After 2 years I felt comfortable enough to go back to school and put my self in a position to help others who may experience something similar to my own.

Mental Illness has such a negative stigma. Did you know most schizophrenics are in fact VERY loving and empathetic? I am lucky to be alive. I can look back on my experience now and be thankful for it. It helped me realize who I am, and who I am not. That is why I have such a strong bias towards certain things brought up in this thread.

edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by AwakeANDreaming
 


You don't sound argumentative at all; you're just sharing your knowledge in a very polite way. It's appreciated....if only more people could express a dissenting viewpoint so nicely.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by AwakeANDreaming
 


You don't sound argumentative at all; you're just sharing your knowledge in a very polite way. It's appreciated....if only more people could express a dissenting viewpoint so nicely.


Thank you for the kind words. It is hard to get tone across on the interwebs. It's easy to forget to be mindful when someone has a different viewpoint than you own. That is one of the dangers I see when we allow these "labels" into our self image. We hold our beliefs close to our heart, so being passionate about them is great but on a deeper level you have to remember the other person holds there own beliefs just as close to their heart as you do, whether you see them as being "wrong" doesn't change that fact. When we hear another conflict our word we feel personally attacked by them, but that is silly. Even more so when it comes to religion, but that is another thread. Thanks again for saying what you did, I realize now I was projecting my own emotions onto you lol sorry.
edit on 22-10-2012 by AwakeANDreaming because: (no reason given)





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