Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

The moonlight burn the skin in the night like the Sun in daylight.

page: 3
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join

posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 07:03 AM
link   
reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 



sounds more like sunburn that still feels hot later in the night.
I was thinking of this but it lasted only when he went outside in the moonlight in a beautiful and hot summer night.

edit on 19-10-2012 by piequal3because14 because: beautiful and hot




posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 10:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by piequal3because14

Thank you Omega,sorry he is not susceptible to be highly photo sensitive and about that distance maybe an object or a cloud of unknown radiation of unknown type can somehow influence the way the Moon are behaving and of course only if he is positioned somewhere at that distance behind the moon...on the dark side!



Mate, the moon has no dark side... Also, since the moon rotates around the Earth, you suggest this object or cloud should be perhaps orbiting the Earth too?

And if so, I highly doubt it could be anything natural... It must then be something artificial...

It would help to verify the consistence of your friend's claims, and determine if this should be further investigated, if your friend could find other people who were outside that same night and had the same symptoms... If it is only your friend, there could be something wrong with him!

Cheers



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 10:53 AM
link   
I found these two explanations doing a quick search.




The simple answer is "No." If you do a Google (or other search engine) search on "sunburn moonlight" you will find these Web sites at Earth and Sky and "moonlight" at Wikipedia that discuss this question. Accordingly, moonlight is roughly 500,000 times less intense than direct sunlight, and thus has so much less sunburn-causing UV that there is no danger of "moonburn." If one assumes that a sunburn can be caused by 0.5 hours in direct sunlight, and simply scales that time by 500,000, you would have to be in the moonlight about 28.5 years without stopping to obtain the same burn. xxxx xxxx MadSci Physicist


and




And while we're all here: Some will occasionally claim that since the moon reflects UV radiation, staying out too long when it's full can get you a case of "moonburn." In medical parlance, these people are known as half-wits. The moon's only 0.0002 percent as bright as the sun and reflects UV light only about half as well as it does visible light; thus, eight hours of top-strength moonlight delivers less UV-B than a second of sun. www.straightdope.com...



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 11:55 AM
link   
reply to post by dcmb1409
 


Aye man, Straight Dope knows it all



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 12:10 PM
link   
reply to post by scarybear
 


The first article wasn't from straight dope.

www.madsci.org...

Like I said it was a quick search and didn't do an intensive search.



posted on Oct, 20 2012 @ 06:36 PM
link   
reply to post by dcmb1409
 


Nah, just kidding mate
It's cool





new topics

top topics
 
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join