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Ancient 4,200-year-old Fortress Found

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posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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Ancient 4,200-year-old Fortress Found

Fort-zoom Spanish archaeologists have discovered an impressive structure with 4,200-year-old outer walls and six pyramid-shaped towers, representing the most architecturally advanced Bronze Age fortress.

One of the most relevant elements of the discovery was the secondary door, located near the main entrance The door's arch is in very good conditions and is the first one to be found in prehistoric Europe.

"Some of the fortification traits, such as the massive towers and the secondary door, could be found in some places of the Eastern Mediterranean slightly before 2200 B.C. This might show unexpected political relations between distant regions," Rafael Micó, professor of prehistory at the Autonomous University of Barcelona‭ and a member of the "La Bastida Project" direction team, told Discovery News.



Now here is a very intriguing find.

The design of the structure is very similar to others in the Eastern Mediterranean. Reminiscent of the city of Troy in Turkey and other known ancient sites. This may push back the timeline of ancient sea fairing trade and possibly exploration out into the Atlantic and beyond {Pure speculation on my part}.

Note:
There were a few threads written a while ago about how some believe the mythical "Atlantis" was actually a large port city on the West Coast of Spain in the Atlantic that may have been destroyed by a giant Tsunami. No, I'm not saying this is that old but, Could this either be a lingering related remnant or just simply and unrelated but very interesting site?.

I can't wait for more in depth details on the sites beginnings and whatever else they may find.

As always,
Stay tuned.




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Good find! S & F for you.

I've always believed that ancient man was far more widespread than the popular theories suggest and that cultures may have been significantly advanced. But since the population pressure was so low, finds proving that would be very few and far between.

Having read the Iliad in Greek with the descriptions of the greek ships, I see no real reason to doubt that your theory is possible.

Cheers,



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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I'm going to say it my friend,
Slayer you are hands down my favorite member of ATS.
It's thread like these that help me realize how lucky we are to have you.
You are thorough, with no hyperbole. And most importantly the threads are
FUN.
Here's star 70,000 whatever, haha.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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Very cool find Slayer
I swear you must get alerts when new finds are made
I do wonder though who actually inhabited this site in it's hay day? I wonder if any smaller things were found. Like coins or weapons, might tell us a little bit more than the structures.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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That's just an outstandng find.

As usual,how do we date the find to not contradict with written history by the "experts?"

Good stuff.




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by niceguybob
 


The "Experts" have often painted themselves into a corner with their methodology



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 01:04 PM
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Just goes to show that our knowledge of the past may only be the "tip" of the pyramid.
(forgive the pun)

edit on 20-10-2012 by beezzer because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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another s+f for the collection, as per usual i love your threads the most!



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Interesting find. Looks intact for the most part. Walls haven't crumbled in earthquakes or been "taken down" by conquering armies. It is on the side of a hill, instead of the top(?). That is vulnerable from a "occupy the highest ground" viewpoint. Definitely military in nature. A strong hold, maybe an outpost guarding a pass or monitoring trade routes in the valley. For tariffs and that kind of thing.

"You come thru here, the king gets his cut."


Indeed, the fortress contained unique military features. For example, the lime mortar offered exceptional solidity to the construction,‭ ‬strongly holding the stones and making the wall impermeable,‭ ‬as well as eliminating any elements attackers could hold on to.‭



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Awesome find!
This thing looks impressive , a huge city for its time and nobody knows what it was called and who built it.
What puzzles me is that this is an inland town ,if i read google map correctly - 10+ km from the shore in the best case.
From what i know ancient Mediterranean civilizations usually choose first coastal areas for cities. And it is near Cartagena (place of Carthago Nova,that was much younger city then La Bastida site). Maybe the dating is a bit off?
Can't they find a stone with inscription,coins or .... something already
?



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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I thought many here would appreciate the article and find. It's great to know others share the same interest. This is one of the main reasons I enjoy ATS.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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The design of the structure is very similar to others in the Eastern Mediterranean. Reminiscent of the city of Troy in Turkey and other known ancient sites. This may push back the timeline of ancient sea fairing trade and possibly exploration out into the Atlantic and beyond {Pure speculation on my part}.

i dont even know why this is disputed anymore, it should be taught as fact, there is evidence all over the globe of different societies having artwork/money/sculptures/architecture, on and on, so either humans have an instinct to guess what others are doing halfway across the globe, or we freakin traded, im down with tradding versus some magic mumbo jumbo.

AWESOME love when we keep finding more and more, im sure if we scraped 25% top soil away from around world we would probably find tons caved in from asteroid /meteorite impacts,tsunamis ect .

also , why is when they find something its ALWAYS a fort/ fortress, why couldnt it just be a walmart or a starbucks lol

also does it say where it is , i couldnt find in article, id like to see on google earth and see what is in area?
edit on 20-10-2012 by ~widowmaker~ because: add



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by niceguybob
 


The "Experts" have often painted themselves into a corner with their methodology



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Image of the La Bastida site



This is thought to be part of the Agaric culture

The culture




The site in the OP is #6 in the map above you can see how it is associated with the other sites of the Algaric culture

These guys were contempary with the well known Bell beaker culture

The abstract for the report




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Instead of Atlantis I personally would wonder more if this could relate to the Sea-Peoples...some link them as coming from Anatolia (as well as various other theories). It would be interesting if some ended up settling in SE Spain...that could explain the building styles.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by niceguybob
 


The "Experts" have often painted themselves into a corner with their methodology



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Harte
I'd be interested to read of the "shock" that hit "the Experts" concerning this site.

Got some?

Harte



Lemmie check...


Originally posted by SLAYER69
The "Experts" have often painted themselves into a corner with their methodology



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 11:16 PM
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Experts like to Claim pseudoarcheology, or fringe science when the impossible meets the possible.

Cant wait to see what they dig up.




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Always love to find a new thread in Ancient Civs, and see it was authored by you. Good find, and a great read.

Hadn't heard about this one yet. Thanks!



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by sealing
 


Thanks sealing. I try to search at least twice a week for something new or interesting to post in this forum.

I'm glad you enjoyed it






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