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Sleep - What is it good for?

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posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:08 AM
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Our bodies need food and air for energy. Why do we also need sleep?

The easy answer is that we need sleep to overcome sleepiness, but why do we get drowsy when we funnel energy into our stomachs three times a day?



Our bodies still function while we're in dreamland. The heart beats harder, and we can move around a lot. So, how does sleep restore energy to our bodies?



Is it an evolutionary flaw?



If there is a time during each day when we are completely helpless against predators looking to kill and eat us, it's when we're asleep. Why didn't evolution do away with sleep millions of years ago?

I just thought of this question a few minutes ago. I did a search to find the answer, and guess what? Even science isn't sure why we sleep. A lot of theories though:

Why Do We Sleep, Anyway?




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:23 AM
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Originally posted by jiggerj
Our bodies
we?
we
our stomachs
Our bodies



I dont have the answer, but if you want one you need to get away from humans. Thats way too specific.

wiki

Edit - today I learned...
Hibernation markedly reduces the need for sleep, but does not remove it. Hibernating animals end their hibernation a couple of times during the winter so that they can sleep.

edit on 20-10-2012 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:30 AM
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hi op

Here is an interesting little read

The Man Who Never Slept

www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com...



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:35 AM
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Because you need an escape from reality, your conscious needs to be unconscious for while



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Hormones necessary for growth and developement, amongst other things, are why we sleep. If humans were not meant to sleep then our brains also wouldn't produce melatonin as the natural sunlight starts to dim.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Sleep - What is it good for?
I've often pondered this, yet it's beyond resistance for me... as much as I try, I always give in to it, ha.

This quote from your link sums it up in short for me.
harvard.edu

Restorative Theories Another explanation for why we sleep is based on the long-held belief that sleep in some way serves to "restore" what is lost in the body while we are awake. Sleep provides an opportunity for the body to repair and rejuvenate itself.


There's also the circadian rhythm to consider, maybe it plays a role??
wiki-circadian rhythm




posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 06:27 AM
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Originally posted by davesmart
Here is an interesting little read



A very interesting little read.

But how do I find out if John Alan Jordan's story is true?
By the dates given, this article was written around 2007, and John says he stopped sleeping in 2006, and a search of the internet finds not a single other account of him ever existing at all...

And the second one... "Scientists are yet to study Ngoc Thai in any detail. " doesnt inspire confidence, especially when all we know of his existence is one single solitary article in a Vietnamese newspaper from years ago.

I would have though sleep labs all around the world would have been been falling over each other in order to find out more about these strange folk in the years that have gone by.
If these people even exist, that is.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 06:36 AM
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I think there is probably a combination of factors, one of them will probably be energy conservation, another will be cell regeneration and also it was probably to bypass the dark hours where we couldn't see anyway before we invented torches.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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Isnt it so we can process our memories from that day into our long term memory bank? Isnt that was REM sleep does?



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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Originally posted by michael1983l
I think there is probably a combination of factors, one of them will probably be energy conservation, another will be cell regeneration and also it was probably to bypass the dark hours where we couldn't see anyway before we invented torches.


To think that sleep helps in energy conservation is to imply that living things don't do that just by sitting and resting. I don't about cell regeneration; don't they regenerate when we're awake?

As for sleeping because we couldn't see anything at night, I want to go back in our evolutionary past and trade that sleep in for night vision!



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 07:46 AM
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OP, I've always wondered why this was "built in" to our human experience too.

I will tell you this, I believe it has more to do with the brain's needs than anything else. At times when I have had very little sleep (2 hours or so) I have huge problems with memory: word-recall, remembering why I went into a room, remembering what I had for a meal the previous day, etc. Very unsettling, like a glimpse at what Alzeimers might feel like.

Also, when I am up way too long, I begin to experience visual 'disturbances' as if my visual cortex is on overload with the day's information gathering and begins to malfunction.

So, I've always accepted the notion that sleep was a time for the brain to process the day-- to take this new knowledge and link it, in every way possible, to the intricate web of existing information already stored, to sort out inconsistencies and contradictions to previously stored information, to sort through the whole mixture of experiences from that day gathered by all the senses, and commit the most powerful ones to long-term memory.

I have always felt that dreams are the language of our sub-conscience at work sorting through a lifetime of thought and memory, trying to make it all fit together so nothing contradicts, trying to work through fears and misgivings, and enjoy happy moments from the past, as well as deal with thoughts of the future.

Interesting topic to speculate on, OP. Thanks!



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


It is quite interesting that we can become used to sleeping patterns - if we sleep for 9 hrs a night we will be tired if we get 7, if we sleep for 7 hrs a night we will become used to it and not be tired.

This is something that is surely on my mind right now. We need to experience and there is obviously no way because I am not talking about a dream. Yet now is a perfect example, I am writing and I know for sure that if I was very tired I would not be writing. I have completely trained myself to wake when the light of the sun hits the earth.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


My favorite part of sleeping is waking up.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by MyParadoxicalSelf
reply to post by jiggerj
 


My favorite part of sleeping is waking up.


My fav part of sleeping is sleeping! There's nothing like letting go of the world's troubles and slipping into LaLa land. So, to the ladies, if I ask you to sleep with me - I mean SLEEP!

edit on 10/24/2012 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 





My fav part of sleeping is sleeping! There's nothing like letting go of the world's troubles and slipping into LaLa land.


Good point! You can't wake someone who is pretending to sleep. Ignorance is bliss.



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