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Most bizzare martial arts move you've ever seen....

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posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by endtimesprophet
 



The earily UFC's it was existing style against existing style. There was no such thing back then as MMA. mma is a new relatively new martial art based on what they've proven to work in the octagon and meant for the octagon. Could a mma fighter beat a street fighter? It's hard to say, as a street fighter would go for blows that could kill, where mma fighters aren't trained to do that. Just my opinion. But on youtube you can watch the early ufc fights, those are the best ones by far!




posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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It is real folks. It is called 'Kyosho Jitsu' or 'Pressure Point Fighting'. Precise pressure to cure ailments (Accupuncture) or affect the nervous system to disable or kill someone. It is unbelievable but that is the real truth if one can master the techniques of attacking the pressure points related to the nerves. I took a class for a year and dropped out eventually as I had to move out of state for work reasons. Now dont have the time with 2 toddlers..but would love to resume someday as at the least, it kept me fit.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


Your absolutely correct with this post. You fight the way you train. MMA fighters are trained for sport. Sure they know street moves. But the difference is when the heat is on you fall back on your training. If it's been drilled into you to take a guy to the ground and try and pound him once there. You going to try that in a fight. If you train to circle around the guy waiting for a opportunity to counter strike and essentially wasting time, thats what you'll do in a fight. BOth of which will get you seriously hurt or worse. Never go to the ground in a fight even if your winning. The guys friends will see to it that you don't win once you're on the ground. It's really unrealistic to think anything good will come out of going to the ground.

In actuality, striking fast and hard to the guys neck or head right from the get go and simply incapacitating someone is better and safer. Hit hard, hit fast, and be damned violent about it thats how you survive a street fight. So you need to train like that so that is your natural response. An MMA guy is liable to fall into sport fighting and won't even use half the weapons at his disposal. Even if he knows how to use those tools, the thought simply won't occur to them until afterwards to even use them.

PS. Going for the takedown will get you uppercutted from a pro fighter who actually understands striking. DOn't try to be an MMA guy in a street fight. Try and be a Krav Maga or a Jeet Kun Do, or better yet a Kajukempo player. THey train stuff that will keep you alive in a street fight.

edit on 19-10-2012 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by r2d246
 


Its part hypnotic phenomena, the setup is what makes it work, the target creates an expectation and that is soon realized... No martial arts needed or pressure points. It is like walking to a stranger telling you that you will be hypnotizing him and with a startle command him to sleep. most people will drop right there in the spot...

Of course that having a plant will help and with enough force like most other posters said the taps will do a great job, in this case if the subject was not on it they simply are work as hypnotic convincers...



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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So many martial artists and pseudo-experts on ATS, and nobody mentioned the "3-Pressure Point Knockout"??
Maybe it was in one of the links I didn't click on.

It is both real and Hoax. It is taught as a real technique, and it has some loose basis in physiology, but it is also basically impossible to carry out, and limited in effectiveness by the necessity for pinpoint and lightning fast accuracy that most mere mortals can only dream about or deliver to willing participants, LOL!

It doesn't require a neck strike. Hypothetically it can be any 3 key pressure points or nervous system nodes.

Personally, I don't believe any living being could deliver those 3 strikes on me or any other angry aggressor.

Now, it is still a neat thing to learn, because even if you can't get all three, it is nice to deliver an accurate blow to a pressure point to create "dead-arm" or "dead-leg," or just for general purpose of placing your blows with purpose to the most vulnerable areas of your opponent.

Hypothetically, in a perfect world, against a lumbaring opponent, it could, possibly work? I guess. BUT, it definitely should not be a part of anyone's self-defense strategy. A kick to the groin produces much, much more rewarding and consistent results. Eye rakes, temple or neck blows, or of course, my very favorite, create distance and grab your gun! When learning or using self-defense, go with the time-proven methods and force equalizers!



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by Panic2k11
 


Another excellent point! These "human stun gun" types usually only can get the stuff to work on their students. A very large part of it is the gullible students "want" to believe that causes them to collapse after the strike. So in a way they are sorta hypnotized. It still requires force to use pressure point strikes against people in a real situation. But the strikes really do work if they land.

But I still gotta warn, Other than the forearm, shin and side of neck, and parts of the floating ribs there aren't many pressure points that are easy to hit in actual combat. So folks should really only focus on the ones they are likely to even hit in a fight. One doesn't need to study Dim Mak to learn the basics. Most decent martial art instructors will be able to teach them regardless of their art.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by darkhorserider
 

I have to disagree that pressure points can't be hit in rapid succession. I just think the fancier ones to hit are unrealistic in a fight. But the big major ones are right there and easy for the picking.

I've seen Silat/Kali guys that are good with their combos and can hit three pressure points nearly within a few milliseconds. THose guys don't mess around so when they want to shock the body or stun a limb while working their way to the neck for a chop or much worse, they won't use techniques that require any sort of accuracy. THey will simply elbow you on the inside of your biceps before following up with a elbow to the head or a neck crank. Believe me. Slam your elbow into a guys biceps full force and that guys arm is useless for 45 seconds. It's easy to do a stop hit with a snap kick to the guys shin (pressure point strike One)when he advances. At the same time or close to it you parry the guys punch with your outside hand. Thread/scoop guys hand/arm with the same hand you just parried with to the outside of his shoulder line essentially clearing it from the line of fire. With your opposite hand/arm elbow the guy in the biceps of the arm you just threaded out of the way. (Pressure point strike Two) time elapsed way under a second. PS if you think the guy is going to strike with his opposite hand after you've parried his initial strike you are in the perfect position to slam your hand through his face with the opposite hand that you would normally use for the elbow. So the guy is screwed if he tries to counter attack you.

Now use the original, now free, parrying arm to elbow the guy in the neck or base of the skull (pressure point strike number Three) Elapsed time, Maybe a second. And if the pressure point strikes don't do the guy in the elbow to the neck will either break it, or cause cerebral adema. It's simple, ergonomic, and has been used to drop people by many martial arts around the world for thousands of years.
edit on 19-10-2012 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by BASSPLYR
 


Those aren't really pressure points, they are just key target areas. The area where the rib meets the ab muscle, or a stop kick or stop punch are not pressure points. The 3-pressure point knockout requres you to hit nerve bundles, not just key target areas.

I'm not disagreeing with you, an elbow or strike to the bicep, or thigh is great, and even better if you land it on the tendon instead of the meat of the muscle. A strike just above the inner elbow, or a strike to a hip flexor muscle is a very effective (and somewhat entertaining) thing to do, but it isn't part of the knockout they are talking about in this thread.

Personally, I think the knockout is virtually impossible. The neck strike, or a temple strike, or even a brain-stem strike can definitely create the knockout, but those take considerable force. The pressure point knockout is all about the pinpoint accuracy and overloading the nervous system.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by darkhorserider
 


Yeah. I get what your saying. But what I mentioned are large nerve bundles. If I wanted to get really technical I'd be talking about hitting nerves buried deep in the arm pit of the right shoulder. A strike there stops the heart. But I say it's too difficult to hit in a fight. So I mentioned the big payoff nerve bundles. They are a part of Dim Mak too.

I agree with you though. SImply tapping on various nerve bundles like they do in the old kung fu movies and Wu Xia books is BS. You are right they still take some degree of force.

As for major striking areas. I would not consider the forearm or biceps a major striking area. It's part of the game plan but not really a high pay off target. I always teach others to go for the neck or head. Doesn't matter how you get there just as long as you control the guys head. That to me is a big payoff target. Once you got your hands on some ones head just about any strike there will incapacitate. And just about any neck crank or head lock will control the opponents spine locking it up allowing me to do just about anything I want from a throw. To a choke. To a vicious strike to the head, to even destructive strikes or collapses of the their body.

But for the most part I agree with your post. Just not that Dim Mak has to be delivered with super accuracy to super secret nerve bundles only a neurosurgeon would know about. Dim Mak works the same way a taser gun does. Hit a nerve hard enough and the pain signal will cascade through the body over loading the nerve signals. THere aren't secret combinations of strikes. Just agitation to the nerves in great volume.
edit on 19-10-2012 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by BASSPLYR
 


I pretty much agree with you, although I rarely go for a head shot. They expect it, its small, it has very thick bone, even an amateur instinctively protects their head, etc. If I ever do try to strike to the head, it is usually the base aound the neck, brainstem, below the ear, and maybe temple. Its kind of like a slam dunk in a basketball game. If you are clearly open, and the shot is a gimme, then maybe you can risk a little showboating and do something spectacular, but it is liable to backfire, LOL. I watch the head and focus attention there, because people are so prone to protecing the head, so I want to exploit that and keep their defenses in one place, but I almost always strike elsewhere. You mentioned the stop punch and stop kick, and I LOVE those! A short punch or elbow to the bicep, or a short kick or knee to a shin or thigh is a very simple, risk-free, and rewarding strike. It hurts and frustrates and exhausts the opponent, and many times it makes them hesitate before striking again. But then, I don't mind taking a few shots and outlasting an opponent, while many people strive to not get hit at all. I don't mind getting hit, as long as its on my terms.



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by darkhorserider
 


Dude! It sounds like we both share a very similar perspective on martial arts. I can't disagree with anything in your last post. It was spot on. I too agree stop hits are awesome. I always think the "spear" technique is a great way to realistically teach the stop hit. It does the stop hit to the attackers upper arm while also delivering a forearm strike to the side of the guys neck. Probably sure you know what I'm talking about.

When I was referring to hitting the head I was actually referring to the exact same spot you mentioned. The "triangle" made up of the button on the jaw (best place other than the Canine tooth of the upper maxillae) to instill angular rotation to the skull causing a knockout. the base of the neck, and the base of the skull where the ascending ramus sorta comes near the mastoid process and the vagus nerve along with the blood vessels there. I don't agree with hitting people on the boney part of the their upper skull. doesn't do as much as people think.

But yeah. Stop hits are key. That and working the angles with the footwork to stay n the outside of the "gate."



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by r2d246
 

The first two blows were theatrics to take the concentration. The third strike from the aggressor contacts the right side of the neck. A correct blow to right side of the neck will cause a lack of oxygen to the brain. This can results in dizziness or can render someone unconscious if ample force is applied.





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