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What did the Founding Fathers want?

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by antonia
 


Yea, because they didn't have any money. The whole beginning of America was about being strapped for cash.



Yet they had enough money to lavish on their officers who got paid, got the best clothes and didn't have to fight barefoot in the snow.




posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by alldaylong
 


John Adams was not wealthy by any stretch of the imagination, and he pretty much carried the majority of the revolution and government building.

But many of them were rich. Which means that they were willing to sacrifice their income, their land, everything, for the revoution. in fact, eight of them went bankrupt after the Constitution was signed.

Remember, the only way to be rich was land holdings. There was no central bank, there was no set system of currency, and no stocks.So your money could go as quickly as it came, even with one year of bad crops.

If you look at the fortunes of about the first 15 presidents, you will see that their incomes drastically rose and fell.


I think that's partly true and partly not .... just like now, credit was available for those with equity and good standing. Go back to the bios of some of the signers who lost their shirts, like Robert Morris:


During the later years of his public life, Morris speculated wildly, often on overextended credit, in lands in the West and at the site of Washington, DC. To compound his difficulties, in 1794 he began constructing on Philadelphia's Chestnut Street a mansion designed by Maj. Pierre Charles L'Enfant. Not long thereafter, Morris attempted to escape creditors by retreating to The Hills, the country estate along the Schuylkill River on the edge of Philadelphia that he had acquired in 1770.


Banks and money houses existed in the colonies, as well as in London and France, although there were no loans available for the little people. Where have I heard that before?

Of course there were a few founders who gambled their fortunes for independence and lost, but most of them recovered their losses and many others made boodles from the war. That's why the biographies on the first two pages are so important, IMO.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by antonia
 


Who?



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by frazzle
 


I didn't say there wasn't banks, I said there wasn't a central bank.

Some may have made money from the war, many lost their shirts, including Washington himself, who basically the Presidency was designed for.

They were educated men, of course they were going to be well to do. That was the class system then. If you had the money, you had the education and means. Do you think poor, uneducated farmers had the wherewithall to negotiate with France, coordinate an army and start a government?



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by antonia
 


Who?


You know nothing about the history yet you want to lecture us about it? As for the poor farmers you mention in your next post, the single-handedly ran the British out of western Massachusetts before the war began without so much as firing a shot. They were more than capable of setting up a government and your statement smacks of elitism.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by Semicollegiate
 


The Capital was designated to not belong to any state, as the fF didn't want to give one state more power or prestige over the others. Virginia gave land to the capital, so did Maryland. They didn't give DC
to Virginia. It is for that very reason that DC can't become the 51st state, because of the law that DC can't be affiliated with a state, though it meets all other requirements.

Virginia was given their portion back during the civil war, which is why DC is no longer a diamond.

The location was picked because it was smack center of what was the US at the time.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by antonia
 


I am asking which officers were paid.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by antonia
 


I am asking which officers were paid.


Go look up the Pennsylvania Line mutiny and the New Jersey Mutiny and you will find out.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Matt1951
 


Washington released his remaining slaves after the revolution, and many of the founding fathers the antislavery society.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by Matt1951
 


Washington released his remaining slaves after the revolution, and many of the founding fathers the antislavery society.


Ahem, no he didn't do that. "He died at the age of 67 in 1799. In his will, he emancipated his slaves."
www.let.rug.nl...

One of those things you can't take with you when you go to the big plantation in the sky.

ETA, Read what they said, they wanted slavery to be prohibited in new states that would be admitted to the union.

edit on 22-10-2012 by frazzle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by frazzle
 


I didn't say there wasn't banks, I said there wasn't a central bank.

Some may have made money from the war, many lost their shirts, including Washington himself, who basically the Presidency was designed for.

They were educated men, of course they were going to be well to do. That was the class system then. If you had the money, you had the education and means. Do you think poor, uneducated farmers had the wherewithall to negotiate with France, coordinate an army and start a government?

His wartime financial sacrifices and long absence, as well as generous loans to friends, had severely impaired his extensive fortune, which consisted mainly of his plantations, slaves, and landholdings in the West


From George Washington's biography:


His wartime financial sacrifices and long absence, as well as generous loans to friends, had severely impaired his extensive fortune, which consisted mainly of his plantations, slaves, and landholdings in the West.

Despite his sympathy with the goals of the Annapolis Convention (1786), he did not attend. But, the following year, encouraged by many of his friends, he presided over the Constitutional Convention, whose success was immeasurably influenced by his presence and dignity.


I wonder how many of those "friends" in the second paragraph were the SAME "friends" as in the first. One hand washes the other regardless of the century.

There was a great deal more to Washington's history than children't fables about cherry trees and wooden teeth.

edit on 22-10-2012 by frazzle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 

No Washington did not release his slaves. He worked them very hard and kept them very poor. They wore soiled clothes or burlap bags. He also pulled their teeth, to try to have them implanted in his mouth. George lived the life of royalty. George Washington's expense account:www.amazon.com...
"Was George Washington first in war; first in peace; and first in discovering the joys of an unlimited expense account? Hint: Generals earned $166 per month. At the end of 8 years of war George Washington presented an expense account of $499,261.51. That was when a dollar was a continental. Washington included interest for money he loaned himself and depreciation. He later offered to work only for expenses as president and got a salary instead."
Washington was the wealthiest man in America after the war. Wealthier than any President since. The only "founding fathers" who truly worked for abolition were Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, who belonged to the same abolitionist society in NY City in the 1790s. Burr went even farther, arguing all people, including Indians, should be treated as equals. John Adams also hated slavery. But the junta of Virginians wanted slavery. All appeals by black Americans of the era were rejected.
edit on 22-10-2012 by Matt1951 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 11:47 AM
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Where the rubber met the road. Long live the king.


On January 22, 1783 Congress ratified a contract for the repayment of 21 loans that the UNITED STATES had already received dating from February 28, 1778 to July 5, 1782. Now the UNITED STATES Inc. owes the King money which is due January 1, 1788 from King George via France. King George funded both sides of the Revolutionary War.

Now the Articles of Confederation which were declared in force March 1, 1781 States in Article 12:
"All bills of credit emitted, monies borrowed, and debts contracted by, or under the authority of Congress, before the assembling of the United States, in pursuance of the present confederation, shall be deemed and considered a charge against the United States, for payment and satisfaction whereof the said United States, and the public faith are hereby solemnly pledged."

The Articles of Confederation acknowledge the debt owed to King George.

Now after losing the Revolutionary War, even though the War was nothing more than a move to turn the people into debtors for the King, the conquest was not yet complete. Now the loans were coming due and so a meeting was convened in Annapolis, Maryland, to discuss the economic instability of the country under the Articles of Confederation. Only five States come to the meeting, but there is a call for another meeting to take place in Philadelphia the following year with the express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation On February 21, 1787 Congress gave approval of the meeting to take place in Philadelphia on May 14, 1787, to revise the Articles of Confederation. Something had to be done about the mounting debt. Little did the people know that the so called founding fathers were going to reorganize the United States because it was Bankrupt.

On September 17, 1787 twelve State delegates approve the Constitution. The States have now become Constitutors. Constitutor: In the civil law, one who, by simple agreement, becomes responsible for the payment of another's debt. Blacks Law Dictionary 6th Ed.

The States were now liable for the debt owed to the King, but the people of America were not because they were not a party to the Constitution because it was never put to them for a vote.


www.theforbiddenknowledge.com...

Bamboozled right from the start. Slaves right from the start.


There are no states, just corporations. Every body politic on this planet is a corporation. A corporation is an artificial entity, a fiction at law. They only exist in your mind. They are images in your mind, that speak to you. We labor, pledge our property and give our children to a fiction. For an in-depth look into the nature of these corporations and to see how you also have been declared a fictional entity. See: AMERICAN LAW AND PROCEDURE. JURISPRUDENCE AND LEGAL INSTITUTIONS. VOL.XIII By James De Witt Andrews LL.B. (Albany Law School), LL.D. (Ruskin University) from La Salle University. This book explains in detail the nature and purpose of these corporations, you will be stunned at what you read.

Now before we go any further let us examine a few things in the Constitution.
Article six section one keeps the loans from the King valid it states; "All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation."
(same link as above)

Americans have believed and celebrated the scam for a couple hundred years with hot dogs and beer, and now that the emperor's nakedness is showing, enter the UN and the IMF/World bankers to cover their a$$et$. So clever.

Long live King Ponzi.





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